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April 07, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'f YI~Tll1 W I W i'LT JIAIIV

W7ELI JM50~A K? 7APRIL 1965

5

ARTS and LETTERS By Kay Holmes
Science Confronts Authority

SACUA Approves Plan Phillips Says
To Restructure Senate Local Force

(Continued from Page 1)

zation is that discussions between

Rumor

Eight long years with tongue in
cheek
Of what he knew he did not
speak
Then temptation grew too great
And Galileo challenged fate.
As a scientist, as a man of con-
viction, and perhaps just as a
very pernacious personality, Gali-
leo Galilei would not be silenced
by seventeenth century social
pressure and determined instead
to introduce the knowledge he had
gained from his notorious tele-
scope
Bertolt Brecht uses the story of
this famous Italian scientist to
develop his study of freedom in
scientific inquiry in his play
"Galileo," which opens tonight in
Trueblood Auditorium, and will
run through April 10.
Presented by the University of
Michigan Players to climax their
1964/65 Playbill season, "Galileo"
is a dramatic-biography. Brecht,
considered one of the most in-
fluential minds of the twentieth
century, develops the problem of
scientific investigation opposed by
existing authority. Galileo must
decide if he is to. recant his
theories on the universe when they
area in conflict with the Church
and State.
Episodic
The play traces Gaiieo's life
from 1609 when he looked into his
telescope and found 'the solar sys-
tem, until 1642 when he died as
a prisoner of the Inquisition. Due
to this extended time span, the
play is necessarily episodic in na-
ture.
In posing a problem, the didactic
intent of the play is evident. How-
ever, this serious intent and emo-
tional., effect are lightened by
humanistic. humor :
Fret not, daughter, if perchance
You attract a wanton glance ...
Lovely woman still may be
Careless with felicity.

-Daily-John Pollock
REHEARSING FOR TOMORROW night's premiere of "Galileo"
are Stephan Wyman as Galileo, Kathleen Thompson as Virginia,
his daughter, and John Knox as Ludvigo, Virginia's fiance. The

continue to be offered to the Sen- administrators and the 65 men
ate. Emergency meetings will con- will become speeches without op-
tinue to be available as at pres- portunity for interchange. If this1
ent. function is delegated to the new!
Also, those opposed to reorga- nine-man Senate Advisory Com-
nization say the Senate is pres- mittee, there will be a loss both in
ently too large for satisfactory the number who are first-hand
discussion, yet the proposals leave participants and in time since
the size of the group the same and ideas must first go to the Assem-
do not change its responsibili- bly and then to the Senate.
ties. Nothing within the proposals
is likely to change habits of at- b
tendance, the dissenters added. Oglesby, W el
The five objectors say the pro-
posed 65-man Assembly will per- ; Breht e nlie n
form much the same function now - ee 1 IVeJ
entrusted to SACUA. In fact, they
add, the proposed new bylaws re- Summer Bill
lating to the Assembly borrow
the two paragraphs relating to By JOYCE WINSLOW
authority and duties which now TeUiest lyrasu
appear in the bylaws constituting The University Players, a stu-
SACUA. dent theatrical group has an-1
They also said the present 19- nounced its seven-show Playbill
man group constituting SACUA for the spring-summer semester.
has never included a representa- ' The first play they will present is
tive from each school and college. Carl Oglesby's "The Hero" May 28
It is thus more likely to stimulate and 29. 8:00 p.m. at Trueblood
university-wide attitudes rather Auditorium. This will be the third
than those of particular units. in a 1961 major Hopwood drama
The objectors see a possible risk award winning series of plays by
under the new system that with Oglesby.
each school and college represent- On June 11 and 12, 8:00 p.m. at
ed in the Assembly, conscientious ' Lydia Mendelsohn Theatre, the
Assemblymen will feel an dbliga- Players will present "Triple
tion to speak for their units. The Threat." an evening of one-act
impact of the views of SACUA plays. The titles of these plays
as presently constituted depends have not yet been announced.
z on the stature and thoughtfulness Tickets for these plays are cur-
of the individuals involved rather rently available by mail order
than upon their position as repre- from the 'U' Players, in care of
sentatives of a larger group, such the Department of Speech, Ann
as would be the case in the 65- Arbor at $1.00 for the Oglesby
man Assembly. play and $.50 for "Triple Threat."
Another objection to reorgani- Also announced by the Players
--- is their Summer Playbill. "The
+ Threepenny Opera" by Bertolt
Retired Prof essor lBrecht and Kurt Weill will be
* . I, Tj . staged June 30 through July 3 in
Diesin . UVHospital lLydia Mendelssohn.
r T. S. Eliot's "The Confidential
Dr. Emory Sink, assistant pro- Clerk." a comedy, will run from
fessor of hygiene and public July 14-17.
health and part-time opthalmol- Two imaginative short plays will
ogist in the University's Health be seen July 21-24. They are "The
Service until his retirement in Private Ear" and "The Public
1957. died yesterday in University Eye," written by Peter Shaffer,
Hospital. author of "The Five Finger Exer-
Sink graduated from the Uni-- cise."
versity in 1911, received his Mas-( Shakespeare's "Measure For
ter of Science degree in 1915 and f Measure," a comedy exploring the
the degree of Doctor of Medicine workings of justice, will be staged
in 1930, all from the University. August 4-7.

