100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 19, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, 19 MARCH 1965

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, 19 MARCH 1965

Says State
Needs Better
Instructors
(Continued from Page 1)
ing services "so that students may
find the right institution and the
right program."
These recommendations paral-
lel many current goals and plans
of the University. Dean William
Haber of the literary college
pointed this out yesterday in cit-
ing the recent report of the ex-
ecutive committee of the literary
college. The college document
placed greater emphasis on teach-
er training and evaluation.
It called for a special program
for "the training of college
teachers for service in the state,"
departmentalsevaluation of jun-
ior staff, changes in the lecture
system and more individual free-
dom of teachers in deciding
teaching methods.
Associate Dean Charles F. Leh-
mann of the education school yes-
terday expressed agreement with
the recommendations of the
"blue ribbon" report. "The next
decade will be a return to teach-
ing," he declared.
More Attention
"The University will pay greater
attention to good teaching as it
has already started to do through
student course evaluations, reci-
tations led by senior professors
and seminars for young instruc-
tors."
Vice-President for Academic Af-
fairs Roger Heyns noted yester-
day that while the University is
concerned about the same goals
that the report expresses, it does
not have unlimited money to
reach them. lHowever, the re-
quests are valid and represent a
firm statement of support for
higher education, he added.
Faculty members also express-
ed doubts about the immediate
practicability of the "blue rib-
bon" report's recommendations.
Prof. Marvin Felheim of the
English department said many
changes and reforms are desir-
able but that "things are too -well
established for wholesale changes
right now."
Felheim emphasized the con-
servatism of the University and
said he is "pessimistic about im-
mediate change, but there is a
greater possibility of eventual,
long-term reform.''
Such "long-tern" reform in
quality and quantity of instruc-
tion might be achieved by follow-
ing the report's recommendations,
especially those in the areas of
emphasis on creative teaching,
staff reorganization and scholar-
ships and loans to prospective col-
lege teachers, he said.
The report's proposals for in-
creasing the quantity of instruc-
tion also includerthe tapping of
all available sources of potential
teachers, such as retired faculty
members and faculty wives.
Concern with Quality
The report's concern with qual-
ity as well as quantity of instruc-
tion is also shown by its recom-
mendations of inservice training
and studies of new techniques.
This concern has been an impor-
tast one at the University re-
cently.
A faculty report here last De-
cember stressed the importance of
constituting departments "in a
way such that the teaching func-
tion is not inadvertently made
subordinate to scholarly produc-
tivity or service."
Lines Up with
Recent Trends

In Education
(Continued from Page 1)
The community colleges, afraid
of being trampled in the fracas
added their collective voices to the
chaos. And the tidal wave of "ba-
by boom" students was about tc
break on the system.
Yet most of the universities-
this University among them -
balked at the idea of any en
forced coordination of their ac-
tivities. The "blue-ribbon" com
mittee's potent informal power
seemed virtually the only possi
ble unifying factor.
Since then, the conflicts hav'
continued-as witness the contro-
versies over Michigan State's pro
posed medical school and the
University's Flint expansion-bu'
the "blue ribbon" group is no
longer the sole potential media
tor. The state Board of Educa-
tion seems .intent on interpret-
ing broadly its constitutionally
established authority as "the gen
eral planning and coordinating
body for all public education.'
And the individual institutions
appear to be clinging less dofeed
ly to the principle of complet";
autonomy.
In addition, there is the ques-
tion of how solidly the divers-
membership of the "blue rib-
bon" committee supports the doc
ument. The group quickly closec'
its meetings to press and public
so there is no indication yet
__, .- __... ; -n. +n ve., z m -n e n a

THE EMBLEM NEAR the entrance of Flint College symbolizes
the relationship between the University and its branch. Although
the report of the "blue ribbon" committee does not advocate
specificallya severing of ties between such branches and the
main campuses, it does stress institutional independence as a
guiding principle.
Committee Tells Board:
Take More Control

(Continued from Page 1)
powers.
At no point, however, does the
report officially take a stand on
its first specific test of power:
the University's plans to expand
its two-year Flint College into a
four-year institution.
.Recent rumors had suggested
that the committee might take a
firm stand on this subject in view
of the state-wide controversy sur-
rounding the expansion.
Plans for the expansion have
been in serious question since Gov.
George Romney opposed the move
in his 1965-66 budget message.
Although it does not tackle this
issue, the report condemns the
concept of branches in favor of
autonomous institutions under
separate governing boards.
The report states: "branches
may take the brunt of a budget
squeeze. They may serve too much
as a faculty training ground for
the parent institutions. They may
not have the flexibility . . . that
is wanted of an institution."
The report offers one variation'
of this concept which is not spe-
cifically applied but could relate
to Flint. The report states: "It
might be possible to retain some
of the advantages inherent in
the branch device for starting a
new institution quickly if an es-
tablished institution were to spon-

