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April 14, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, 14 APRIL 1965

PAGE TWO THE MIChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, 14 APRIL 196~

IBM Interviewer

Teaching Fellowships Increase UMSEU To Expand Economic Activities

Explains Si
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
second in a two-part.series on the
Bureau of Appointments and Oc-
cupational Information.
By ILENE SIEGLER
This year over 1400 companies
and more than 600 educational
institutions will visit the Univer-
sity offering over 81,000 jobs to
University graduates.
Through the Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational In-
formation, company representa-
tives can interview prospective
employees and students can in
turn get information about the
company.
Branch Manager of Interna-
tional Business Machines John
A. Lloyd explained what a com-
panya looks for when selecting
students.
"I see the interview situation as
a two-way proposition, in which
the student is trying to sell him-
self to the company and the in-
terviewer is trying to sell his
firm to the student," Lloyd said.
He is interested in hiring a per-
son, not an auomaton, to fill a
position. The purpose of the in-
terview is to find out as much
about the individual as the inter-
viewer possibly can. Lloyd sees a
year of an individual's life as
more important than the invest-
ment the company would make
in him.

tandards
The interviewer notices many
things. In order to help categor-
ize a person, Lloyd asks "leading
questions" and watches for the
way a person will react to the
situation.
He notices such things as ap-
pearance, alertness, enthusiasm,
poise, intelligence, maturity and
leadership, which he feels are im-
portant indications of a person's
character.
Lloyd's questions all lead to-
ward his major preoccupation,
"Does the student have the abil-
ity to think logically?"
"I expect the student to partic-
ipate in his interview as honestly
as possible," Lloyd said. If the
first impression is a successful
one, usually a second interview
and a set of specific exams is ar-
ranged for the student. Lloyd al-
so expressed the idea of having
prospective employees spend some
time on the job to get a better
idea of what the work involves.
Though the interviews are pri-
marily for graduating seniors,
Lloyd expressed a willingness to
speak to any student interested
in IBM, regardless of his year, to
help him decide if the interest is
well founded and profitable.
Lloyd sees the Bureau as an
excellent opportunity for both the
student and the employer to
make the best possible choice.

By LILLI VENDIG

(Continued from Page 1)

There is a growing awareness of,

t__.. :... :.... ..,. _...,.1 ...,.... 4.--4..11...7

hour in is frst earwhil inthe responsibility for having well- 1
hours in his first year, while in trained teaching fellows in under-
the foreign languages he gener- graduate courses. Toward this
ally instructs eight hours per end, departments have established
Work Hours various courses and methods to,
Between2ours p improve supervision and instruc-
Between 15 and 20 hours per to
week is generally associated with tion.
teaching responsibilities, depend- In the English department,i
ing on the number of courses be- Prof. Hubert M. English Jr. esti-
ing taught. Out of class work mated that about half of the new
consists of grading, conferences teaching fellows each year have
and meetings with faculty mem- had previous teaching experience,
bers. In addition the teaching either in high school or college. A
fellow h a s regular graduate required course in the teaching of
courses as part of the doctoral college English was disbanded
program. several years ago and the present
Announce'65 Winter Te rm
Final Examination Schedule
MONDAY

training system was installed.
Faculty Supervision The Student Employes' Union
is expanding into several areas of
Under this method, four teach- student interest in addition to
ing fellows of freshman English wage increases, according to presi-
are under the supervision of a dent Barry Bluestone, '66.
faculty member who visits them, I'oti
helps them in grading and offers It is now going to organzations
them guidance. During the next such as Assembly House Council,
three semesters, the teaching fel- Interquadrangle Council and Voice
low is given a different faculty Political Party, which have ex-
supervisor, who occasionally ob- pressed an interest in the Admin-
serves the class and aids the in- istration "White Paper" on eco-
structor. nomic policy, the statement of the
administration~'spito onsu

they will explore the University's
investment policy. The University
at present has investments in
many American businesses, such
as the Alabama Power Company
and American Telephone and
Telegraph, Bluestone said. UMSEU
is exploring the possibility of al-
ternative investments, including
investment in student services. If
the University were to invest in
housing, it could bring lower costs
to the students.
To Reduce Prices
UMSEU will negotiate with the
campus book stores to reduce
prices or give students a discount.
At the same time, Bluestone said
they will ask the University to
sponsor a bookstore in a Univer-

