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January 07, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-07

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Y, 7 JANUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y, 1 JANUARY 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

icoPresents
C ollege Tax Bill
WASHINGTON (R)-Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff (D-Conn), re-
introduced yesterday his bill to give parents a tax break on costs of
college education for their children.
The bill would allow parents to subtract from their taxes up to
$325 of such costs per student annually.
The proposal is identical with one Ribicoff offered last year as an
amendment to the $11.5 billion tax cut bill. The amendment was
" beaten 48-45 in the face of heavy

ACROSS PANAMA:
The Atom May Dig New Cana

. Senate Sets
Agreement
SOnFli*buster
" WASHINGTON (Ao) -i The Sen-
ate's annual row over anti-filibus-
ter moves reached the brink of
erupting yesterday but a "gen-
tleman's agreement" apparently
put- off the battle until at least
next week, possibly even later this
month.
Sen. Clinton P. Anderson (D-
NM), leader of a bipartisan group
seeking to change the rules so
filibusters can be shut off easier,
said the scrap probably will be
held in check until the new Con-
gress completes its organizing.
And that's all right with him,
he said, "we've got plenty of work
to do. I'm not going to worry
about it." Senate committees must
be set up and other organization-
al .steps remain before the Senate
will be ready to buckle down.
" i Morning Hour
However, Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont) told report-
ers he expects some preliminary
debate on the question to come
' up today during the period called
"the morning hour." That's the
time set' aside for introducing bills,
getting approval of non-controver-
sial matters and making three-
minute speeches.
After that period, any senator
could move to take up either of
the two resolutions inortduced yes-
" terday to limit filibusters. And
that would open up debate on
the whole issue-possibly kicking
off a ° lengthy discussion about
whether even to take up the reso-
lutions.
It had been expected that the
Senate would recess from day to
day instead of adjourning to avoid
the anti-filibuster proposals com-
ing up automatically with the
$ start of a new legislative day. But
Mansfield, who favors making it
easier to limit filibusters, adjourn-
ed the Senate last night instead
of recessing,
Tw Resolutions
The battle-lines for the anti-
filibuster fight were laid with the,
introduction of two resolutions:
One by Anderson would amend
the rules to permit debate to be
cut off by three-fifths of the sen-
ators present and voting, instead
of the two-thirds majority now
% required.
Sen. Paul H.' Douglas (D-Ill)
and others offered another reso-
4 lution to change the rules so de-
bate could be limited by a ma-
jority of the entire membership-
* that is, at least 51 of the 100
senators.
Forced Delay
" Unanimous consent was asked
for immediate consideration of
each resolution as it was intro-
duced. But in each case, Senate
Republican leader Everett M.
Dirksen of Illinois objected, forc-
ing a delay at least until today.
Later Anderson indicated to
newsmen that the whole matter
probably would not be brought up
until next week or later this
month.
He said "a gentleman's agree-
ment" has been reached that all
Senate rules except the anti-fili-
buster one will carry over from
the last Congress. He added that
no one's rights will be prejudiced
by delaying a showdown on the
debate limitation.

Johnson administration opposi-
tion. The treasury contended it
would cost $750 million annually
at first and $1.3 billion by 1970.
32 Co-Sponsors
Ribicoff said he believed the
proposal was picking up support,
however. He said it has 32 co-
sponsors this year compared with
13 when he first proposed it.
The 1965 sponsors include 17
Democrats and 16 Republicans
with both liberals and conserva-
tives in the group.
The proposal would permit an
income tax credit-which can be
subtracted from taxes due-on the
first $1,500 of tuition, fees, books
and supplies - room and board
would not be covered.
Sliding Percentile
The credit would be computed
this way: 75 per cent of the first
$200 of expenses, 25 per cent of
the next $300, and 10 per cent of
the next $1,000.
Ribicoff said there would be a
limitation on the credit so that it
would be reduced by 1 per cent of
the amount by which a taxpayer's
adjusted gross income exceeds
$25,000. This would mean the tax-
payer at the $57,500 level and
above would get no benefit.
He said his tax proposal was de-
signed to help the average family.
Impact Hurts
"These college costs hit middle
and lower middle income families
with an impact that hurts," he
said.
"I believe the time has come to
recognize that these average Amer-
icans are entitled to a break.
When they pay large sums to pro-
vide their children or themselves
with a college education, they are
spending money in the national
interest."
Ribicoff said the sliding scale
formula for the credit would make
it certain that students at public
colleges would get the largest
percentage relief while those at
private schools would get the big-
gest dollar relief.
In other action yesterday, Sen.
C Stuart Symington (D-Mo) propos-
ed a legal ban on foreign aid to
countries which permit the de-
struction of United States prop-
erties by rioters.
Offering ansamendment to the
foreign aid bill, Symington told
the Senate the American people
"are outraged by the apparently
approved, wanton destruction of
American embassies at the hands
of mobs and rioters in foreign
nations so generously assisted by
the United States."
Senate Republican Leader Ever-
ett M. Dirksen of Illinois planned
to renew the fight he lost last
year to nullify the Supreme
^ourt's legislative reapportionment
decision.
The court ruled last June, in
a 6-3 decision, that seats in both
branches of state legislatures must
be apportioned on a population
basis.
Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis)
proposed a change in the method
of appointing postmasters which
he said would take their selection
out of politics.
Postmasters now are nominated
by the President, subject to Sen-
ate confirmation, on the basis of
civil service examination of aplfii-
cants. The commission designates
up to three applicants for each
job as eligible for appointment.
One of these three may be nomi-
nated by the President.

