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April 03, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-03

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"

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. 3 APRIL 1995

~AGI~ TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~ATT~rRnAY. 2 APTlY!. itIa~

Viii {,/lVL (i , U Al 1V1L &Ufjj

a

ATTEMPTING TO LOWER COSTS:

Controversy Over Book Prices Still Rages

(Continued from Page 1)
up and placed the next morning
and identified by slips of paper
with the sellers' name on them.
Because of this lackadaisical
approach, many students' books
were lost or not accredited to
them, much hard feeling was cre-
ated, and many customers were
lost. Indeed, one irate student
once threatened to sue the book-
store in excess of $38 for lost
books.
The store eventually failed be-
cause of lack of student support,
despite the fact that the store
offered its customers clear-cut
savings over the comercial book-
stores. One of the other major
problems involved, however, was
the problem of getting students to
work in the store. Good managers
who were willing to work for $100
a season were hard to come by,
and low wages were also a factor
in discouraging students from ap-
plying to work in support of the
store.
No New Texts
In addition, many who worked
with the store pointed to the in-
ability to sell new texts as a ma-
jor cause of failure. Had the ex-
change been allowed to carry new
textbooks, they claimed, many
students would have been drawn
to patronize the store in that
they would not have been forced
to split up their buying and sell-
ing tasks to two different loca-
tions.
Across
Campus
The University's Students Union
will sponsor the second day of
its two-day conference for all Af-
rican students in Michigan. A
morning business meeting will be
followed by the African Students
annual banquet and ball at the
American Legion Club, 1035 S.
Main St.
The banquet, featuring African
food, will begin at 6 p.m., the ball
at 9:30 p.m. Speaking at the ban-
quet will be John Malecela, am-
bassador from Tanzanti. He will
speak on "Africa and World Af-
fairs."
Tickets for the banquet and
ball can be purchased at the In-
ternational Center.
SATURDAY, APRIL 3
4:10 and 7 p.m.-Prof. Robert
Clark of the Music School will
give an organ recital in rm. 2110
of the Music School, North Cam-
pus.
On the program will be "Varia-
tions on 'Est-Ce Mars'" by Swee-
linck, "Choral Preludes from the
Orgelbuchlein" by Bach; and
"'Sonata on the Ninety-Fourth
Psalm" by Reubke.
7 p.m.-Prof. Claude Eggertsen
of the education school will ad-
dress the spring banquet of the
Indian Students Association in the
Union.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Buster Keaton in
"The General" in Architecture
Aud.
8:30 p.m. - The Choral Union
Series will present the National
Ballet of Canada in Hill Aud.
SUNDAY, APRIL 4
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Buster Keaton in
"The General" in Architecture
Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Mr. and Mrs. John
Baum and Mr. and Mrs. John
Feldkamp will speak on "The
Formation of a Christian Home"
at the Gabriel Richard Center,
331 Thompson St.

Whereas the area commercial
bookstores buy students books for
no more than 50 per cent of list
price, and often considerably less,
dependent upon their condition,
they have tacitly agreed among
themselves to sell them back to
buyers for no less than 75 per cent
regardless of condition, and often
for considerably more. The SBX,
in this respect, offered to its pa-
trons a definite, tangible savings.
Those wishing to sell their used
texts brought them into the SBX
and named their price. To this
the SBX added 10 per cent to
cover costs, and then put the
books on their shelves. Thus sell-
ers got more for their books, and
buyers generally paid less.
' The Student Government Coun-
cil ran the exchange from 1959
to 1963 in the basement of the
Student Activities Building. Here,
from the spring of '59 . to the
spring of '62, the exchange lost
money only twice, in the fall of
'60 and the fall of '61. Even so,
the store had its difficulties, and
in the fall of '63 the operation
was turned over to the National
Student Association.
Same Problems
SGC ran into much the same
problems as the Union had. Stu-
dent employes were hard to come
by, and so were student customers.
One aspect of the operation which
discouraged the patronage of these
stores was the fact that when the
student sold his books, he had to
wait for his payment until the

