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January 12, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-12

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TUESDAY, 12 JANUARY 1965

THE MICH16AIN DAILY

PAGE TRIG

TUESDAY, 12 JANUARY 1965 TIlE MIUli1~iAN DAILY PAGE THREII

Johnson

To

Request'

More Aid To Education

F or
Cabinet Gets
Warning on
Party Unity
O'Brien Points Out
'Storm Signal to Us'
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson warned his cab-
inet yesterday the administration
cannot afford to take the heavy
Democratic majority in Congress
for granted in pushing for enact-
ment of its programs.
Johnson's comment was report-
ed by his special congressional
liaison assistant, Lawrence F. O'-
Brien.
"In our view the climate is good"
in Congress for passage of John-
son's program, O'Brien told a
group of labor leaders. "But we
cannot take these things for
granted."
Conference -
O'Brien, speaking to a legisla-
tive conference of the AFL-CIO,
said Johnson's word of caution was
given at a cabinet meeting yester-
day.
O'Brien noted the recent 224-
201 vote to liberalize the House
rules and said it would have fail-
ed without the help of 16 Repub-
licans.
"I think that is a storm signal
to us," O'Brien said.

r on

Poverty'
President To
Outline New
Legislation
Proposed Programs
To Cost $1.5 Billion
During First Year
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson will begin a rap-
id-fire series of requests to Con-
gress today with a message ex-
pected to chart education's role
in the "war" he has declared on
poverty.
In his State of the Union mes-
N sage last week, the President said
he would propose new programs of
sserted aid to education costing $1.5 bil-
r some lion the first year, and continu-
party's ing from pre-school to college.

GOP To
Establish
New U nt
WASHINGTON (A') - Creation
of a GOP braintrust including the
five living winners of the Re-
publican presidential nomination
was proposed yesterday at a meet-
ing of the party's congressional
leaders.
The new group, formally tagged
the Republican Coordinating Com-
mittee, would include various ele-
ments in the party and would be
headed by Republican National
Chairman Dean Burch "or who-
ever may occupy his office in the
future."
In addition to GOP presidential
nominees, the committee would in-
clude the 11 Senate and House
leaders, and five representatives
of the Republican Governors As-
sociation.
He said the National Commit-
tee, governors, House members,
former GOP officials and academ-
ic consultants, would be the sourc-
es of task force personnel.

NEW YORK (AP)-More than 1001
ships lay idle in ports from Maine
to Texas yesterday, marooned by
a vexing $20 million-a-day strike
of 60,000 East and Gulf Coast
longshoremen.
In a rare display of unity, the
AFL - CIO International Long-
shoremen's Association joined with
ship owners and the federal gov-
ernment in an effort to get the
dockers back to work.
But the possibility of a long
strike was expressed, and railroads
embargoed shipments to struck
ports for fear of a tieup of freight
cars.
Second in Three
The walkout, second in three
months, began midnight Sunday
after rebellious New York long-
shoremen rejected a contract
which one of their leaders called
"the best contract in the 72-year
history of the union."
ILA President Thomas Gleason

FROM MAINE TO TEXAS:
Lo0ngshoreman Strike; 100 Ships Idled

The chief issue apparently, as
it has been for more than five
days, was automation on the
docks. The proposed contract,
agreed to by ILA leaders but re-
pudiated by the rank and file,
would have allowed a reduction in
union work gangs over a three-
year period from their present size
of 20 men to 17.
Fully Offset
Although the reduction was ex-
pected to be fully offset by at-
trition-deaths and retirement of
longshoremen-the rank and file
dockers apparently remained con-
vinced that the automation provi-
sion represented a threat to their
jobs.
Asst. Secretary of Labor James
J. Reynolds, after an overnight
briefing of Labor Secretary W.
Willard Wirtz, returned from
Washington to take part in the

ILA strategy meeting. He had
warned the strikeds they can ex-
pect no further contract conces-
sions from shipping firms. He said:
"The bargaining. process is
over."
Also attending the meeting was
Al Zack, a close associate of AFL-
CIO President George Meany.
In Washington, White House
press secretary George Reedy told
reporters the President is being
kept fully informed but that John-
son regards the strike at this
point as entirely a Labor Depart-
ment matter, insofar as the fed-
eral government is concerned.
Behind the concern on all sides
lay the possible impact of the
waterfront strike on the nation's
economy. An East and Gulf Coast
strike normally takes a $20 mil-
lion a day toll of the nation's
economy.

called a strategy meeting of the
union leaders "to find out what:
the men really want and what it
will take now to satisfy them."
1i

THOMAS W. GLEASON

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"TAIWAN" (with slides)
Speaker: Dr. William R. Gable
Ass't Director, Inst. of Pub. Ad.

PRESIDENT JOHNSO
The presidential aide a
there may be a tendency fo
Democrats to feel their3

Burch, insisting that he isn'tI
about to leave his post, sat in
with the House and Senate leaders
as they mapped plans for the newE
council at a meeting of the party's
f Capitol hill leaders.
"I plan to go to Chicago as
chairman of the Republican Na-
tional Committee and return to
Washington as chairman of the
Republican National Committee,"
s Burch said as he left.
English End
Arms Buildun

majority is so large they may not
vote with the administration on
some occasions.
O'Brien told the AFL-CIO lead-
ers that their support is the ma-
jor element behind Johnson and
that the President will not suc-
ceed in his program without con-
tinuing support.
No Choice
"We have no choice but to con-
tinue our economic expansion," he
said, and added that many of
Johnson's programs are designed
to accomplish that aim.

Just a Starter
Many Washington sources be-
lieve the $1.5 billion figure i
just a starter, with annual costs
eventually reaching $3-5 billion.
It already is clear the empha-
sis will be on schools in the na-
tion's pockets of poverty.

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
LONDON-Prime Minister Harold Wilson of Britain and Soviet
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin have agreed to exchange visits later this
year.
Kosygin will come to Britain in the spring at 'a date still to be
fixed. Wilson will make his return visit later, at a tinie still to be
agreed upon.
S *
PANAMA-High school students burned an apparently homemade
American flag yesterday.
The burning was followed by a march of about 500 students to the
presidential palace. A spokesman said the purpose of the demonstra-
tion was to call on President Marco A. Robles to remove the National
Guard troops posted along the ------- ----------- __
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Johnson, it is reported, will pro-
pose direct grants to school dis-
tricts "impacted" by poverty, just
as the government now helps dis-
tricts "impacted" by large num-
bers of servicemen or defense in-
dustry employes.

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on 20 safety recommendations de-
signed to prevent another tragedy
like the loss of the atomic sub-
marine Thresher.

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IF UT the 3kIr1 V I INN INNUnion, League
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Tran Van Huong is expected to
issue a communique tomorrow
affirming that United States-Viet-
namese relations are friendly and
denying that the United Statesl
applied pressure on Viet Namn IiQC-ASSEMBLY PRESENT
the recent political crisis here.
UNITED NATIONS-Indonesia
boycotted a session of the 24-aT
nation Governing Council of the
United Nations special fund yes-
terday but the council did not
read it out of its post as second
vice-chairman. OC RPETERSON TI
Mexican Chairman Daniel Cosio OSCAR TRIO
Villegas put to the group the
question of re-electing "those
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