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January 13, 1965 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-13

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, 13 JANUARY 19-65

PAGE SL~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, 13 JANUARY 1905

,.

MOVE CALLED HASTY:
AFL Critizied for Game Shift

Improved Underdogs

Tighten Cage Race

By The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS-Mayor Victor'
Schiro stated yesterday that AFL
Commissioner Foss acted hastily
in removing the AFL All-Star
game from New Orleans "after3
hearing only one side without per-I
sonally investigating all of the an-
gler, involved."
The Negroes, continued Mayor
Schiro "have done themselves and
their race a disservice by precipi-
tous action."
"If these men would play foot-
ball only in cities where every-
body loved them, they'd all be out;
of a job today. Their reaction will,
only aggravate the very condi-
tion they are seeking, in time, to
eliminate. We are a very cosmo-
politan and tolerant city, but we
are also a Southern city, and thereI
are times when personal reaction
is unpredictable.-
No Previous Trouble1
"Our experience thus far with
integrated football, basketball and1
even track meets has been excep-

By SCOTT BLECH
tionally good. In fact, there hasn't "We all agreed that the game A pre-season look at Big Ten
been a single personal incident should be played if at all possi- basketball showed that Wisconsin
that I know of in this connection. ble. We sympathize with the prob- would have trouble defeating any-
"The Syracuse football team in lem of the Negro players and want one and Iowa would not be much
the Sugar Bowl with eight Ne- them to be in the game. better.
groes in the lineup is a case m "From what we could gather The Big Ten was supposed to,
point. All of them left here prais- there were eight separate and dis- be a race between Michigan, Illi-
ing the hospitality and kindness tinct cases of discrimination. nois and Minnesota. So what hap-
of New Orleans 'people." These included transportation, re- pens--Indiana enters the scene
The game first scheduled on fusal of admittance to clubs with an undefeated non-confer-
Saturday i New Orleans was can- name-calling and things like that. ence record.
celled after 22 Negro players re-
ThP W ttr ConfPrnP b kt-

Jones is a big help to center
George Peeples who is quickly be-
coming a big-name center. Pee-
ples was named to the Classic's
All-Tournament team and scored
22 points in Iowa's loss to Wiscon-
sin Monday night.
The key to the Iowa attack this
season is Cris Pervall, a guard
who transferred from Coffeeville
(Kan) Junior College.
The Hawkeyes, however, ran in-'
to trouble Monday night as the
Indiana Hoosiers put a halt to a
late Iowa scoring surge. The Hoos-
iers who have also stopped North-
western have only lost to Illinois
this season. The dangerous Hoos-

fused to play because of racial
discrimination. Later it was moved
to Houston.
Tommy Addison, Boston line-
backer and president of the Ameri-
can Football League Player Asso-
ciation, says:
Already Gone
"Most of the Negro players had
already left town before we first
heard that they had voted not to
play in the game.hI called a meet-
ing because I felt it was our duty!
to let the commissioner and thej
owners know how the representa-
tives of all eight teams felt about
the thing.

Wanted to Stay1
"I do know that nearly half ofI
the Negro players wanted to play !
the game here in New Orleans de-;
spite what happened."
Commented Patriots' teammate
Bob Dee: "It's a general feel-,
ing of regret that all the white
players feel. I personally have nev-t
er encountered anything like this,
and it's a rotten shame that it
has caused so much trouble.
"But we're all in this together7
and certainly those boys are with-
in their rights."

.lle WesG. eY n. n ' e enlce. Las e-
ball season is very young and the
basketball prophets around the
Midwest are finding it more and.
more difficult to pick the winners.

The big story at Iowa City is ier full-court zone press and tall
two newcomers and an improved starting five have made the dif-
center. The Hawkeyes have al- ference. Tom and Dick Van Ars-
ready defeated Wisconsin and dale are the 6'5" forwards; cen-
Michigan State and topped Minne- ter Ron Peyser stands 6'8"; Jon
sota in the Los Angeles Classic. McGlocklin (6'") and Steve Red-
Another Cazzie? enbaugh (6') round out the
Gerry Jones, a 6'4" forward lineup.
from Chicago's Carver High Surprise Five
School, is starting to look like Wisconsin surprised Purdue
former Carver star Cazzie Russell Monday night with Keith Stelter,
in the rebounding department. a 6'8" 'sophomore, delivering 18
points in the 77-66 victory. Davej

entertain the Minnesota Gophers.
Getting Better
Minnesota is once again led by
Lou Hudson, a forward who is
improving every game. Hudson
also made the All-Los Angeles
Classic Tournament team and has
averaged about 21 points per game
this season. The Gophers, with
returnees Archie Clark, Don Yates
and Mel Northway, seem to miss
Terry Kunze. Kunze, who was ear-
lier dismissed from the team for
illegal academic activities, has
been replaced by Dennis Dvoracek,
Ohio State with Dick Ricketts
and Michigan State with Stan
Washington and Marcus Sanders
have 0-1 Big Ten records and do
not figure to be contenders as they
have been in the past.
Green 'Cats
The sophomore-laden North-
western Wildcats host the Wolver-
ines Saturday and have been
working to fill the center posi-
tion. Veteran Jim Pitts has been
plagued by chronic arthritis in his
knees and junior John Printen is
now ineligible.
The Wildcats have been paced
by high school All Americans Jim
Burns, 6'4" guard, Ron Kozlicki,
6'6" forward, and Walt Tiberi, 6'1"
guard. Returnee Don Jackson and
sophomore Rich Mason are also
counted on by Coach Larry Glass
to play important roles in the
Northwestern attack.
In other Big Ten action Satur-
day, Michigan State and Iowa
battle on regional television and
Indiana faces Ohio State. Iowa
and Indiana encounter in the only
conference game next Monday.
Purdue hosts Notre Dame on Tues-
day, Jan. 19.