The rumor that local landlords
had pressured the administration
into raising rents at University
Terrace has been going around
for over a dozen years and has
never been substantiated by fact,
Lawrence Phillips, Grad, member
of Graduate Student Council, said
yesterday.
According to the schedule of
rates at University Terrace apart-
ments, the past rent raise was in
1963 and consisted of an increase
of three dollars on one and two
bedroom apartments. This was the
first raise in rents since 1959.
Chester Malanosk, manager of
University apartment facilities,
said in an interview that he did
not anticipate any rent increase'
for next year.

ISA ANNOUNCES 1965-66 OFFICERS
Newly elected officers of International Students Association are,
from left to right, Choon C. Chen, '66G, president; David M.
Pitcher, '67E, executive vice-president, and Janet Marie Sutyak,
'68, administrative vice-president.

,t

I - -------- - ________________

I

eight hundred fuller

1 7

A

Proud New Address

University Players' performance
Trueblood Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Directing "Galileo" is Dr. Wil-
liam Halstead of the speech de-
partment. In attempting to at-
tain , the impact of a Brechtian'
"epic theatre" presentation, Hal-
stead is employing a great many
special theatrical devices in the
present production.
Few Actors'
The use of a few actors to play
several completely different roles
with little or no costume and
make-up changes, the use of
scenic projections, and the tech-
nique of having actors address the
audience directly are intended to
complement the didactic intent
and emotional effect of the play.
Further enhancing the overt +

of the Brecht play will be in
theatricality of the production is
the multi-level setting on the
semi-Elizabethan stage in the
Trueblood Auditorium. The stage
has been designed for the produc-
tion by Prof. Calvin Quayle of the
speech department. Also indicative
of the play's theatricality is the
fact that twenty-four actors are
portraying nearly seventy different
roles. Costumes for this cast have
been provided by Prof. Zelma
Weisfeld of the speech department
The text of the play is an adap-
tation by Charles Laughton who
collaborated with Brecht on the
first American production of the
play in 1947 when Laughton play-
ed the title role.

1:

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Lief, Davis, Wittkower To I

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7
8:20-a.m.-Harold I. Lief of Tu-
lane University will lecture on
"The Teaching of Sex Informa-
tion and Marital Counselling to
Medical Students and Residents in
Psychiatry" at Children's Hospital
Aud.
4 p.m.-George M. Davis of the
Museum of Zoology will speak on
"Systematics: An Integration of
Disciplines" in a Department of
Zoology Seminar at 1400 Chemis-
try Bldg.
4 p.m.-An organization meet-
ing of the Faculty-Student Com-
mittee to End the War in Viet
Nam, and a discussion of the na-
tionwide teach-in and the Wash-
ington March will be held in Aud.
A.
4:10 p.m.-Pudolph Wittkower
will speak on "Classic and Ro-
mantic: Architecture and the Gar-
den in Eighteenth Century Eng-
land" at Aud. B.
4:15 p.m.-U. T. Place, from the
University of Chicago, will speak
on "The Status of Mentalistic
Explanation in Psychology" in Rm.
2003, Angell Hall.
7:30 p.m.-The Economic Re-
search and Action Project of Stu-
dents for a Democratic Society will
sponsor a series of talks by wel-
fare mothers and community or-
ganizers working in Cleveland to
establish organizations of the
poor that will challenge the local
power structure and improve city
welfare services. The talks will be
held in the Multipurpose Rm. ofI
the UGLI.
8 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players will
present Bertolt Brecht's "Gali-
leo" in Trueblood Aud..
8 p.m.-Prof. William B. Bean ofj
ENDING TODAY
"HONEYMOON HOTEL"
STHURSDAY

the University.of Iowa will speak
on "Physicians and Books as Il-
lustrated by the Gold-Headed
.Canes," at the Fifth Level amphi-
theatre of the Medical Science
Bldg.
8:30 p.m.-Norman Brody, bass-
baritone, will give a recital in the
School of Music Recital Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a lecture demonstra-
tion on "Japanese Music: Nagauta
and Matsuri Bayashi" by William
P. Maim of the University Japa-
nese Study Group in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
2:15 p.m.-Alex Bernstein of Si-
mulmantics Corp. will speak on
"Artificial Intelligence" in Room
1057 of the Mental Health Re-
search Institute.
3 p.m.-A Research Seminarin
Hospital and Medical Care Sys-
tems will discuss "Organizations
of Medical Care and Its Effect on
Hospital Use" in Rm. 69 of the
Business Administration Bldg.
3 p.m.-Prof. Herbert Goldstein,
of the department of special edu-

Give Lectures
4 p.m.-Prof. Guy E. Swanson
will speak on "Human Nature
and the Search for a Naturalistic
Ethic" in a Charles Horton Cooley
Centennial lecture, at Aud. A.
4 p.m.-Julius London of the
University ,ofColorado will speak
on "Time Variations of Ozones in
the Upper Atmosphere" in Rm.
5500 East Engineering.

EXCITINGLY MODERN, EIGHT HUNDRED FULLER is thoughtfully planned to offer all the
conveniences of contemporary apartment living in a relaxed suburban atmosphere, together
with the cultural advantages of a University City. Poised gracefully above the Huron River,
Eight HundredFuller is within walking distance of the campus of the University of Michigan
and only minutes away from St. Joseph, University and Veterans Hospitals.
FOR INFORMATION
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED APARTMENTS CALL
AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER ONLY 663-6549
AT R EDUCED RATES.
SORRY: ALL FULL FOR THE FALL MRS. GIBSON,
RESIDENT MANAGER

k!

1
i
1
.
:

4:15 p.m.-George Howerton of
Northwestern University will lec-
ture on ''Today's Demands for
Musical Excellence" in a Pi Kappa
Lambda honors assembly in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Michelangelo Antonioni's
"Il Grido (The Outcry) " in the
Architecture Aud.
7 p.m.-Prof. Herbert Goldstein,
of the department of special edu-
ction at Yeshiva University will
deliver the Special Education Col-
ioquium lecture on "Special Class
vs. Regular Class Placement for3
the Educable Mentally Retarded,"'
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
8 p.m.-The Department of

r U of M FOLK
FESTIVAL
Friday--Saturday-Sunday, April 9-10-11
Blues, Bluegrass and Traditional
Concerts, Hootenannies and Workshops
Featuring:
MIKE BLOOMFIELD-"The ,best of the growing
ranks of 'fay' bluesmen."-SING OUT, March, '64.
STU RAMSEY-"You're going to be excited by
anything Stu Ramsey plays."-CHAD MITCHELL
RAY TATE-"Tate, dean of the Chicago 'Old Town'
School of Folk music, presents a lively picture of
the richness and depth of country music."
-HOOTENANNY MAGAZINE, March, 1964.
DANNY KALB-"Kalb is one of the most versatile
musicians I know."-DAVE VAN RONK. "A
brilliant guitarist."-SING OUT, July, 1964.
TICKETS & PROGRAM INFO AVAILABLE NOW at:
Disc Shop, Discount Records, Herb David,
and The Union Desk. Also at the Door.

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
Department of Speech

Bertolt Brecht's
GALILEO

Tonight thru Saturday
8:00 P.M.
Trueblood Auditorium

4
/ '

Box Office Open Daily 12:30-8:00

r

cation at Yeshiva University will univeity Players will
deliver the Special Education Col- present Bertolt Brecht's "Gali-
loquium on "General Problems in leo in Trueblood Aud.
the Preparation of Teachers of 8 p.m.-A travel film will be
Exceptional Children" in the Uni- presented in Aud. A.

COMING!

Spring-Summer Season

verhtv Hig.h Rehool cafeteria.
3:30 p.m.-The Michigan Junior
College Association Conference
will be at the Michigan Union.
4 p.m.-Punya Shoka Ray of
the University of Chicago will
speak on "Language Standardiza-
tion" in Lane Hall series lecture in
Rm. 200, Lane Hall.

8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
Concerto Concert will be held, pre-
senting the University Symphony
Orchestra with Student Auditions
Winners, at Hill Aud.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

On

I

'
DIAL 8-6416
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME !"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
-New York Times
'A1
Flom
Danu h

,I

NOW
s CUI.

DIAL
5-6290

fhat story about marriage
on-the-rocksl ad a

Friday & Saturday, May 28-29:
Carl Oglesby's THE HERO
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM ALL SEATS $1.00
Friday & Saturday, June 11-12:
g a AN EVENING OF
TRIPLE THREATTEEENIGO
T H REE ONE ACTS
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE ALL SEATS 50c
MAIL ORDERS NOW ACCEPTED. ORDER FORMS ALSO
AVAILABLE AT TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM POX OFFICE
AND ANNOUNCING!
PLAYBILL SUMMER '65
In the Air-Conditioned Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
June 30-July 3: Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's
THE THREEPENNY OPERA
July 14-17: T. S. Eliot's
THE CONFIDENTIAL CLERK
July 21-24: Peter Shaffer's
THE PUBLIC EAR and THE PUBLIC EYE

t

that rocks.

the

screen

with
laughter!

I

I

R~cKGina
HUDSON-L!Gig
YOUNG
g p

August 4-7:

William Shakespeare's
MEASURE FOR MEASURE

(I

August 11-14: Opera Department, School of Music in
AN OPERA, to be announced
ALL PERFORMANCES 8:00 P.M., WED. THRU SAT.,

7.

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