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March 19, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r ruM. At 19 MARCH 19o5

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

j x

ivo~f aY. Ig ARY V. a-aErsCHIGNsDALY AGE EVE

M

Faces

'Greatly

Improved'

Tiger

By LLOYD GRAFFr
Acting Associate Sports EditorY
Special To The Daily
PORTLAND, Ore.-"Man, have
they jelled."'
That's the line on Princeton
from people who have seen them
all season.
Princeton is a team whose star,
Bill Bradley, is sodmagnificent
that Walt Hazzard, Bradley's
teammate on the Olympic team,
called him the "White 0'." Many
other observers agree that he is t
the finest all-around college play-
er since Oscar Robertson.j
Yet the paradoxical thing is
T that it is probably not Bradley,
but the four other players who
play with him that will decide
whether Michigan or Princeton,
will win tonight's NCAA semi-k
final contest.
x Greatly Improved'
Michigan assistant Coach Tom
Jorgensen who saw the Tigersj
beat North Carolina State and
Providence in the Eastern re-
gional puts it this way:
"They were a greatly improved
team in the regional because the
other boys besides Bradley were
playing good ball."
TV Coverage
T h e .Princeton - Michigan
NCAA semifinal game will be
televised nationally by the
Sports Network Inc., Channel
2, and broadcast over WUOM-
FM and WAAM (1600). The]
game starts at 10 p.m. EST.
Bradley can score 40 points and
Princeton will still lose unless his
teammates show something be-
sides their numbers.
Michigan beat Bradley and as-
sociates last December in a game
that was a dramatist's dream. The
Wolverines were down by 12
points with 3:30 to go. Bill Brad-
ley bad scored 41 points and ab-
solutely dominated the game.
Then the pangs of exhaustion hit
him and .he committed the foul
of a tired man; he hooked the

man who was dribbling around
him. It was his fifth and as he
dejectedly walked off, the Madison
Square Garden crowd, known for
its callousness toward basketball,
gave him a three-minute standing
ovation.
Tigers Collapse
Princeton then collapsed like a
pillar of salt and Michigan won
with a last-second jump shot by
Cazzie Russell. Michigan beat
Princeton, but unquestionably lost
to Bradley.
"The most ridiculous question
I've ever been asked came after
that game," says Coach Dave
Strack. "Someone asked me if we

would have won it if Bradley
hadn't fouled out."
But against Providence in the
regional, Princeton won 109-69
with Bradley getting 41. In other
words, the "mortals," Bradley's
teammates got 68 points, just one
less than Providence.
More than IM Stars
They showed that tley were
more than just glorified intra-
mural players. Intramural players
don't score 68 points against a
team of Providence's caliber. The
Friars had lost only once all sea-
son and had beaten third-ranked
St. Joseph's the night before.
Who are these "mortals" who

help the young god, Bradley?
DON HAARLOW - Haarlow, a
junior, is generally considered the
second best player on the team.
He averaged 9.6 points .per game
during the season, but hit for 15
a game in the regional. At 6'3,"
190, he is a bit small by Big Ten
standards for a forward, but Jor-
gensen says he moves well and
has a good shot from the corner.
Haarlow, from Hinsdale, Ill., is
the :son of Bill Haarlow, a former
Big Ten basketball star at the
University of Chicago. He ought
to have a good idea how the Wol-
verines play because his dad is
now Supervisor of Basketball Of-

ficials for the Big Ten. last Princeton game and did an
ROBINSON BROWN - Center adequate job. At 6'2" he plays
Robbie Brown at 6'9," 200. is a guard and is reputed to be the
sophomore whom Jorgensen calls best outside shooter on the team,
"much improved since December." besides Bradley. Jorgensen feels
He has become more aggressive that he might be replaced by Ed
under the boards and is the Hummer, who is four inches taller.
team's second leading rebounder,|If this happens Bradley would
behind guess who. He is averag- probably be switched to guard.
ing 6.8 points per game.
,1T J T±±uiv1 i1'b - ft ixun an.