By RICHARD F. NEWCOMB
AP Newsfeatures Writer
A new canal may be blasted
across the Isthmus of Panama by
atomic explosions.
Whether it comes about that
way, or through conventional en-
gineering methods, there will be
a new canal. President Lyndon
B. Johnson made that clear when
he announced that negotiations
will begin-perhaps this month-
for a new route. He specified four
possibilities:
1) The present route.
2) A second route in Panama,
200 miles east of the present canal.
3) A route through Colombia.
4) A route across Nicaragua,
possibly touching Costa Rica.
The response was gratifying-
all countries concerned want the
new canal. i
From the political standpoint,
the new canal opens a new era in
world relations. For one thing, it
means the end of the treaty under
which the present canal operates,
a treaty which has rankled Pan-
ama for 50 years. The president
of Panama called the agreement
"This accursed instrument."
Spectacle
Politics aside, a special treat is
in store for the sidewalk superin-
tendents who preside at all engi-
neering events. But before the
agreements, the studies, the prep-
arations are ready, they may have
another 10 years to wait.
The present canal is 50 miles
long, wide and deep in most of its
length. But the practical limit is
the size of the locks which lift
the ships 85 feet above sea level.

They are 110 feet wide, 40 feet
deep and 1000 feet long. No larger
ships-and there are already
hundreds-may cross the isthmus.
The new canal will be at sea
level. It will have no locks, could
easily be 1000 feet wide and 250
feet deep. Its necessity, and its
advantages, are apparent. It will
greatly increase the flow of ships,
increase the speed of transit, re-
duce the danger of atomic block-
age in wartime, and cut operation
costs.
If the present route is used,
atomic blasting is out. Too many
people live in the area.
Atomic blasting might be feasi-
ble for any of the other routes.
This is not science fiction; much
study has already been given to
Dems, Romney
To Meet Today
LANSING (M)-Democrats meet
today with Gov. George Romney,
ready to listen to his 1965 legisla-
tive proposals but equally ready to
caution that "cooperation is a
two-way street."
House speaker-designate Joseph
Kowalski (D-Detroit) said "it's
the governor's meeting-he'll pre-
pare the agenda" when he was
asked what the Democrats planned
to say at the meeting.
The governor has called for
bipartisan cooperation ever since
Nov. 3 when voters handed him
a second term and a dominantly
Democratic legislature.

just such a specific project by the
Lawrence Radiation Laboratory of
the University of California.
Take Route No. 2-a 60-mile
path across the isthmus in the
area of the Sarsadi and Morti
Rivers of Panama. Most of this is
thick jungle, dotted with Indian
villages, and with a thousand-foot
mountain range parallelling the
Atlantic shore. Prof. Gerald John-
son of the Lawrence Laboratory
told the Joint Congressional Com-
mittee on Atomic Energy a few
years ago that such a canal might
be dug for $500 million or less.
This compares with perhaps $3
billion for converting the present
canal.
Here's the method: T h r e e
hundred holes, about 800 feet
apart, would be drilled across the
isthmus The depth of the holes
would vary, from 600 feet at sea
level to perhaps 2500 feet in the
mountains Atomic charges would
be placed at the bottom of the
holes, which would then be filled.
Leaves Channel
On the proper day-no wind, to
control blowing of atomic debris-
the charges would be fired, fifteen
or so at a time, resulting in a
channel of uniform dimensions
across the isthmus. This, the
scientists say, can be achieved
with virtually no radioactive pol-
lution.
A new canal, built by any
method, will rank with any engi-
neering achievement of the 20th
Century. If the atomic method is
used, men will have opened a new
era in the control of his environ-
ment.

-Associated Press
LT. GERALD L. SEWELL OF HOUSTON, TEX. passes a Vietnamese child as he follows members
of the 3rd Vietnamese paratroop battalion in search of two Americans captured by Viet Cong
guerrillas in a hamlet near Binh Gia during nine-day battle in the area. This village was in Viet
Cong hands a few hours earlier.
FRUSTRATION, UNCERTAINTY:
SSenators View Viet Nam War

WASHINGTON (AP) - On the
threshhold of renewed congres-
sional debate over South Viet Nam,
many senators share a' sense of
frustration and uncertainty over
the course of the United States-
backed war on Communism in
Southeast Asia.
Eighty-three senators spoke out
in an Associated Press survey yes-
terday as Congress prepared for a
long, hard look at the situation in
South Viet Nam, beset by Com-
munist guerrillas and internal gov-
ernment woes. Only a scattering

advocated expansion of the war
into Communist North Viet Nam.
"The problem is tragically dif-
ficult," said Sen. Alan Bible (D-
Nev), "but I believe we must con-
tinue to do everything possible un-
der the present policy-increasing
the emphasis on a stable and re-
sponsible Vietnamese government
Bargaining Position
Thirty-one of the senators ready
to prescribe a course voiced gen-
erally similar views, many of them
suggesting negotiations 1 a t e r,