sity building. They are also work-
ing with the state Legislature in
the hope of receiving appropria-
tions for this project.
A UMSEU committee, under
direction of Gail Smiley, '67, is
working on a job survey booklet
this summer. It will include the
types of jobs available, their pay
scale, the number of hours a stu-
dent must work and the job pre-
requisites. It will contain advice
for the student on where to go
and whom to see for a specific
job.
According to Bluestone, they
will also attempt to persuade the
University to build nonsupervised
apartments similar to those in
Oxford.

f_

In the German department, the
teaching fellows meet weekly and
are directed by two faculty sup-
ervisors. In mathematics, begin-
ning teaching fellows are given
an instructive manual and are
associated with a mentor, an older
faculty member who can lead
assistance. The chemistry depart-
ment conducts a one week train-
ing session in recitation and lab
procedure.

administration's position on stu-
dent economic welfare for which
UMSEU has recently been press-
ing.
UMSEU is planning a full sum-
mer program. It will attempt to
bring off-campus wages up to the
federal and University minimum
wage of $1.25 per hour. It plans
to use direct action, such as
picketing, if negotiations bring no
results.
UMSEU will also do intensive
research in the area of student
econmic welfare, such as housing
rents and book, food and clothing
prices. In addition, Bluestone said

Time

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4

A
B
C
D
Q
E
F
G
R

Tues., April 20.........
Wed., April 21.........
Thurs., April 22........

Fri., April
Mon., April
Sat., April
Mon., April
Tues., April
Sat., April

23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
26 . ...............
24 ............. .
26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
27 .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. ..
24 ... ..... . ......
TUESDAY

Exam
Central Campusxa
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
. 8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
. 8:00-10:00
. 8:00-10:00
. 10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30

Several departments including
botany and political science lack
North Campus a formal training program for new
7:30- 9:30 teaching fellows.
7:30- 9:30
7:30- 9:30
7:30- 9:30IN NE
WINNE
10:30-12:30
7:30- 9:30
7:30- 9:30 ACAI
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30 "

0 F 3
)EMY
LRDS!

I

Time

Exam
Central Campus North Campus

U

AWA

Center Studies Information
System, Closed Societies

#8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4

H
I
J
K
S
M
N
p
T

Sat., April 24.. . . . . . . .
Fri., April 23.. . . . . . . .
Thurs., April 22................ .
M on., April 26..... ...........
Fri., April 23 .................
W ed., April 21.................
Tues., April 20 .................
Sat., April 24.................
Thurs., April 22.................

1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12:30
4:00- 6:00
4:00- 6:00
4:00- 6:00
10:30-12:30

1:30- 3:30
1:30- 3:30
1:30-13:30
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12 :30
4:30- 6:30
4:30-16:30
4:30- 6:30
10:30-12:30

(Continued from Page 1)
which he is currently engaged-
what would be necessary for a
reapprochment between China and
the United States. This project is
sponsored by t h e American
Friends Service Center. One con-
clusion of the committee was that
opinion toward China in the U.S.
is not realistic.
America's at t i t u d e toward
China is negative; he said. This
is because each country finds it
difficult to form realistic images
of the other-a factor partly due
to the fact that they belong to
different streams of history and
also because of political distortion
of the information system.
Boulding explained that U.S. re-
assurance that Americans realize
the Chinese Communist govern-
ment is stable is needed to bring
about a rapproachment. He added
that the U.S. will have to come to
terms over the problem of Taiwan.
To the Chinese the problem is
much like the British support of
the South in the War Between the
States, he said.
Testing Reality
Other research being done on
testing reality, involves what hap-
pens in a closed unit of society
when there is no means of com-
paring what an individual is told
with reality.
Merril Jackson, research social
psychologist at the conflict center,
is working on a theory that would
also explain what happens when
channels of communication are
available to this close group.
Jackson's research is concerned
with studying aspects of society
which Jackson says are not as in-
tensively studied as other aspects.
These include northern, urban
Negro ghettos, state mental hos-
pitals and state prisons.
Social Units
Jackson is interested in social
units which are closed to outside
influence. These units are com-
posed so that there is no way to
check a conception of reality with
other :influences.
Jackson illustrated this with an
example of a mental hospital. In
the ideal situation patients are
encouraged not to doubt, he said.
They are taught to accept certain
ideas of how things are. Eventual-
ly they come to believe them.
Admittedly the system has to
be closed for a long period of
time, he said. However, the way
this situation operates, it is al-
most as if people must have a
"story" merely describing what

