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January 07, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-07

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THURSDAT, 7 JANUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUUR$DAY, 7 JANUARY 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

I

PROGRAM OF SPEAKERS, MEETINGS:
Two New Socialist Groups Shape Plans

'U' Fund-Raising Drive Gets Organized

By CLARENCE FANTO The ISC is a local organization
and is not linked to similar groups
Two new socialist student or- at the University of Chicago and
ganizAtions are now shaping plans the University of California at
for an active program of speak- Berkeley.r
era and meetings on campus nextB

g..

semester. Howard Salita, '64, chairman of
The groups, the Young Social- the YSA, believes his organiza-
ist Alliance (YSA) and the In- tion must have a "well-defined
dependent Socialist Club (ISC) political position arrived at by
expect to receive official campus means of internal democracy and
recognition from Student Govern- free discussion." He explained that
basic policy decisions are arrived
men Council soon. While bo at by "majority rule." The YSA
are based on a Marxist type grad stresses political action and edu-
Soialt deoogy, the gps cational efforts and is affiliated
differ in their organizational plans with the national YSA, which
and political outlooks,;claims over 500 members. The lo-
Eric Chester, '66, an organizer cal group presently consists of
of the ISC, said his group will four members, Salita said.
be "educational in nature, open DeBerry Campaign
to people with vague socialist Salit ted out that YSA
leanings." The ISC has not been activeta pohe Socialist Work r s
active on campus until recently. ative+ nte -SciaistWorers

only group which picketed Presi-1
dent Lyndon B. Johnson because1
of his Viet Nam policy, the only
group supporting Michigan's all-
Negro Freedom Now Party, and
the only local group which par-I
ticipated in the Direct ActionI
Committee's civil rights demon-
strations early this year at the
Ann Arbor City Hall.
Active, Militant
The YSA is "active and mili-
tant," Salita said.

publications than in direct poli-
tical action."
A third socialist group, the na-
tionwide W.E.B. Du Bois Clubs of
America, has been conducting a
drive aimed at opening new
branches on university campuses.
No Word
The two local socialist leaders
said they had no knowledge that
the Du Bois Club was planning to
start their own group on campus.
"If there were any such plans,
.,..,,y~ u., .. a , r~i,-"I

Regent Paul G. Goebel of Grand;
Rapids, national alumni chairman
of the University's $55 million
fund-raising drive, said the cam-
paign is currently getting orga-
nized on the local level in areas
across the country where there
are heavy concentrations of alum-
ni.
"The caliber of men we've been
able to attract to take responsi-

k
1

bility on the local level is amaz-
ing," Goebel commented.
"A number of gifts of some
size" were given "voluntarily"
when the massive 01uest for rli-

pany, and Frederick J. Vogt, re-
tiring president of a manufactur-
ing company, both of Grand Rap-
ids.
Hunting has also accepted the
campaign post of major gifts
chairman for the Grand Rapids
area. He is currently a member
of the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics.
Houston Banker
A Houston business and civic
leader has joined the National
Executive Committee of the pro-
gram. He is Robert W. Kneebone,
senior vice-president of a Houston
bank. A native of Michigan, Knee-
bone holds two degrees from the
University. He has served as a
member of the University's Devel-
opment Council and is on the
executive committee of the Presi-
dent's Club.
H. C. Armstrong, Pittsburgh
civic leader and industrialist, has
also joined the National Execu-
tive Committee.
A past national chairman of

l

the University Development Coun- University Regent, joined the Na-
cil, Armstrong at present is di- tional Executive Committee. Doan
rector-at-large of the Alumni is currently a member of the
Association. Graduate School Board of Gov-
A. H. Aymond, chairman of the ernors.
board and chief executive officer The drive will be led by alumni
of a Jackson electric company, i volunteers through a nationwide
has also accepted membership on campaign organization which ul-
the National Executive Committee. timately will number more than
Recipient of the J.D. degree from 5000. He said advanced gifts and
the Law School in 1939, Aymond pledges in hand exceed $9 mil-
is a director of the Michigan lion.
Alumni Fund, and a member of _n.
the national committee of the
University's Law School Fund. ; S uonsors
H. Randall Wickes, a Saginaw
banker and civic leader, has also
joied the Na tinal Cnmmitt In t

The two leaders described the we would have heard about them,'W11"'cZ'qut'
main differences between their they agreed. vekfunds wasannounced several
groups as practical in nature. Sa- There have been no socialist1 weeks ago, he said
lita emphasized the necessity for organizations on the university Headquarters
the adoption of a "clear political campus since the Socialist Club A national headquarters for the
position" in his group. Chester faded from the scene two years fund-raising program has been
countered with the assertion that ago. Both Salita and Chester ex- established in Detroit by the Uni-
his group would not seek to instill pressed optimism that each of versity, with offices in the First
"party discipline" and would not their groups would attract more National Building.
preach an "official party line." than 20 active members, the mini- Named to the committee were
He charged that the YSA is mum required for SGC recogni- David D. Hunting, Sr., chairman
"more interested in passing out tion. of the board of a furniture com-

4 lt L,it A, ~1VkiwulSa~tA ~l laAA . w SJl
1963, Wickes was awarded the
Delta College President's medal
for "distinguished service" to the
Tri-County area. He also is holder
of Saginaw's A r n o 1 d Bontell
Award for outstanding commun-
ity leadership.
Leland I. Doan, a Midland
chemical executive and former

.I
,I

Students for a Democratic So-
ciety is sponsoring a Student
March on Washington to call for
the end of American intervention
in the war in Viet Nam.
The march, set for Saturday,
April 17, will concide with stu-
dent Easter vacations.

Reforms
"America needs a radical change
and our group is interested in
mass struggle. We believe a socie-
ty should be created in which the
workers have greater power and
control over factories," Chester
said,.
4k
'U' Gets Grants
For Researci
The University has received'
nearly $400,000 in research grants
from the United States Public
Health Service, Rep. Weston Viv-
ian (D-Ann Arbor) announced
Tuesday.
The unrestricted research grants
include $38,792 to the School of
Dentistry, $117,492 to the School
of Public Health and $243,689 to
the Medical School.
The funds were given directly to
the schools, with the approval of
projects and their administration
being left to the schools them-
selves, thus eliminating remote
control from Washington as is
the case in the usual federal re-
search grants.

Party campaign for Clifton De-
Berry for president in the Novem-
ber elections. The YSA describes
itself in "fraternal solidarity" with
the Socialist Workers' Party, but
Salita said there was no direct
link between the two groups.
Salita said that the YSA dif-
fered from the ISC in its support
of the Negro Black Nationalist
movement, its active participation
in political campaigns and its
commitment to demonstrations in
support of Fidel Castro's Cuban
revolution and against the recent
U.S.-Belgian rescue mission in
the Congo.
More Radical .
On the other hand, Chester
claimed that the ISC will be
"more radical" than the YSA. He
I listed its basic concerns on cam-
pus reform in the areas of increas-
ed civil liberties and higher stu-
dent wages, and participation in
civil rights movements with em-
phasis on alleged police brutality
and slum conditions in the na-
tion's large cities.
Salita countered Chester's im-
plication that the YSA is less
"radical" than the ISC by listing
its recent actions: participation in
the Berkeley demonstrations, the

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