I

Wol d News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Congress made it official yesterday that Lyndon
B. Johnson and Hubert H. Humphrey have been duly elected President
and Vice-President of the United States.
The election anticlimax was carried out in a relaxed joint session
of the Senate and House to conduct the ritual of counting the Elec-
toral College votes and proclaiming the winners.
* * *
FORT WORTH, Tex.-The Congressionally-debated warplane
known as the TFX raced through a one-hour test flight yesterday,
successfully demonstrating its unique variable sweep wings.
The flight was the second for the supersonic F-111 but was his-
toric in that never before had an aircraft featuring the swept wings
performed satisfactorily.
WASHINGTON-President Lyndon B. Johnson's health message
to Congress today reportedly will propose an unprecedented $1-billion
to $1.5-billion program to improve health services to children. It
would be spread over 5 years.
LANSING-Hundreds of convicted criminals in Michigan could
win new trials under a new rule spelled out for the first time in a
Michigan Supreme Court opinion Tuesday.
The court, following guidelines laid down by the. United States
Supreme Court, threw out its own rule of allowing the same jury that
hears a case to rule on whether the defendant's confession was vol-
untary or not.
The unanimous opinion, written by Justice Michael O'Hara, said
the new rule applied not only to future cases, but to all past cases.
In the past, Michigan courts had allowed the jury to rule on
whether the confession was voluntarily or involuntarily given. In the
future, judges must make the determination in a pre-trial investi-
gation.
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when the anti-Communist forces
are in a better bargaining posi-
tion.
"It's a mistake to negotiate
when losing," said Sen. William
Proxmire (D-Wis).
"We should do what we are do-
ing," advised Sen. A. S. Mike Mon-
roney (D-Okla), "but do it even
better."
Based on Neutrality
Ten favored moving for nego-
tiations now, some suggesting
United Nations guidance toward
a settlement based on neutrality.
Only three lawmakers spoke out
flatly for expansion of the strug-
gle into North Viet Nam, al-
though five others mentioned com-
mitment of United States troops
or action against North Viet Nam
as possible steps toward an end to
the struggle.
Sen. George D. Aiken (R-Vt)
said the United States should not
take either step unless the nation
is ready to face an all, out war
that would include nuclear weap-
ons.
All Over Asia
"Expansion will not resolve the
problem," said Sen. Mike Mans-
field of Montana, the Democratic
leader. "It is more likely to en-
large it and in the end we may
find ourselves engaged all over
Asia in full scale war."
On the other hand, three sen-
ators called for withdrawal of
U.S. advisers and military aid
from the beleaguered Southeast
Asian nation.

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YOU CAN DO IT!
YOU CAN DO IT !
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9 YOU CAN work for the best
daily college newspaper in the
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* YOU CAN meet unusual and in-
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* YOU CAN gain valuable exper-
ience writing.
Stop in anytime this week
and come to the first trainee
meeting 7:30 Monday night,
Jan. 11, at 420 Maynard St.

JANU/AR Y

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r._-.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street Tel. 663-4129
ANNOUNCES

ENTIRE STOCK OF
FALL and WINTER
COATS

SILK SHIRTS

SABBATH SERVICES
Start Jan. 8, at 7:30 p.m. and every Friday
Saturdays, (with Beth Israel Cong.) at 9 a.m.
* * ** * *
CLASSES and STUDY GROUPS
at 7:30 p.m.
Monday-HEBREW, begin Jan. 11
Tuesday-VITAL JEWISH ISSUES,
begins Jan. 12 Dr. Emannuel Margolis, Inst.
Thursday-THE ESSENCE OF JUDAISM,
begins Jan. 14 Dr. Herman Jacobs, Inst.
Registration-Sunday, Jan. 10, 4 p.m.
Fee per course-Members $1.00; Non-Members $2.00
BET MIDRASH-conducted in Hebrew.
Co-sponsored by Jewish Theological Seminary' of
America, Detroit Midrasha and Hillel.
Thursday, starting Jan. 7
HEBREW LITERATURE, 4:15-6-Dr. Amos Tversky
-.% . .r - .- - t I, . i- I fI 4

ZWERDLING LECTURESHIP in BIBLICAL STUDIES
1965 Series, "The Hebrew Patriarchs
and History ' by
Pere R. deVaux, French archaeologist and
Biblical authority
Jan. 21, 4:15 p.m. Aud. C, Angell Hall
"ABRAM THE HEBREW" (Gen. 14,13).
Jan. 21, 8:15 p.m. Zwerdling-Cohn Hall,
1429 Hill St. (jointly with Beth Israel Cong.)
"BIBLICAL TRADITIONS and EXTERNAL
EVIDENCE"
Jan. 22, 4:15 p.m. Aud. C
"MY FATHER WAS A WANDERING
ARAMEAN" (Deut. 26, 5)

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11

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11

OTHER LECTURES--to follow

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