sor a new institution for a period;
of time."
Board President Thomas J.
Brennan has repeatedly declared'
himself in favor of this idea for
Flint and University President
Harlan H. Hatcher has conceded
he would not object to it.
The bulk of the report, written
before the current controversy,
clearly suggests that its interests
range far beyond Flint.,
For example, the most dramatic
language urges the board to "be
prepared at all Mimes to apply
pressure on the institutions" if'
they refuse to obey suggestions.
Before this enlargement on the
board's powers, those powers had
been fairly narrowly interpreted
by state college administrators to
the constitutional charge of pro-
viding the "general planning and
coordinating body for all public
education."
Brennan said yesterday that al-
though the board would attempt
to operate on a cooperative basis,
"We intend to fulfill the obliga-
tions of planning and coordinat-
ing. If this requires pressure, then
pressure will be used.'
He emphasized, however, that he
felt the only way the board could
be really effective was if college
administrators were not forced to
comply, but rather desired to com-
ply, with the board decisions.
Charles Orlebeke, educational
aide to Romney, said yesterday
that such pressure would be exert-
nA ,rfhn npiUc f b d uuatnrv r -

Backs Link
For Growth,
Construction
(Continued from Page 1)
should be assumed until demon-
strated otherwise that well-
established graduate and graduate-
professional programs at specific
institutions will be a part of the
state plan.
"Requests for funds to meet the
capital needs of such programs
may be exped'ted when considered
essential by the State Board, the
(Lansing) administration, and
the Legislature. New programs
should not be ruled out indis-
criminately, but requests for them
should be given special scrutiny."
The consideration of financing
also touches on:
-The merits of a consolidated
budget request;
-A proposal for two-year bud-
get planning;
j -State support of community
college operating costs and capital
outlay, and
-Proposed long-term financing
arrangements for capital improve-
ments.
The report further:
,Discusses financing of univer-
sity branches, advocating that
"appropriations for branches be
listed separate from those for
their parents";
-Recommends establishment of
uniform system of cost accounting
and reporting and uniform def-
inition of accounting terms;
-Comments on higher tuition
charges for out-of-state or out-
of-district students, proposing that
the additional charge be paid for
by the student's home state or
district;
-Urges liberalization of state
loan and scholarship programs to
reach a greater number of quali-
fied applicants, and
-Calls for adequate financing
for the State Board and depart-
ment of educatioi to support the
staff necessary to fulfill;their con-
stitutional tasks.
Commenting favorably on a
Michigan Council of State College
Pres dents proposal, the committee
urges the State Board to give
"careful consideration" to a con-
soiidated budget request.
The committee further asks the
exploration of "the advantages
and feasibility of supporting the
retcu.us s or appropriations for
a iisca. year with two-year budget
projections." The first year's pro-
jeccion would tie in with the re-
quest for appropriat ons; the sec-
ond year's projection would "serve
as a Oazis for study and planning."

D
I
N
'I
N
C
U
T
T
0

N
I
C
H
T

Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
}~

- - - - -- 0 -- 0 - OWEN

. .

STEAK AND SHAKE
1313 South University
HAMBURGER STEAK
Potatoes, Bread and Butter, Salad . $1.00
LIVER AND ONIONS
Potatoes, Bread and Butter, Salad . . $1.00

f
f

OLD HE!IBERG

I

anownese me

fi - --- - r :._____________- ---- -. ---- -------- ,-- E-

i, f

STOP IN AFTER THE SHOW

}i

211-213 N. Main St.

668-9753

iC
II

Ann Arbor's Newest Restaurant
A SPECIAL DINNER EVERY SUNDAY
'421EAST LIBERTY
665-7003
Now Open 'til Midnight Monday thru Sunday
"Fine Food in Fine Surroundings"

I.

_-- '!F

DON'T
WALK
Run
to...
r yPANCAKE HOUSE ao

Iva ..
nd COFFEE SHOP

w.,
i
."' ! Al
c', r
y
E
J 4
" r^
r
z
t
,
to, 40
t.e ! r
r"
C

c Th rr
~i~s~T:ZOO
tiV
14
c (q

)

I

Local Units
Emphasized
(Continued from Page 1)
could not afford further educa-
tion. This proximity also enables
adults to use their facilities for
training and refresher courses
while holding a job, the report
explains.
Specifically, the plan calls for
1) the expansion of the number
of colleges, 2) the re-organiza-
tion of existing institutions and
3) their integration with the
other institutions of higher edu-
cation in the same locality.
" Expansion. The plan offered
divides the state into 29 com-
munity college districts, instead
of the 18 now in existence. The
additional colleges would accom-
modate more students as well as
making the colleges within com-
muting distance for easy accessi-
bility, the report states.
0 Reorganization. The commit-
tee calls for internal changes,
but it strongly feels that the addi-
tion of the third and fourth years
would defeat the purpose of the
college. Its function is to provide
"open door" education for any
high school graduates not leading
them to a degree. It must not be
used only by those people who
have the initiative to get an edu-
cation. It must help to instill the
people with that initiative, the
report declares.
The organization of their own
governing board would insure that
the colleges could work for their
own best interests. In this way
the college, the report says, could
institute a curriculum that would
serve all the educational needs of
the community.
The committee goes on to say
that "the modern comprehensive
community college, as distinct!
from its predecessor, the strictly
liberal arts-oriented junior col-
lege, is the most suitable educa-
tional facility yet devised for pro-
viding this indispensable service."
* Integration. The committee
emphasizes the importance of the
State Board of Education in co-
ordinating the other existing in-
stitutions of higher education
with the community college.
Branches of four-year colleges
serve the same functions as their
main institutions w h i c h are
"oriented to baccalaureate or"
even higher degree programs.""
They do not replace community:
colleges, the report asserts. Four-
year institutions and community;
.,li ._ -- .hn l n nve fr m ,,