II

DON RODENBACH -
bach had the unenviable
ment of guarding Cazzie

Roden-
assign-
in the

ED HUMMER - A sixth man
who has appeared in every one
of Princeton's 27 games, Hummer
averages 8.2 points per game,

SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY?
Netters Lose Three in Dixie

Squad
third highest on the team. At
6'6" Jorgensen feels Princeton
may start him to get extra size
on the boards.
GARY WALTERS-The sopho-
more guard is the team's play-
maker. Averaging 7.3 a game, he
will be the smallest man on the
court at 5'10."
If Hummer plays. Princeton will
be able to match Michigan in size,
something few teams this season
have been able to do.
With Bradley and the "mor-
tals," nobody in the Michigan
family is saying the Tigers don't
have teeth.
Wolverines Have Teeth
But the Wolverines have teeth
too and they've bitten off victories
in 15 of their last 16 games. And
you can be sure they aren't going
to hold back against Princeton.
But Strack says Michigan is
planning nothing different to cope
with Bradley. "We've got no gim-
mick defense," he says.
Although he has not revealed
how to intends to stop the kid
from Crystal City and his side-
kicks, indications are that he will
put George Pomey on Bradley,
man-to-man, with the others
playing a zone. One thing for sure,
Russell will not start out guard-
ing Bradley and Bradley will not
start on Russell.
Michigan is healthy as is
Princeton. This contrasts with last
year when the Wolverines went
to Kansas City for the cham-
pionships with Cazzie limping
around with a bruised ankle. The
only Wolverine under trainer Jim
Hunt's care is Oliver Darden who
is still hobbled slightly by blisters
left over from Lexington.

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
JIM LaS!OVAGE
AT ANN ARBOR'S
NEWEST BOOKSTORE
the poetry of
'WARREN
BERRYMAN
LOWELL
contemporary literature
scholarly editions
in the humanities
french and german books
24fcin i oett
1321 South University
between Forest & Washtenaw
open noon to midnight
Monday through Saturday

By BUD WILKINSON
The Michigan tennis squad lost'
all three of its meets on its spring
trip last week, but the trip was
still successful in the eyes of
Coach Bill Murphy.
The netters lost once to a
tough Mississippi State team and
twice to Miami, a perennial ten-
nis powerhouse.
"I thought the team played
very well," explained Murphy
yesterday. "I was very pleased by
their play. We never really ex-
pected to beat either team. It
was our first chance to play out-
doors and both of the southern
teams had been out for several
weeks."
Hard Changeover
The changeover from the very
fast hardwood indoor courts to
the much slower clay or compo-
sition courts is a big one and is
difficult to make in a short time.
"(Jerry) Stewart played ex-
tremely well and (Karl) Hedrick's
play was better than I thought it
would be. Everyone played as well
as or better than I expected,"
Murphy elaborated.

Stewart, who returned to his Murphy explained the main
home state of Florida on the tour, purpose of the trip as "an oppor-
is the team's only sophomore. He tunity to get the boys used to
played sixth singles in the first playing outside and to get some
two meets and third singles in the idea of how they line up. They get
final meet. tired of playing each other all the

Only Victor
Stewart was the only singles
player to win in the Wolverines'
first clash with Miami as ne de-
feated Dave Tate, 6-0, 6-8, 9-7.
Hedrick, a junior, was Mich-
igan's number two singles player
last year behind graduated Cap-
tain Harry Fauquier and reached
the finals of the Big Ten tourney
in the number two spot. He play-
ed in the number one singles spot
on the southern trip.
He and Captain Brian Flood,
racked up the only Michigan win
(except for a win by default in
second doubles) in the Wolver-
ines' loss to Mississippi State as
they took the first doubles match,
6-4, 2-6, 6-1.

Swimmers, Pucksters Get
Letters for Winter Service

time and it does them good to play
other teams early in the season."
Murphy hasn't yet made a
final decision on what positions
the netmen will occupy, but he is
basing his decision on the play
during the southern trip and on
the results of a series of matches
which are being held now.
The Wolverines lost the Mis-
sissippi State meet and the first
meet against the Hurricanes by
identical 7-2 scores. In the first
Miami meet, besides the win by
Stewart, the Blue took only the
third doubles where Bo Barker
and Jim Swift disposed of their
opponents, 6-3, 6-4.
In the second game with the
Hurricanes, Murphy experimented
with the lineup in order to better
determine the team's strength.
Many of the matches were close,
but the netmen lost, 9-0.
The team will continue to prac-
tice indoors every day- until the
weather permits outdoor play.
Murphy does not expect the courts
to be in condition for play for at
least two or three weeks.
YOUR PLACE
IN THE SUN
On Large Balcony
Modern Luxury Apt. 4-Man
Air-conditioned;
fully carpeted;
paneled study;
garbage disposal.
663-7359
No. 7
326 E. Madison

PYRAMID BUILDING? No, these four players are just waiting
for the basketball to come back. Bill Buntin jumps in an attempt
to gain the vantage point, while Oliver Darden seems sand-
wiched between Henry Finkel and Bob Sullivan of Dayton.
- - - - - - -

Athletic Director H. O. (Fritz)"
Crisler announced Tuesday that
36 Michigan athletes in two sports
-swimming and hockey - have
earned their letters for the 1964-
65 season.
Letters will be awarded to thc
19 members of the hockey squad
at the Dekers' banquet next Tues-
day at ' p.m. Freshman numerals
will also be awarded to 13 mem-
bers of the freshman hockey
squad.
The 19 swimmers earning letters in-
clude Edward Bartsch, Ed Booth nan.
Bruce Brown, Don Ewing, Bill Farley,~
Bill Groft, Bob Hoag, Russell Kingery;
Tom O'Malley, Rees Orland, Lanny?
Reppert, Carl Roble, Paul Scheerer,
Tom Schwarten, John Vry, Richard
Walls, and Tom Wlliams.
The hockey letter winners are Rob-
NIT
Seminals
St. John's 67, Army 6bi
Vilanova 91, NY U 69
NCAA HOCKEY
Semifinals
Boston College 4, North Dakota 3
NHL
Detroit 10, Boston 3
Mtontreal 4, Toronto 1
NBA
Cincinnati 113, Baltimore 110
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Philadelphia 6, Detroit 3 (12 inn)
Cincinnati 4, St. Louis 1
Chicago (A) 6, New York (A) 5
Los Angeles (N) 13, Washington 4
Houston 7, New York (N) 4
Vittsburgh 7, Kansas City 1
Boston 7, Cleveland 2
Los Angeles (A) 8, San Francisco 7
(10 inn)

ert Baird, Robert Boysen, Hank Brand,
Pierre Dechaine, Bob Ferguson, Ed-
ward Henderson, Alex Hood,.Dean Lu-
cier, Barry MacDonald, Wilfred Mar-
tin, Mike Marttila, David Newton, Greg
Page, Tom Polonic, Marty Read, Tom
Schiller, Mark Thompson, Mel Waka-
bayashi, and Dan Walter.
Freshman numeral winners in hockey
are Robert Ball, Richard Burns, Wil-
1iam Darling, Ray Demers, William
Freeman, Harold Herman, Martin Lip-
ton, William Lord, Michael Moir, Tom
Pullen, Ronald Ulyot, Robert Weyh-
ing, and Bruce Koviak.

MICHIGAN
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Sophomore preferred-any field
prefer career interest in marketi
sales management-must be a
campus leader.
SPECIAL INTERVI
MON., MAR. 22
Student Activities Bldg.
SUMMER PLACEMENT OFFICE-
9 A.M.-1 P.M.
Equal Opportunity Employe

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11

If your roommate
says the Bell System helped invent
hi-fi, stereo and talking movies,

4

don't bet. You'll lose.

In the course of their studies of the nature
of sound, Bell System scientists have been
able to make significant contributions to all
three forms of entertainment.
You might say that it was because the dis-

study of sound ever undertaken by anyone.
To capture sound for study, Bell Telephone
Laboratories developed the first electronic re-
corder for phonograph discs. For the first
time, performers recorded into microphones.
m l---- -- 11T L

multi-channel disc-the basis of today's stereo-
phonic industry.
Nevertheless, these contributions were by-
products of the real effort, which was to make
telephone service better. We are proud, of
r that thev helned build and imorove

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