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March 27, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-27

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SATURDAY, 27 MARCH 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE THREE

SATUJWAY, Z7 MARCH 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THRVR

. . aaaava.,.
R

A

Berkeley's

Protests

Rage

for

Six Months

By MICHAEL BADAMO
The University of California
Berkeley campus over the past six
months has been the scene of a
series of protests, demonstrations,
riots and general student unrest.
The latest chapter in the Berke-
ley story was the threatened res-
ignation of University of Calif or-
nia President Clark Kerr and act-
Ing Chancellor Martin Meyerson
because of a dispute with the
Board of Regents concerning stu-
dent discipline in the recent foul
speech movement.
Problems in Berkeley began last
September with the announced
enforcement of long-standing and
long-ignored regulations barring
the use of university property for
off-campus causes or organiza-
A tions. This policy of enforcement
was immediately opposed by vari-
Dus student organizations includ-
tng Students for Goldwater,
Young Republicans, Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee
and Students -for Johnson, who
were determined to stand together.
Free Speech Movement
The groups banded together to
present a united front of student
organizations protesting the curbs
on political freedoms calling
themselves the Free Speech Move-
ment.
Michael Rossman, a member of
the FSM Steering Committee, said
"the Free Speech Movement is the
legitimate spokesman for the stu-
dents since it is most intimately
acquainted with the needs of the
students. It is only within the
ranks of the Free Speech Move-
ment that nearly all of the poli-
tical, religious and social action
groups on the campus are repre-
sented."
Disciplinary Action
In defiance of the rules, student
organizations set up tables at the
Bancroft-Telegraph entrance to
the campus as they had done in
past years. Political candidates
were advocated and funds were
collected. On September 30 eight
of the protesting students were

summoned before the dean of stu-
dents for disciplinary action. All
eight, including a 21 year old
junior transfer student from New
York named Mario Savio, were
suspended indefinitely from the
university.
The next day tables were set
up, this time in front of the ad-
ministration building, Sproul Hall,
and students voiced demands that
the suspensions be lifted. A for-
mer graduate student in mathe-
matics, Jack Weinberg, was de-
tained by university police for
trespassing and illegally soliciting
money. Weinberg was taken to a
waiting police car on the lawn of
Suroul Hall which was immedi-
ately surrounded by about 200
students and the number steadily
increased.
Mario Savio, now acknowledged
leader of the protest movement,
removed his shoes, mounted the
hemmed in police car and de-
manded that the administration
accede.
Refuses Demands
Savio and student leader,
Charles Powell, arranged a meet-
ing with Chancellor Strong to
discussthe issues. Strong refused
to accept any of the student de-
mands and reiterated the univer-
sity's policies on campus politi-
cal activity.
Savio then urged students to
force their way into Sproul Hall
and inhibit administrative opera-
tion.
Demonstrations c o n t I n u e d
throughout the night of October
1 and all the next day. Presi-
dent Kerr and Chancellor Strong
in a series of top-level meetings
submitted a compromise proposal
to the students. The agreement
stated that the arrested man,
Weinberg, would be booked but
that the university would not press
charges. It provided for a com-
mittee representing both students
and administrators to deal withj
the issues.
Continue Demonstrations
The remainder of the month of
October passed with only minor

demonstrations and many meet-
ings between students and ad-
ministrators. November saw the
reinstatement of the eight stu-
dents suspended in September.
Mario Savio and one other, how-
ever, were placed on probation.
Savio later dropped out of school
to work full-time for the cause.
The latter part of November
was spent in more frequent dem-
onstrations and student rallies
since negotiations had not pro-
duced results.
A delegation of five FSM rep-
resentatives requested a hearing
before the Regents. Although the
FSM delegation was admitted to
the Regents' meeting room, they
were not allowed to speak.
FSM Ultimatum
Further disciplinary action was
initiated against Savio and three
others for their participation in
the October demonstrations. The
FSM issued an ultimatum Decem-
ber 1 demanding that disciplinary
action against Savio and the oth-
ers be dropped, that present rules
concerning political speech be re-
vised and that the administration
refrain from further disciplinary
action against students or organi-
zations for political activity.
The administration ignored the

FSM's demands.
December 2 approximately 1000
students, faculty and non-univer-
sity persons packed four floors o4
Sproul Hall following a huge ral-
ly in the plaza between Sproul
Hall and the Student Union. They
remained in the building all night.
'Sleep-In'
Early in the morning Chancel-
lor Strong ordered the demonstra-
tors out of the building and warn-
ed of dire consequences if he
was not obeyed. The students re-
mained.
Outside the building approxi-
mately 635 uniformed police had
been assembling for nearly an
hour. They had come from the
Alameda County Sheriffs Depart-
ment, Oakland Police Department,
Berkeley Police Department, Uni-
versity Police Department and
the California Highway Patrol.
They were sent there by Califor-
nia Gov. Edmund G. Brown.
Police Arrests
For the next 12 hours police
worked zealously to clear the
building of protestors. All were ar-
rested and taken to public deten-
tion centers.
December continued with more
demonstrations and more admin-
istrative opposition, but the op-

position was becoming weaker.
The students clung to their de-
mands and the administration
conceded point after point. Jan-
uary 2 of this year Chancellor
Strong was granted a leave of
absence "to recuperate from his
recent illness." Martin Meyerson,
dean of the College of Environ-
mental Design, was designated as
"acting chancellor."
On January 3, Meyerson issued
a statement effecting a compro-
mise between the students and the
administration. The statement
said the steps of Sproul Hall
would be available temporarily as
an open discussion area to be
used by individuals and student
organizations. Tables could be set
up for political groups at vari-
ous campus entrances.
Most recent events at Berkeleyj
came as a result of the organiza-
tion calling themselves the Foul
Speech Movement. It was the con-
tention of this very small minor-
ity of Berkeley students that free-
dom of speech included the right
to foul speech and they decided
to test their rights. The adminis-
tration and other student organi-
zations cracked down on the group
and nine were arrested.
Shortly thereafter President

Kerr and Acting Chancellor Mey-
erson submitted their resigna-
tions to the Board of Regents.
No reasons were given for the
threatened resignations. But spec-
ulations were that pressure from
the Board of Regents for the dis-
missal of the arrested students
was an important factor, since
Kerr and Meyerson did not wish
to deal so severely with them.
The resignations were with-
drawn when an understanding
was apparently reached between
Kerr and Meyerson and the Re-
gents.
New demonstrations were spark-
ed by a magazine entitled "Spi-
der." This publication, which Act-
ing Chancellor Meyerson termed
"inappropriate for a university
community," allegedly contained a
number of previously banned four-
letter words and a play with a
suggestive title.
Ban 'Spider'
Some 200 demonstrators stood
in front of the administration
building Thursday, March 19, as
Dean of Men Arleigh Williams
tried to enforce a ban on the sale
of the publication.
Williams said he would ask the
political action committee for F
campus injunction against the sale
pending a hearing, and that is
where things stand at present.
Events in Berkeley have not
reached an end. No one has defi-
nitely won or lost.
Former Governor of California
Pat Brown unwittingly character-
ized the whole Berkeley move-
ment in a commencement address
at Santa Clara University, say-
ing, "Some students are going to
be wrong and some people will
want to deny them the right to
make mistakes . . . But let us
stand up for our students and be
proud of them. If America is
still on the way up, it will wel-
come this new, impatient, criti-
cal group of young gadflies. It
will be fearful only of the com-
placent and passive."

U OF M FACULTY, STAFF & STUDENT
GROUP FLIGHT TO EUROPE
Round Trip Jet (not charter) New York-London
June 1st Flight (11 week stay) $333.20
Flight returns Aug. 17th and includes 1 day in Bermuda
Information from Les Thurston, 663-5718

SENIOR CITIZENS' RELIEF:
Tax Committee Delays Bill

U.S. Hits Radar Stations,
Reaffirms Aid Commitment
SAIGON, Viet Nam (P)--Squadrons of United States warplanes
slashed yesterday at four North Vietnamese radar stations.
One was on Bach Long Island deep in the Tonkin Gulf formed
by the shores of North Viet Nam and Red China.
And in Washington, official sources reported that the U.S. is com-
mitted to the defense of South Viet Nam regardless of whether Russia
or Red China sends in "volunteers." Concerning yesterday's bombings,
a U.S. Navy spokesman said bombs ranging from 250 to 1000 pounds
were loosed on stations at Bach

By THOMAS R. COPI
The quick state Senate action
hoped for by the House on the
bill to provide property tax ex-
emptions for senior citizens does
not seem to be forthcoming.
The Senate Taxation Commit-
tee, which is presently consider-
ing the measure, is holding the
first of three scheduled public
hearings on the issue today in
St. Clair Shores. If all the public
hearings scheduled by the com-
mittee are held, the bill cannot,
possibly clear the Senate before
April 7. This would give Gov.
George Romney time to consider
his awaited study committee re-
port on the subject before sign-
ing or vetoing the bill.
The House passed the bill by
a 62-36 vote last week, in an ap-
parent attempt to pass such a
tax relief bill before Romney has
a chance to introduce a similar
plan, House Minority Leader Rob-
ert Waldron (R-Grosse Pointe),
said. Romney is waiting for his
study committee to report before
drawing up his bill.
House Speaker Joseph Kowal-
ski (D-Detroit) said he hoped for
rapid Senate action, but Sen.
George Fitzgerald (D - Grosse
Pointe), chairman of the Senate
Taxation Committee, apparently
has no inclination to rush the bill
through the Senate as was done
in the House.
Fitzgerald said that the Senate
would probably put an income
limit or means test on the senior
citizens property tax exemption
bill. The House bill set no in-
come maximum, merely stating
that to be eligible, the senior
citizens must have lived in Mich-
igan for seven years.
"You've got to draw a line be-
tween the person who needs re-
lief and the one who doesn't.
Otherwise it's ridiculous," Fitz-
gerald said.
The taxation committee has also
discovered that the House bill
would provide no benefit for some
35,000 of the state's neediest sen-
ior citizens, while costing the state
an additional $1 million in lost,

federal aid funds, Fitzgerald re-
ported.
The 35,000 are covered by the
bill, but their benefits would be
subtracted from an Old Age As.
sistance funds they now receive,
according to social welfare direc-
tor Bernard Houston.
Thus, the state would be sub-
stituting help which it finances
100 per cent for present benefits
paid 50 per cent by the state and
50 per cent by the federal govern-
ment.
The state benefits would be con-
sidered income and therefore be
subtracted from the OAA pay-
ments, thus providing no addi-
tional benefits to those who al-
ready receive OAA money, Fitz-
Put
your degree
to work

gerald said.
The Senate committee is also
investigating the constitutionality
of the bill, which would grant'
both property owners and renters
an exemption. The constitltion
states that "no law shall embrace
more than one object." Fitzgerald
said that preliminary research
showed a possible conflict and
that he would probably seek an
attorney general's opinion.

Cologne, After ShaveTalc, Deodorant, Soap Bar, Gift Sets Caryl Richards, New York
CAMPUS CORNER PHARMACY
818 State Street

COME TO CHURCH

ON THE

SAB BATH

Germans Face
Possible Split
BONN, Germany ()-The res-
ignation of Justice Minister Ewald
Bucher because of passage of a
)ill extending through 1969 the
hunt for Nazi murderers set off
a struggle yesterday in West Ger-
many's coalition that could lead
to a government crisis.
Bucher's Free Democratic Par-
ty, smaller member of the coali-
tion, said "a serious situation has
arisen." Without this party's sup-
port, Chancellor Ludwig Erhard
could not command a parliamen-
tary majority.
The justice minister submitted
his resignation Thursday night
after the Bundestag overrode his
objections and voted to continue
the search for Nazi murderers un-
til Jan. 1, 1970. Bucher and oth-
ers professed grave doubt as to
the constitutionality of the law.
Erhard, seeing coalition leaders
in a series of meetings yesterday,
told the Free Democrats to name
another one of their members as
a successor to Bucher, whose res-
ignation still has not been for-
mally accepted.

Long and three, mainland centers
-Ha Tinh, Cape Ron and Vinh
Son. Two were reported damaged
heavily and two moderately.
Planes Downed . -
Two Navy planes-an A-4 Sky-
hawk and an F-8 Crusader-were
shot down in the gulf, but both
pilots were rescued unhurt by
U.S. Air Force patrols. One was
plucked from the sea by an
amphibian, the other by helicop-
ter.
A spokesman said that so far,
the U.S. government does not have
hard evidence of men and mater-
ials flowing to Hanoi from her
giant Communist colleagues in re-
sponse to U.S. air strikes on Red
North Viet Nam.
Possibility
In reporting this, the U.S. sourc-
es said they are not ruling out
the possibility that some such aid
may have arrived in North Viet
Nam already, perhaps hidden in
boat holds. Nor did they discount
she possibility that such assist-
ance might be forthcoming.
However, the officials said, the
U.S. is not basing its actions in
Viet Nam on a prediction of what
the Soviets and Red Chinese are
going to do.

When the degree is finally yours,
what do you plan to do with
it? You'll find that many good
jobs require women with col-
lege backgrounds. But, they
often require women with sec-
retarial skills or business
knowledge, too. Will you have
marketable skills? Katharine
Gibbs School offers expert
training in secretarial and busi-
ness subjects; the Course for
College Womenttakes just 81/2
months. You'll be smart to
come to Gibbs firt-then you
can put your degree to work!
Write College Dean
for GIBBS GIRLS AT WORK
KATHARINE GIBBS
SECRETARIAL
21 Marlborough St., BOSTON, MASS. 02118
200 Park Ave., NEW YORK, N. Y. 10017
33 Plymouth St., MONTCLAIR, N. J. 07042
77 S. Angell St., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 02906

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Postor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services, with Holy
Communion, Sermon by Pastor, "Tongue
Control."
1 1 :15 a.m.-Bible Class.
6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper.
6:45 p.m. - Talk by German Ecumenical
Leader Pastor Max Lackmann, Co-Founder
of the LeaguecfordEvangelical-Catholic Re-
union. Public cordially invited.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. and 10:00 p.m.-Lenten Services.
8:30 p.m.-Chapel Assembly meeting.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Services at 9:30 and 11:00
a.m.-Sermon.topic: "Selma: Symbol of
Social Change."
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Cante bur/' House.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY
11 :00 o.m.-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m. and 12:40 p.m.
Penitential Office and Holy Communion

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.-"Where On
Earth-For Christ's Sake," The, Rev. J. F.
King, Jr. (visiting minister).
Bible Lecture, 10:30 a.m.-Prof. G. B. Har-
rison.
Church School, 9:30 a.m.-crib-9th grade;
11:15 a.m.---crib-6th grade.
Wednesday Lenten Service, 7:30 p.m.-Doug-
las Chapel.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
730 Tappan 662-4245
Russell M. Fuller, Pastor

Sunday Worship-10:45 a.m.
CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe 662-5189
J. E. Edwards, Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar on
Christian Thought.

Historic

OPENS TUESDAY!

an
unusual
one-year program
JUNIOR YEAR
at
1 r
NEW YORK
--__ ";NIVERSITY
Three undergraduate colleges offer students from all parts of
the United States an opportunity to spend their junior year in
the stimulating environment of the University's Washington
Square Center. Small classes; new residence halls.
Program open to students who are recommended by the deans
of the colleges to which they will return for their degrees.
Washington Square College of Arts and Science
School of Commerce School of Education
- i

Professional Theatre
Program
and
Creative Arts Festival
present
v~~ v/h i-

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:15 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:45 a.m.
Holy Baptism--First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY - Masses at 7:00, 8:15, 9:30,
10:45, 12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY - Masses at 7:00,
8:00, 9:00, 12:00 and 5:00 psm.
WEDNESDAY - 7:30 p.m.-Marian Scripture
Devotions. Confessions following.
SATURDAY - Confessions: 3:30-5:30; 7:30-
9:30 p.m.
DARLINGTON LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Wisconsin Synod)
3545 Packard
Robert A. Baer, Pastor
Sunday Worship--10:30 a.m.
Lenten Services-7:30 p.m., Wednesday
For Transportation Call: Rev. Baer, NO 2-2091
or Dick Brucker, 662-1474.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting at YM-YWCA 350 S. Fifth
Rev. Walter R. Petersen, Pastor
9:45 o.m.-Sunday Bible School.
S11:00 a.m.-Service.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Gospel Hour,
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-Midweek Bible Studies
and Prayer Service.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
493 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Rizer,
and Rev. A. G. Hobermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenow
The Rev. Donald Postema
Morning Service, 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service, 7:00 p.m.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Campus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "God and Our Daily Bread."
10:15 a.m. - Student Seminar, Social Hall.
Current Issues Class. Speaker, Dr. G. Rob-
inson Gregory.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. "The Church in Emerging Na-
tions."
TUESDAY
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Dinner in Pine Room.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Bissell's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din-
ner. "Contemporary Issues in Protestant
Theology," Dr. Patrick Murray, Office of
Religious Affairs,
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
For transportation call 662-4018
11 :00 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 8
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.

I'

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 90 years of age.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.

I

A BRILLIANT STUDY OF THE NEGRO STRUGGLE
FOR FREEDOM IN AMERICA.

SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Church Center located
church.

at the

I Off Broadway's I

"THE PAIN,
TE HUMR.

i

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