ed in the process of ouge iary re-
view. TeOrIt FavorsI
The board, under the new state
constitution, is empowered to ad-1
vise the Legislature with regardto Delta Branch
f. nances. In a situation where a D i a c
college became reticent about ac-
cepting a board decision, the re-Establishment
port emphasizes that "the Legis-
lature would be in a strong posi- (Continued from Page 1)
tion to support the board." The student enrollment at the
In a second imajor extension of hundergraduate level in the state Is
board power, the report recom- projected to increase by at leas'
mends that "any institution plan- 49 per cent by 1975, the commit-
ning to offer a new program tee predicts. The University has
should file a justification for do- predicted an increase of 72 per
g so with the State Board cent in its own student enroll-
Education'.mn"
ment.
This, almost more than the pos- Other steps mentioned to com-
sibilities of the use of financial batthis total influx include the
pressure on reticent institutions, encouragement of higher enroll-
s expected to allow the boar t ments in the smaller state insti-
enter into what has until now been~met in themle statepinsti-
considered the "internal affairs" tutions and in the state's private
four-year colleges.

I

with prices you can afford
W. Stadium Blvd. at W. Liberty St.
FOR--SUNDAY-

4.
apt

FOR SUNDAY
DINNER
Preketes'
Sugar Bowl

,
. ;
.
S
r
,
" 'may
s

ofstate colleges.
Document Asks
Coordination
On State Level,
(Continued from Page 1)
graduate areas individually. Sev-
eral pertain directly to the Uni-
versity.
In the field of business ad-
ministration the committee feels
that graduate study should be
offered only by those institutions
which have substantial experience
in the field and which are located
where the need for such advanced
work is sufficient to warrant its
availability.
The report states that an ad ii-
tional dental and law school fa-
cilities are not needed at this time.
However, the report recognizes
the inadequacy of the medical fa-
cilities at present. The commit-
tee would rather see the top-
priority development of the med-
ical schools at the University aid
at Wayne State University.
This is partly in line with aI
recent report signed by the Uni-
versity which called for the Uni-
versity and Wayne State Univer-
sity to get top priority on si ate
medical funds.
Their new and planned facili-
ties are not paid off yet.1
That agreement, however, pro-1
vided for Michigan State to begin
a two-year medical program. The
"blue ribbon" report opposes thisl
step on the grounds it will blos-
som into an expensive four-year.
institution before the state re-s
quires the additional facilities.f
noTen t pnhnS nurrno f the

Enrollment Increases
The report indicates, however
that enrollment increases in the
community colleges and in the
fqur-year state institutions arc
to be ex;ected.
The committee notes that only
four of Michigan's 10 standard
metropolitan areas lack a state-
supported- four-year institution o'
higher education. They are Bay
City, Saginaw, Flint, and Jack-
son. Of the four, Flint is being
primed as a four-year branch of
the University, and Jackson is at
present too small to warrant con-
sideration.
All proposals for the spread of
state-supported four-year institu-
tions throughout the state must
be coordinated by the State Board
of Education, the committee says.
Opposes Delay
"Undue delay and indecisior
are sure to invite areas to look
for solutions of their own, solu-
tions which may result in the es-
,ablishment of the wrong educa
tional institutions, or their es-
tablishment in the wrong loca
tions."
This has been interpreted as
reference to the controversy sur-
rounding the creation of a four
year, degree-granting college it
;he Thumb area dating back t-
1956. At that time, Bay City Jun-
ior College was replaced by th,
two-year Delta College. It was
presumed that Delta, which wa-
being financed by the three coun-
ties, would eventually become v
four-year state-supported college.
Took Up Proposal
The Legislature took up the
proposal, but a study directed by
Dean John X. Jamrich of Michi-
gan State's education school all
but defeated the plan. Jamrich
suegestred leaving Delta exactly

Serving the
Students of

People and
Ann Arbor

4
6
t f
>( ,

Since 1903
with

" Quality food at the most reasonable prices
" Your favorite cocktails, beer, wine or champagne
" Celebrate your 21 st birthday at Preketes'
" A SPECIAL SUNDAY LENTEN DINNER

109 S. Main St.
NO 2-1414

Open 7 A.M.
to 2 A.M.

' 1

-------

s-
,, . f,
q
1
l
,4 ,

I'

Everyone's talking
about the beautiful,
newly remodeled

I

Collae fin

?r
3

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan