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March 30, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-30

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x

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, 30 MARCH 1965

Y Negro's Lot COMMUNICATION SCIENCE:

+t,,...

THE STUDENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE for the residential colle
fine .points in the proposed student-faculty government for the resi
curriculum planning, council representation and general legislativea
mittee will present Its results to the Residential College Faculty Com
dore Newcomb, lower left, chaired the meeting.
Joit Government]

In America
Explored
(Continued from Page 1)
trying to be admitted into Little
Rock.
Technically, the production will
be a version of the readers' thea-
tre, according to McGraw. One
hundred parts will be portrayed
by six actors, giving a lack of
immediacy. "It's a statement, not
a play," McGraw said. The author:
wants his audience "to think
throughout, and not to become
too emotionally involved; he does
not ask his audience to suspend
disbelief by keeping a lecture at-
mosphere."
"Although the play is not dra-
na inkthe conventional sense, for
' it lacks a single cohesive plot,"
it is important for American thea-
tre, McGraw said. It is not Amer-
ge met yesterday to discuss some tca's first documentary composi-
dential college. After ideas about Lion, but it's timeliness is evi-
policies are clarified, the com- dent and important.
imittee for approval. Prof. Theo- In discussing whether a play
written with a minimum of narra-
tion, predominantly drawing on
" extracts from historical docu-
ments, could be called a work ofI
Detailed rt, the panel differed.K
said that in reading the play it
wassuperficial; the reader hasI
Tom Smithson, '65. said. to inject his own experience into
"Representation by housing unit it. Etasheff commented that works
might possibly be better because ; f art aren't necessarily true, to
freshmen might tend to get them- : tratal nediaranyMtraw
selves more involved than seniors, traditional media and McGrawo
and in this type of representation of art only when it's staged.
those who are more interested Theteffeytivenss o n White
would have a chance to be on the America"t as a didactic statement
council," committtee m e m b e r iwas also discussed. Written in
Kenneth Whinter, '66, said. wsas dsusdiWitni
On April 12 the committee 1963, the play was created for a
pans Aoronlude2thediscusmwidening audience, an awakening
plans to conclude its discussion of American conscience, Krystall
community government and pre- said. As a stimulus to under-
sent the final proposds to the standing, it provides the historical
faculty comnttee for the resi- basis for the present Negro re-
dential college. volt.
Critics have often spoken of the
" emotional impact of "In White
Adm sstotts America." However, McGraw said
that he did not believe the play's
message would be "old hat in Ann
Arbor." "I think they will be sur-
prised at what history says, and

By BARBARA SEYFREID t
The University's communication
sciences department does n o t,
teach anything about drama, tele-
vision, journalism or any of the
other communication arts. But it
can introduce the theoretical con-1
cepts of computers which can re-
produce themselves, machines that
can speak on heart disease.
"Communication sciences i s
concerned with natural systems,
such as the brain, and artificial
systems, such as a computer.
Technical studies center on the
informational aspects of these
systems and the relationships be-
tween them," Prof. Arthur Burks;
of the philosophy and communica-j
tion sciences departments says.I
Founding
T h e communication sciences,
program wasafounded in 1957
when Burks and Prof. Gordon
Peterson, director of the com-
munication sciences laboratory,
had three graduate students who
did not fit into any existing grad-
uate program.
On this basis they formed the

concentrating in the departmental
program.
Burks describes the long range
goals of the department as the de-
velopment of two theories: a
theory of computers which would
explain how both natural and ar-
tificial computers operate and a
theory of language which would
explain how both natural and ar-
tificial systems communicate.
Self-Reproduction
One form of research in which3
Burks is currently engaged deals
with the theory of self-reproduc-
ing automata. This work was
started by John von Neumann.
"Abstractly compared to the}

wanted to do was to take the com-
puter's powers of logic and mem-
ory and add simulated sensory'
and muscle organs. He wanted to
develop a model of self-reproduc-
tion that would show how the in-
formational aspects of reproduc-
tion are handled."
According to Burks a machine
which can reproduce itself is nowj
logically feasible, but neither:
technically possible nor econom-
ically practical. "What good is
such a machine?" he asks.
Its logical design, however, does
aid in understanding what infor-'
mation has to be transferred from

The primary problem with self-
reproduction is that logically, re-
production in building requires a
device at least as complicated as
the one being built, if not more
complex, since it has to do the
building, Burks explains.
"Von Neumann solved this prob-
lem," he says, "by hypothesizing a
tape which would contain the pat-
tern of the construction. The first
computer would simply make a
copy of this tape and install it in
the second one."
This is similar to providing the
machine with a genetic basis.
Burks explains that von Neu-
mann found that with six kinds

f
}

human being, a computer has the the parent organism to the organ- of elements reproduction of an
power to make logical decisions," ism being reproduced in order for
Burks says. "What von Neumann self-reproduction to take place. See STUDY, Page 8
BEGINNING TODAY-CONTINUING
TOMOR ROW AN D T H URSDAY ..
3 University Lectures on "THE 'MYSTERY' OF THE QURAN (KORAN"

k

ResearcI Probes Information Systems

By LESLEY FINKELMAN
The Student Advisory Commit-
tee for the residential college yes-
terday discussed more details
concerning the proposed commun-
ity government within the college.
The proposed student - faculty
government would have broad
legislative powers. In the commit-
tee's last two meetings study of
the composition and functions of
the government centered around
curriculum planning, representa-
tion on the college council and the
council's legislative powers within
the college.
The possibility of curriculum
planning by both students and
faculty was supported by several
members.
Student Participation
"It's important that students
have a: part in planning their
curriculum," committee member
Karen. Kenah, '66, said. It was
pointed out that one reason for
students to -take part in course
planning is that the residential
college is allegedly experimental
in many radical respects and stu-
dent participation in deciding1
curriculum would be another chal-
lenging educational innovation.
It was decided that the college
council,: which would have author-

ity to set and change all policies
and regulations within the college,
should consist' of either 18 or 241
members, the number divided
equally between students and
faculty.
Concerning representation on1
the council, committee members
raised the question of electing
members on a housing unit or
class standing basis.J
Class Elections
"I'd like to see the idea of grad-
uating-class consciousness develop;
from a system of apportioned
class election," committee member
Out-of-State
Requirement
(Continued from Page 1)
only out-state applicants partici-
pate, would be reviewed. At the
present time, those out-state ap-
plicants who indicate they will
definitely attend the University if
accepted are given preference over
those who do not make such a
commitment.
This year. he said, giving pref-
erence to applicants under Early
Decision has given the admissions

program which was departmental- I
ized in November, 1964. At pres-
ent there are 65 graduate students
DIAL 5-6290
3RD

By DR. KENNETH CRAGG,
D.Phil., M.A.
-leading Christian student of Islam; an
Anglican clergyman; former Editor of
the Muslim World Quarterly; Professor
of Philosophy at the American Univer-
sity of Beirut; Professor of Arabic and
Islamics; Author; presently Warden of
St. Augustine's College, Canterbury,
Kent, England.

TUES.: Its Original Context
WED.: Its Ruling Themes
THURS.: Its Contemporary
Relevance
4:10 p.m.--Multipurpose Rowt
UGLI
Sponsored by The University of
Michigan, Office of Religious Affairs

I,

~

I11

TONIGHT & TOMORROW

Professional Theatre
Program
and
Creative Arts Festival
present

office less leeway than they would
like in admitting the students.
Groesbeck indicated it is, too earlyI
yet to say whether Early Decision
applicants will be given any pref-
erence at all, but he said he could
say they will be given less pref-
erence than previously.
Groesbeck also said that thej
quota for out-of-state applicants
has remained the same over the
past three years, being frozen at
from 1100 to 1200 'freshmen ac-
cepted to all University schools.He
said that no quotas have been
set for the 1966 sessions, but saidt
that; each year it becomes more
difficult for an out-state applicant
to enter the University of a fresh-
man.
\ \1
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME !"
---Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
-New York Times
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEACI
JEAN SERVALS
I Filmed in EASTMANCOLOR

that it says it so well;" he com- Prices This Attraction Only
mented. Matinees $1.25
Educated in South Africa Eves. & Sun. $1.50
through the undergraduate level
Krystall said that what struck him Shows at
was that such a commentary has 1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25 - 9:10
had to be written.
Shown at 1 :00
DIAL 3:35-6:15 and 9:00
662-6264 Feature Starts
25 Minutes Later
BR&FMV/!OfIM/AeIIAIIL4Bj
JOSEPH (077Ff NOMINATED FOR
!W U7 ACADEMY AWARDS
____ C SWEET
IIARLOJTE

I

i' the
qugan/)

A BRIlLIANT STUDY OF THE NEGRO STRUGGLE
FOR FREEDOM IN AMERICA.

Off Broadway's
Long Running Hit !

"THE PAIN,
THE HUMOR,
THE ANGER,
THE PRIDE"
-Time Mag.

"PASSIONATELY ALIVE .. ."-Life Mag.
"BEAUTY, POWER, DEEP EMOTION .. ."-Her. Trib.
"PROVOCATIVE.. . N.Y. Times
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE MARCH 30, 31

I

kl

S Wed.,March 31 through Sat., April 3 at 8 P.M.
Saturday Matinee at 2 P.M.
Tickets on sale at the Lydia Mendelssohn box office
Friday and Saturday Evenings Sold Out
University Players
Dept. of Speech present
GALILEO
by Bertolt Brecht
(Adantation by Charles Lauahton)

DISCOUNT RECORDS INC.
OPERA SALE

THIS WEEK
ONLY

OFF

Catalog
List Price

i 1'1 r% r" t'1 L ff t e1 t t M % t A {"T e- h P" t./ 1^^ /"' 1 M'1 t P'T " /"1 t'1 t t l /^ t f t t ~" 1't' f" !

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