they take for granted in order to
live "normally."
To support his theory, Jackson
described an experiment run on
sensory deprivation. Subjects in
this experiment were placed in a
room which had no windows and
only necessary furniture. Meals
were given at irregular times. Stu-
dents used in this experiment had
expectations of staying in these
conditions for the entire summer
as a form of a summer job. The
longestrany student stayed in the
situation was two days, Jackson
explained.
One of the first things that
happened was the subjects lost
all sense of time. Next, subjects
began to have hallucinations. The
hallucination is significant, Jack-
son explained, because it was this
which gave the subject a meaning
or "story" of what he was doing
in there. Subjects made up these
stories to make their life mean-
ingful.
Sensory deprivation tests show,
Jackson said, that if things were
all the same, then a person has a
tendency to make them randomly
different. The same effect is in-
duced if you keep things com-
pletely irregular; the individual
will give a regularity or meaning
to random happenings. If an in-
dividual continues to live in this
type of situation, he beings to lose
touch with reality.
In a group deprivation situa-
tion, Jackson continued, rumors
start. If a story is lacking, assum-
ing that people need to under-
stand their life, then people will.
eventually start to believe these
rumors even if it is contrary to
their own interests.

Special Periods
Each course, except English 123 and 220, requiring a specialj
examination, is assigned two examination code letters. If one is
preferred by the department, it is in boldface type; students may
elect the other only if a conflict occurs and special permission is
secured from the department.
Special Periods Schedule

"'ZORBA THE GREEK'
IS A DECIDED
MUST-SEE!
Anthony Quinn's Zorba
possesses all the energies
and urges of the great ones
of history and myth.".
-Bosley Crowther, New York Tmes
"A grand uproarious
Bacchanalian bash."
Time Mogazinb
"Anthony Quinn, best actor
of the year! Zorba, one of
the year's 10 best!"
-National Board of Review
"1964's finest film."
-Soturday Review

LESS THAN
1f
2 WEEKS
AWAY'I
At 8:00 pm. on April 22, 23, and 24,
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre will present
the smash hit comedy-mystery
SHOT
IN THE
DARK
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre-
so for best seats, order now
with this coupon.
Mail To: A A Civic Theatre, Box 1993, Ann Arbor u
* r
No. of tickets Thursday, April 22 ($1.50) i
Friday, April 23 ($1.75)
desired for: Saturday, April 24 ($1.75)
r Total amount enclosed:
* U
Name:-
r I
Address:
(Please enclose stamped self-addressed envelope if you wish
-tickets mailed to you.)
mi mmrrrrr mm m mm m mmu w mmmm m mm.mm m mmmm m mm m mmmm

1
x

I

"

Delta. .Wed.,April 21...
L......TWed., April 21. .
0 ...... Tues., April 27 ..
Pi...... Tues., April 27..
U...... Tues., April 20 ...
Phi.. . . Tues., April 20 ...
V. . . .Thurs., April 22 ...
W.......Fri., April 23 ..
X.....Tues., April 27..
Y ....Mon., April 26 ...
Z.....To be arranged

Central Campus
.~10:30-12:30
. ........... 1:30- 3:30
4:00- 6:00
.8:00-10:00
.. .. ........ 1:30- 3:30
.............10:30-12:30
.4:00- 6:00
............. 4:00- 6:00
1:30- 3:30
.4:00- 6:00

