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January 16, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-16

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SATURDAY, 16 JANUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREW

SATURDAY, 16 JANUARY 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

N,.

Deny U.S. Attack

'On

Vietnamese

Air Raids on Laos Supply Routes
To Continue; No War 'Escalation'
WASHINGTON (MP-The United States intends to continue air
strikes against strategic targets on the Communist supply routes run-
ning through Laos into South Viet Nam. But officials yesterday de-
nied, publicly and privately, that there were any U.S. combat activities
over North Viet Nam.
The largest and most recent attack in Laos took place Wednesday,
when an important bridge was destroyed over the Nan Mat River
southeast of the road-junction town of Ban Ban. About two dozen
supersonic jet fighter-bombers, F-
100's and F-105's, swept down on
Seek T o B ar the bridge at the village of Ban
Sieng Mi. They were met by heavy
anti-aircraft fire from 50-caliber
V oters T est machineguns and 37-mm. cannon.
Two of the planes were shot ,down.
The two pilots were rescued.
WASHINGTON 0IP)-The Jus- Active
tice Department filed suit against The disclosure of active U.S.
the state of Alabama yesterday, combat operations against Com-
charging that its test for new vot- munist positions in the mountain-
ers is too difficult: ous jungles of Laos was followed
The suit, filed in United States by speculation that U.S. ships and
District Court, Montgomery, ask- planes were also engaged in ac-
ed that the tets be forbidden, and tual or potential combat activities
that all registration applicants over Communist North Viet Nam.
who were rejected on the basis Secretary of State Dean Rusk
of the test be placed on the voting told reporters no such operations
rolls. have been going on over North
The suit contends difficulty of Viet Nam. Sen. John Sparkman
the test makes it discriminatory. (D-Ala) was emphatic in deny-
This is the fourth statewide vot- ing reports to that effect.
ing discrimination suit brought by "We can plainly say we are not
the department. escalating the war," Sparkman,
Acting Atty. Gen. Nicholas Kat- acting chairman of the Senate
zenbach said the suit names as Foreign Relations Committee, told
defendants the state of Alabama newsmen after Rusk had appear-
and its secretary of state, who ed at a closed committee session.
provides application forms and Basis
tests to registrars in the state's Asked whether there is any bas-
67 counties. is for stories to the effect that
The suit charges that the test the U.S. has provided air cover
violates the U.S. Constitution and for South Vietnamese strikes in
the Civil Rights Acts of 1957, 1960 North Viet Nam, Sparkman said
and 1964. "some of the stories coming out
Katzenbach said the new test is are not accurate." He declined to
more difficult than tests or stand- elaborate.
ards applied to persons who were Privately, State Department of-
registered in the past, and that ficials said the 1962 Geneva agree-
this violates the 1964 rights law. ment, which was supposed to guar-
Thesuit says the effect is to antee the neutrality of Laos, had
freeze the present racial imbal- been violated constantly by Com-
ance of Alabama's voting struc- munist North Viet Nam, supported
ture, since more whites than Ne- by Communist China.
groes were registered in the past Sparkman commented yester-
under less difficult standards. day that "there have been air
The revised test, prescribed by operations in Laos for six months."
the Alabama Supreme Court a Some of the U.S. air strikes,
year ago, and revised last August which have been stepped up in re-
because of enactment of the new cent months, are reported to have
rights law, went into general use hampered the movement of Com-
in September. munist supplies and reinforce-
Katsenbach said the test, which ments into Laos. But the major
has 100 variations, consists of four purpose has been to slow down
questions on government, four on North Vietnamese assistance to
the U.S. Constitution, and a dic- Communist guerrillas fighting the
tation test involving excerpts from U.S. - supported government of
the Constitution. South Viet Nam.
World News RoundupC

Press for 'Malaysia Leaders Challenge
Arm Uni- Sukarno Peace Statement
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (A)-Prime Minister Tunku Abdul
Rahman and other Malaysian leaders challenged President Sukarno
n ew of Indonesia yesterday to prove he wants peace with Malaysia. They
made it plain they would not be easily convinced.
The leader of this anti-Communist federation praised support
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Malaysia has received from Britain, Australia and New Zealand, its
Lyndon B. Johnson urged Congress Commonwealth allies, and pledged "we will spare no money, time
yesterday to continue the United or energy in strengthening our ----------- --
States Arms Control and Disarm- defenses." -
ament Agency another four years Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minis-j
to helpd intensify ourpefforts" as ter Tun Abdul Razak announced,
the leadercm the "purposeful pur- Britain is sending still more mili--
uit of peace."tary reinforcements "at our re- Il/I -* i
His request for prompt action quest." p
got a generally warm welcome on