books were sold, and this was of- tion, stores of a similar nature in Next fall SGC plans to reopen
ten a semester's or a year's wait. Chicago and at other campuses the SBX attempt. There has been
Indeed, one year's books showed around the country. The whole talk of an expensive renovation of
normal sales yielding a profit of attempt went under, largely due the Union swimming pool, though
$260, while forfeited books yielded to the same reasons it failed at talk of this sort has been up for
$207. the University-because of an un- discussion for quite a long time.
Yet the chief complaints of derestimation of the size of the One of the more solid prospects
management centered around the task, at hand. The professional centers around the new Centicor
unfavorable location of the store, bookman hired at the University Poetry, whose owner has offered
and the fact that students were was a professional but, apparently it as a possible site of next year's
far more willing to trade in their not professional enough to keep SBX, on a rent-free basis.
books for cash at the same place the complex organization grow- Yet the SBX will probably face
they could buy their new books ing. Costly errors were made in the same problems next year that
for the next term. Another prob- ordering texts, and the Coop had it has in the past. In the words of
lem stemmed from the fact that trouble acquiring lists of the nec- a report submitted by a past
the exchange was unable to pro- essary texts. In addition, there SBX mnnager, "for the SBX to
vide students advance information was not nearly enough capital on succeed, we will require strong
concerning what books would be hand to supply the short-term backing from parent organization
used in course work for the next needs of the store. The Ann Arbor in difficulties with superior pow-
semester. merchants expect to sink about ers-powers which frustrate at-
The Ann Arbor bookstores get $50,000 into supplying their stores tempts to complete book lists, in-
advance information on what with the books needed at the be- hibit relocation of SBX opera-
books will be used for courses ginning of each term. The NSA's tions, complicate dorm advertise-
through the large-scale and rather capital was around $5,000, and ment, and explicitly prohibit sell-
expensive operation called the thus there were delays of two to ing of new merchandise in the
Textbook Reporting Service, three weeks in getting books-a exchange."
whereby a long-term and con- wait which really couldn't be ex- The trend within SGC at pres-
certed effort is made to get book pected of students who could walk ent not only to push for extra
information from professors. The downstairs and get their books at support of next year's SBX, but
SBX was unable to apply such a Follett's or Wahr's well in time for also to press for a reversal of the
successful effort to complete their classes. Regents' policy forbidding the sale
book lists. E nof new texts. Yet, whether the
Take Over Everything Wrong push is successful or not, the ques-
In the spring of 1963, the Na- The Coop had the wrong books,I tion of getting competent emplo-

Give Funds
For German
Study at 'U',
The German department has
recently been awarded four 3-
year $6600 graduate fellowships}
under the National Defense Edu-
cation Act.
"The government ignored the
more well-known languages and
favored the less common ones in
terms of financial aid until this
year," said Clarence K. Pott,
chairman of the German depart-
ment.
Pott also speculated that com-
plaints from the University con-
cerning this oversight may have
been instrumental in determining
whether the German department
would receive grants this year.
The German department feels
that the fellowships should be
awarded to outstanding beginning
students or at early stages in
their graduate career.
Sherman Rosen, Grad, Manfred
Kremkus, '65, Robert Wagner a
graduate of Connecticut Wesleyan
College and Joan Martin, a grad-
uate of Hunter College, received
the awards this year.

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BUSTER KEATON
I1
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Th THE GENERALi
The master of dry comedy takes his turn at a Civil War film.
I James Agee reporting on Keaton's performance has said, "Kea- ;
/
f ton's face ranked almost with Lincoln's as an early American
.U
* archety e; it was haunting, handsome, almost beautiful, yet it
f was irreducibly funny . . . no other comedian could do as much *
* with the deadpan."
f I
Filmed with a Chaplin-like technique emphasizing a minimum u
Ue
of detail and a maximum of effect, THE GENERAL is a Keaton "
I I
* masterpiece.
1 f
1 f
*f
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
af
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. f
aI
f 1
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUOITORIUM a
af
* ADMISSION: PTY CENTS f
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WIN
A,

4

"A

tional Student Association took
over the SBX operation. Because
the NSA was outside the Univer-
sity, it was allowed to handle new
books. NSA opened up a textbook
store in Nickel's Arcade.
This operation failed within a
year. NSA had opened, in addi-

the wrong set-up. Yet it did offer yes to work in the store and get-
lower prices, plus a 10 per cent ting students to give support, de-
rebate at the end of the season. pends upon what strenuous ad-
The initial student support, how- I vertising campaigns and even
ever, was not enough to support widely located dormitory pickup
such a big undertaking, and the stations could not do - entice
project failed with a loss of money j enough students to contribute
involved. 'their books to the SBX operation.

eight hundred fuller

M

A

Proud New Address

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

II

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPLWUIT'iTl.N form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satuiday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
African Students Union, Conference
of African students in the state of
Michigan, banquet, 6 p.m., American
Legion, 1035 S. Main St. His Excellency
the Ambassador of Tanzania will speak
on "Africa in World Affairs"; ball
from 9:30 p.m. until 1 a.m.
* * *
Newman Student Association, "The
Formation of a Christian Home," Mr.
and Mrs. John Baum and Mr. and
Mrs. John Fedkamp, April 4, 7:30 p.m.
331 Thompson.
** *
Presbyterian Campus Center, Sun.,
April 4. "Contemporary East Africa,"
leader, A B. Daniel, first counselor
from Tanzania to the U.S.A., Curtis
Room, 7 p.m., 1432 Washtenaw.
* * *
Voice Political Party, Executive Com-
mittee meeting to discuss programming
and policy, Sat., April 3, 10 a.m., Voice
Office, 2534 SAB.
* * *
Voice Political Party, Membership
meeting, Mon., April 5, 7:30 p.m., Un-
ion, Room 3-S.
* * *
Alpha Phi Omega, Executive Board
meeting, April 4, 2 p.m.. Room 3545
SAB.
DIAL 5-6290
HELD OVER 4th WEEK
Uhru Tues., April 6th)
CONTINUOUS I POPULAR
PERFORMANCES I PRICES!
STANLEY KRAMER "IT'S A
MAD,
UIJRA MAD, MAD,
PANAVISIOr MAD
TECHNICOLOR* WORLD"
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Shows at
1:00- 3:40 -6:25 - 9:10
DIAL 662-6264

SATURDAY, APRIL 3
Day Calendar
Michigan Association of School Li-
brarians Conference-Michigan Union,
8 a.m.

School of Music Degree Recital-Ellen
Sullivan, pianist: Recital Hall, School
of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Howard
Linn Schreyer, Engineering Mechanics;
thesis: "On the Theory of Elastic In-
stability," today, 220 W. Engrg. Bldg.,
10 a.m. Co-Chairmen E. F. Masur and
I. K. McIvor.

Hall, Geology; thesis: "Paleoecology and
Taxonomy of Fossil Ostracoda in the
Vicinity of Sapelo Island, Ga.," today,
2045 Natural Science Bldg., 8 a.m.
Chairman R. V. Kesling.
Informal Electrochemistry Seminar:
Prof. Royce W. Murray, University of
North Carolina, will speak on "Adsorp-
tion Phenomena in Electrochemistry,"
today, 11 a.m. in Room 1200 Chemistry

School of Music Recital - Robert

Clark, organist; Organ Studio 2110,
School of Music, 4:30 and 7 p.m. Doctoral Examination for Donald
- -- -

D. (Continued on Page 3)

-4

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS- 1965-1966

L

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, JEAN MARTINON, Conductor . .Sat.,Oct. 9
JOHN BROWNING, Piano soloist
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist. ............... ................Fri., Oct. 15
CZECH PHILHARMONIC, KAREL ANCERL, Conductor .............Fri., Oct. 29
POZNAN CHOIR, from Poland .............................Tues., Nov. 2
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORECHESTRA ...................Mon., Nov. 15
with MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Cello soloist
"BARBER OF SEVILLE" (Rossini) NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO. . . .Sun., Nov. 21
GRAND BALLET CLASSIQUE DE FRANCE ..................... Tues., Nov. 23
PHYLLIS CURTIN, Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Co. .......Thurs., Jan. 20
MONTE CARLO NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, LOUIS FREMAUX, Cond. .Sat., Feb. 26
MICHEL BLOCK, Piano soloist
NATIONAL BALLET, from Washington, D.C..............(2:30) Sun., Mar. 27

SLLtut
DIAL 8-6416
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME!"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
--New York Times
h
' tmo- .,
{{,
MAN .

SEASON TICKETS:
SINGLE CONCERTS:

$25.00-$20.00-$17.00-$14.00-$12.00
$5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.50-$1.50

EXTRA SERIES

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA, GEORGE SZELL, Conductor ...........Wed., Oct.
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA,................ .....Tues., Nov.
.... with IGOR OISTRAKH, Violin soloist
"PAGLIACCI" and "CAVALLERIA RUSTIANA," ..........(2:30) Sun., Nov.
NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO.
RUMANIAN FOLK BALLET ................................. Wed.' Feb.
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist .................................. Mon., Mar.

20
16
21
16
7

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I

SEASON TICKETS: $12.50-$10.00-$8.50-$7.00-$6.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: $5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.50-$1.50
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES

I

I

ENDING TODAY
"HUSH ... HUSH
SWEET CHARLOTTE"
At 1:00-3:35-6:15 & 9:00
0 SUNDAY 0
SEE Noui m
No "I

NETHERLAND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA, .................... .
... .SZYMON GOLDBERG, Conductor and Violinist
RAFAEL PUYANA, Harpsichordist ...........................
NEW YORK PRO MUSICA, NOAH GREENBERG, Conductor ......
HERMANN PREY, Baritone, in a Lieder Recital ... ........... .
VIENNA OCTET .........................................
I SOLISTI VENETI............ ................... . .
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY, THOR JOHNSON, Conductor

Mon., Oct.
Sun., Oct.
Fri., Nov.
Wed., Feb.
Tues., Mar.
Wed., Mar.
Thurs., Mar

31
12
2
1
16
31

1 .

SEASON TICKETS: $18.00-$15.00-$12.00

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