North Campus
10:30-12:30
1:30- 3:30
4:30- 6:30
7:30- 9:30
1:30- 3:30
10:30-12:30
4:30- 6:30
4:30- 6:30
1:30- 3:30
4:30- 6:30,

i

School of Business Administration
4'ourse Examination Code Letter
Accounting 271, 500 ........S,W
Accounting 272, 501........L,V
Bus. Admin. 306, 506 . ... Delta,T
Bus. Admin. 450.....Phi, Delta
Finance 301 ................S,W
Indust. Rel. 300, 500 ........ U,N
Marketing 300, 301, 500, 501 V,Y
Statistics 311, 511............T,P
Statistics 505 .............. S,W
College of Engineering
Eng. Graphics 101 .... Phi, Delta
Eng. Graphics 102, 104 ...... U,L
Literary College
Chemistry 104, 106 ........ Pi,O
Economics 101, 102, 103, 104,
401 ..................O,X
Economics 271 .............. S,W
Economics 272 ..............L,V
English 123, 220 ............. L
French 101, 102, 103, 111, 112,
221, 222, 231, 232, 361,
362 ....................U ,M
Shows at
1, 3,5,7 and 9P.M.
Feature 15 Minutes Later

German 101, 102, 111, 231,
232, 236 .......... . ..Phi, T
Italian 101, 102 .......... Phi, T
Latin 103, 221, 222 .....NU
Mathematics 115, 116 .......V,W
Physics 154 ................Y,Q
Psychology 380 .... .......... Y,X
Russian 101, 102, 201, 202,
302, 402 ................S,R
Russian 352 .............. Phi, T
Russian 452 ................ M,V
Sociology 380 ............ , . Y,X
Spanish 101, 102, 103, 221,
222, 231, 232 ........ Delta, T

ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES IRENE PAPAS
MICHAEL CACOYANNIS PRODUCTION
"ZORBATHE GREEK"
ewa~Kr, 'ld I . l,1 4"Nfr. ,.uA W '44*I CACOMNI S
. NtI T& ATIONAL CLASSCS 'RfSf NTATION

x
f

I

STARTS
THURSDAY

dom

SHOWS AT
6:40 & 9:08

Dead andI Use Daily Classified Ads

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Phone 761-0001
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I III V"

PRESENTS
THlE COMPANY
ElsRabb. Artistic Directom

DIAL 662-6264

Shown at 1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00
Feature Starts
25 Minutes Later

.
11

rrrm lo.... .
RpoiCUDSON "Gina WLLOMWGIDA
GigYOUNG
"STRVANGE BEDFELLOW".
TECHNICOLOR*

TODAY THRU SATURDAY

4 THFALL FESTIVAL
PRIOR TO BROADWAY
it

$

1

PLAY A

YOU CAN'T

ENDS TONIGHT
"WILD AS A
TRAIN I A
FRUNWA
-New York Times
.GittQ

FRIDAY--"MAJOR DUNDEE"
UAC
MUSKET
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE FOLLOWING MEMBERS OF ITS
NEW CENTRAL COMMITTEE

t

TAKE IT WITH YOU
The funniest American Comedy!
by George S. KaIfman & Moss Hart Directed by Ellis Rabb
P TAE WILD DUCK
The poignant dramatic classic.
byHenrik Ibsen Directed by Stephen Porter
WORL.DPREMIERE!
PLAY C HERAKLES
The Pulitzer Prize dramatist's provocative new play.
by Archibald MacLeish Directed by Alan Schneider

NEW YORK CRITICS
HAIL APA!
" VWar i Peace' a triumph"
LIFE
"The best repertory company in
New York" N.Y. Daily News
"The best ofar hopes...
Remarkable ... Stunning."
Kerr, N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Exhilarating ... mature theatre
a joy." Taubman, N.Y. imes
"The finest repertory company
in America." New Yorket

'{

I

I

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE September 28 - November 14
h a. .. - ---. -auls -is satILIIIHIII - e um um -- - o g ns

°
t

DIRECTOR:
Jack Rouse

MUSIC:
Bruce Fisher
PUBLICITY:
Vicki Hedge

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR:
Rebecca Rapport

SCHEDULE
1 -,i- i 1 - '
..r... ,, ca sr xrt u f l U T. I' Ift P" M

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