By LAURA GODOFSKY
Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON - A federal ;
scholarship program that would
aid up to 140,000 students next "
year heads the 160 million dollar
education program President Lyn-
don B. Johnson has presented to,
the 89th Congress this year.
Approval by spring of the schol-
arship program and Johnson's,
other education measures was pre-
dicted by Congressional and edu--
cation leaders.F
Rep. Adam Clayton Powell (D-!
NY) the chairman of the House
Education and Labor Committee,
is aiming for subcommittee ap-
proval by mid-Feburary, and full
committee approval by March 1.
Rules Committee
If the HouseRules Committee,
which schedules committee-ap-
proved bills for floor debate, does REPRESENTATIVE POWELL
not act on the education measure Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore)
in 21 days, Powell plans to take chairman of the Senate Labor and
advantage of the new House rulePch Wlfan enmtea d
that will enable him to by-pass Publi Welfare Committee, said
the committee and call the bill hearings on the bill would start
directly to the floor. Jan. 26 and would probably last

three weeks. He thought the edu-
cation measure might come to the
floor during the first two weeks
of March. The possibility that this
year's huge Democratic gains in
the House might prove temporary
could explain the speed of plan-
ned action.
According to Powell, "what we
don't pass in Congress we prob-
ably won't be able to pass in the
next generation."
Other Measures
The scholarship program will be
augmented by several other huge
aid measures:
-Expansion of the work-study
program initiated this year under
the Economic Opportunity Act of
1964. Work-study aid, which is
currently restricted to students
from low income families, would
ge extended to greater numbers
of students and to students from
middle income families.
--Partial federal payment of
interest on guaranteed private
loans.
-Expanded aid to medical stu-
dents.

Seek Expanded Education AidI

Capitol Hill, with predictions that
his recommendations will be ap-
proved in just about the form he'
asked. There was only a ripple of
protest and a comment by Sen.
George D. Aiken (R-Vt) that the;
four years might be cut back to,

British Confirmation j
A Defense Ministry in London, JACKSON, Miss. (,)-A federal
confirming the announcement, grand jury returned 84 indict-
said about 1000 men will be in- ments yesterday without reveal-
volved. He described the movement' ing if any of them resulted from
as a nonurgent rotational oper- the slaying of three Mississippi
ation to be completed in about civil rights workers last summer.E
six weeks. Names of those indicted, as well
Sukarno told a news conference as the charges, were a closely
in Jakarta Thursday he would guarded secret pending arrests by
abide by a United Nations deci- United States marshals.
sion to solve the Malaysia question The grand jury spent two days
peacefully despite Indonesia's an- iertndekr ng whatdtys
nounced withdrawal from the earlier this week hearing what the
orncd witdrdJustice Department called impor-
world body. tant new evidence. This evidence
Requests Withdrawal reportedly included two eyewit-
Razak called for Sukarno to pull ness accounts of the triple slay-
his troops back from the Borneo ings.
frontier with Malaysia and halt More than 50 other cases, many
his guerrilla campaign inside Ma- of them involving relatively mi-
laysian territory. nor liquor violations, also were
These suggestions were parried studied by the 22 whites and one
in Jakarta by Indonesian Deputy Negro on the grand jury.
Premier Subandrio, who also is Victims of the June 21 killing
Sukarno's foreign minister. I near Philadelphia, Miss., were Mi-
Subandrio said Indonesia will chael Schwerner, 24, and Andrew
Goodman, 20, white New Yorkers,
continue to send raiders into - and James Chaney, 21-year-old
Britain and Malaysiaewhic is Negro from Meridian, Miss. The
made up of former British Colo- FBI termed the killings the work
nies, do not want a peaceful solu- of a Ku Klux Klan plot.
nieonThis same grand jury had re-
tion. fused last October to return any
At the same time he declared his indictments in the civil rights
government is ready to enter peace slaying.
talks without advance conditions. Two months later the govern-
ment announced it had uncover-
S ed additional evidence and arrest-
Pro m ise Arm ed 21 white men. Those picked up
included Neshoba County Sheriff
To EC ongolese Lawrence Rainey and his deputy,
Cecil Price.
The 21 were subsequently freed
CAIRO (P)-The Congo rebels after an alleged confession by one
have won promises of additional of them was ruled inadmissible at
arms and other help from Cairo a preliminary hearing.
and Algiers in secret sessions here,
usually reliable African sources
said yesterday.
P dtG Cml AhdI1 N I