5
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7
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DEMONSTRATION
1000 TO 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
You cOn read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words
a minute. And retention is excellent. This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read
every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature. and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will allow you to accomplish-in your
required reading and also in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED
READING method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external
equipment in reading.
A class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught on Tuesday evenings at the
Michigan Union beginning February 16, 1965.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
method and see it applied.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the Michigan Union on:
Wednesday, January 13 at 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday, January 20 at 7:30 P.M.
National School of Accelerated Reading, Inc.

THE VAN ARSDALE TWINS, Tom (left) and Dick are two good
reasons why Indiana's Hoosiers are the fifth ranked team in the
country. A muscular pair of 6'5" forwards, the twins have started
in every single Indiana game since becoming eligible two seasons
ago
TOPS AGAIN:
Newc Faces Spark
UCLA* Tie Drive.

Free to
Michigan
Students-
25o to others
A new booklet, published by a
non-profit educational founda-
tion, tells which career field lets
you make the best use of all
your college training, including
liberal-arts courses-which
career field offers 100,000 new
jobs every year - which career
field produces more corporation
presidents than any other-what
starting salary you can expect.
Just send this ad with your name
and address. This 24-page,
career-guide booklet, "Oppor-
tunities in Selling," will be
mailed to you. No cost or obli-
gation. Address: Council on Op-
portunities, 5 50 Fifth Ave.. New
York 36, N. Y., 'UM1-11

Shellhase, who averaged 24.5
points per game last season, once
again paced the Boilermakers,
scoring 30. The lanky forward is;
fourth in the country in scoring,
with a game average of over 31
points.
Illinois, another team to be
reckoned with, found the ,going
rough in Ann Arbor Saturday, but
has defeated Wisconsin and Indi-
ana as a result of top perform-
ances from Skip Thoren, Tal
Brody and Don Freeman. The Il-
lini will have to fight for, their,
lives again Saturday when they

1'p to daleJ -Aor darkime and dalelime

By RICH GOODMAN The Los Angeles Classic is a
Manyp ,i lookiprime example of Erickson at his
Many pcee, hi yokn at best. Against Minnesota he was
UCLA's success this year are be- the leader in every respect: he put
ginning to wonder if Walt Haz- UCLA out in front for good with
zard was really that good. successive steals and baskets.
A person who wants to try toMost Valuable
find a few concrete reasons for Mst Vlable
I And after UCLA won the tour-
UCLA's victories should look at nament for the third straight year,
the entire picture. First of all, it Erickson was named as its Most
is important to remember that
Hazzard was not an especially high
scorer. Gail Goodrich took the
honors last year with a 21.5 aver-
age, and he's back. Hazzard's main
contributions were playmaking
and that general term, ballhawk-
ing, which refers to good plain
basketball sense.
What have the Bruins got this
year to replace the sparkplug that
Walt Hazzard was? First of all,
the team is bigger than last year's
version. The average is 6'4" per
man. But the most significant ad-
dition is the new lineup for UCLA.
Good Old Gail
They still have Gail Goodrich,
the 61" great who consistently
scores over 20 points a game. But
the players that answer the ques-
tion about the 11-1 record that ..
the UCLAns have compiled so far
are more or less newcomers. GAIL GOODRICH
The three names that come un-
der this category are Fred Goss, Valuable Player.
Edgar Lacey, and a much improv- Ed Lacey is a 6'6" sophomore
ed Keith Erickson. Especially forward who leads the team in
prominent is Erickson, whose play- rebounding. In starting this year,
ing so far this year has prompted Lacey beat out Kenny Washington
speculation about him as a pos- who played so well in last year's
sible All-America candidate. NCAA finals against Duke. This is

t

i 18964 Coyle Street

Detroit 35, Michigan

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T ITTY!
D I
iDaily
Editor-in-Chief,
ntercol leg iate.
icial Bulletin.
tre and Concerts,
[ze.
7u Can Make a

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an indication of the rising young
team that Coach John Wooden
has this year.
Fred Goss is starting this year
after a year's absence from the
basketball court. He averages
around 15 points a game and is a
marksmanl from the free throw
line.
The fifth member of the team
is the center, Doug McIntosh who
is 6'6" and a fine pivot man. But,
again, McIntosh was not a starter
last year.
Classic Bruin
UCLA still retains its classic
style of play-the famous full
court press which hurt Minneso-
ta and Utah so much. And the fast
break is still an integral part of
the Bruins' strategy.
UCLA lost its first game, and
the defeat was a sure one. Illinois
beat them by a score of 110 to 83,
and Wooden made no excuses.
This game obviously helped the
team more than it hurt it. Utah's
Coach Jack Gardner, after see-
ing his team trounced 104-74, said
that UCLA is a better team than
last year's NCAA championship
team.
In commenting on his team
Wooden says, "I believe the team
is coming along in good shape,
with no surprises or disappoint-
ments at this stage.'We are mak-
ing steady progress."
UCLA is a young, strong team
with a great deal of potential.
And they are certainly making
steady progress.

;'.

KEITH ERICKSON
finest quality laundry-

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