ON CAMPUS ONLY!
All Barbershop Members
Will Close Jan.16, 1965

PRESIDENT JOHNSON

I
C'
,

two
Johnson is expected to ask for
$55 million to run the agency over
the next four years, with stepped-
up disarmament research.
First Agency
Noting that four years ago the
United States became the first
nation to establishan arms con-
trol and disarmament agency, he
said its "record of achievement
since has refuted the doubts of
those who questioned whether
there was effective work for such
an agency to perform."
"While the journey toward
peace remains long," Johnson said,
''we have begun to take the first
steps-and we have found others
of the family of nations willing to
walk with us."
Director Comments
The President's letter to House
and Senate was accompanied by
one from agency director William
C. Foster saying:
"The work of the arms control
and disarmament agency has be-
come an integral part of our over-
all national security' . . . arma-
ments alone can no longer in-
crease security; the unchecked in-
crease of these weapons of mass
destruction can only diminish our
safety..."
Foster said new authority 'is
needed because the agency does
not have funds to continue be-
yond the end of the present fis-
cal year, June 30.1
B'nai B'rith Hil

and Every

Saturday Thereafter.

BARBERSHOPS OPEN Mon.-Fri.
8:30-5:30
TO BETTER SERVE YOU
THANK YOU
Washtenaw- Barbers Assn.

li

rresiaernt amai aei Nasser,
of the United Arab Republic and
President Ahmed Ben Bella of Al-
geria are ardent supporters of the
rebels, who also have Communist
backing in their war against Pre-
mier Moise Tshombe's Leopold-
ville government.
The sources said unspecified
quantities of arms-including ri-
fles, grenades and ammunition -
have been promised from both
the UAR and Algeria.
In addition, they said, Nasser's
government has pledged $250,000
in financial aid, and Algeria has
an unspecified number of volun-
teers ready to reform the rebel;
ranks.t
Ilel Foundation

co)ME

(0)

C HURCH~
ZABj3r BA tH

By The Associated Press
JOHNSON CITY, Tex. - The
United States and Canada have
reached an agreement to end tar-
iffs on automobiles and parts for
production of new motor vehicles.
The agreement was announced
simultaneously in Austin, Tex., Ot-
tawa and Washington.
* * *
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania -
President Julius Nyerere yesterday
charged two top United States dip-
lomats with subversive activities
and ordered them to get out of
this East African country within
24 hours.
They were Embassy Counsellor
Robert Gordon-No. 2 man here
and believed to be the highest
ranking U.S. diplomat ever order-
ed out of a post with so little no-
tice-and Frank C. Carlucci III,
consul at Zanzibar.
COLUMBIA, S.C. - South Car-
olina's dominant Democratic par-
ty was caught flat-footed when,
Rep. Albert Watson (D-SC) an-
nounced he would resign from'
Congress to seek re-election as a
Republican. Democrats have no
candidate to run against Watson
and finances are low.
Returns of recent elections in-
dicate Watson's defection from the
Democratic party was probably a
popular move with most voters in!
his congressional district.
WASHINGTON-Industrial pro-
duction, paced by the automotive
industry, rose sharply in Decem-
ber, the Federal Reserve 'Board
said yesterday.
The biggest gain was in auto-
mobile production, followed by tel-
evision sets, but the board said
output also increased in most oth-
er major industries.
The board reported that produc-
tion in December was 37 per cent
higher than the 1957-59 average.
The rate of production was 8
per cent above December 1963, and
for the year industrial output was
6 per cent above 1963.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Labor De-
partment reported yesterday "a
very strong picture" in the na-

tion's employment situation last3
month, particularly in construc-
tion and manufacturing.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
said the December figures round-
ed out a generally good year in
which total employment was up 15
million from 1963, the biggest an-
nual increase since 1959.
* * *
GREENVILLE, M is s. - The
Greenville school board has voted
unanimously to prepare a desegre-
gation plan to comply with the
Civil Rights Act and its clause
affecting federal aid.
Greenville, in the heart of Mis-
sissippi's rich cotton-growing del- -
ta, faces the loss of $272,000 in
federal education funds if it fails
to comply with the civil rights law:
* * *
WASHINGTON-Freshman Rep.!
John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich) has
been selected as a member of the
House Judiciary Committee, be-
coming the first Negro to serve on
the committee which handles Civil
Rights legislation.
* * 4
WASHINGTON-John T. Con-
nor, President Lyndon B. John-
son's first cabinet appointee, won
the Senate's voice vote approvalI
yesterday to become the new sec-,
retary of commerce.
Not a dissenting voice was rais-'
ed as the approving vote cleared
the way for Connor to succeed
Secretary Luther Hodges, who has
submitted his resignation.

Announces a
Schedule Change:
The Hebrew Class Is Now Meeting
MONDAYS at 8 P.M.

i
k
i
t i

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 o.m.--Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Canterbury House.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY
9:15 a.m.-Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 1 1:15: Services, with Ser-
mon by the Pastor, "The Response to God's
Mercy." (Holy Communion Both Services)
Sunday at 11 :15: Bible Class, "Baptism"
Sunday at 5:15: Gamma Delta meets at Chap-
el to go to Concordia campus for supper
and program, '"Christianity in 1984."
Monday at 8:00: First meeting of weekly
class, "Systematic Theology in Miniature."
Completion of course prepares for com-
municant membership. Text: "Let's Study
Theology," by H. Reimann.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Midweek Devotion,
Vicar Stephen Stein, "I Doubt It"

Registrations Accepted Until Jan. 21
1429 Hill St.

(H E

663-4129

SAT., JAN. 16
UNION BALLROOM
9:00-12: 00 P. M.
ART BARTNER & ORCHESTRA
FREE ADMISSION
Sponsored by:
International Students Assn.
Union, League

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-453 6
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Campus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert-"Decisive Moments in Our Re.-
ligious -History: The Burning Bush."
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Social Hall,
with School of Missions panel of Interna-
tional students.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. "Impressions of Quadrennial Con-
ference," panel of students.
TUESDAY
12:00 noon-Class, Pine Room. "Christian
Dating, Courtship and Marriage," Dr. Ran-
som. Lunch 25c.
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. "The Preaching Ministry,"
Dr. Hoover Rupert. Dinner free.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Bissell's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, follow-
ed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in time
for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion,. Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Dinner
in Social Hall, program following.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Class, Wesley Lounge. "Shapers
of Contemporary Protestant Thought," Mrs.
-Bissell. Lunch 25c.
FRIDAY
6:30 p.m.-Young Marrieds. Interchurch Pot-
luck and Square Dance at First Congrega-
tional Church. Phone NO 8-6881 for res-
ervations.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services--8:30 and 11:15 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:45 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRIST IAN CHURCH
730 Tappan-662-4245
Russell M. Fuller-Pastor
Sunday Worship-10:45 a.m.
Monday: Buffet Luncheon at 12 noon. "That
Was The Week That Was."
CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe-662-5189
J. E. Edwards-Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar on Historic
Christian Thought.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth'St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev. A. G. Hobermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron 663-9376
9:45 a.m., "Psychology and Religion"
11:00 a.m., Worship, First Baptist Church
7:00 p.m., Lecture and Discussion, "The The-
ology of Barth and Brunner; An Adequate
Foundation for Christian Social Ethics?" Dr.
N. Patrick Murray
Paul W. Light - Campus Minister
James H. Middleton-Senior Minister
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.--Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.

11

1000 TO 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words
a minute. And retention is excellent., This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read
every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will allow you to accomplish-in your
required reading and also in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED
READING method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external
equipment in reading.
A class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught on Tuesday evenings at the

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For transportation call 662-4018.
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m:;
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. and S. Forest Ave.
Pastors: Henry 0. Yoder
Norman A. Erikson
SUNDAY
9:30 & 11:00 a.m., Worship Services
9:30 a.m., Bible Study
7:00 p.m., "The Role of the Family in the

I

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the

Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Calf

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses at_6:30, 7:00,

: .sw... Etwwswa e Alf

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