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February 24, 1965 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-24

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Seventy-Fifth Year
EDrTED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF TI-E UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

Each Time I Chanced To See Franklin D.
Begging the Question of Dormitory Fee Hikes
by _1. Neil Berkson

s Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MIcH.
Prevail

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552"

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staf writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

BAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1965

NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT JOHNSTON

The Dea'thof eAoi X
Doent Change A Thing

THE BRUTAL ASSASSINATION of Mal-
colm X was a tragic and regrettable
event, for Malcolm was a man who cared
for the welfare of his, fellows and was
concerned with the hypocrisy which rid-
dles U.S. society from top to bottom. He
may have been mistaken in many ways,
but he was a much better man than most
of his critics ever allowed.
But Malcolm's murder has only limit-
ed significance beyond its element of
personal tragedy. It can serve to. illus-
trate the evil effects that personal ambi-
tion and corruption have on any organi-
zation,: and it can highlight a fact which
became obvious when Malcolm X split
with the Black Muslims over a year ago:
Negro separatists have aims too narrow
to allow them to. develop a large and uni-
fied organization which could wield sig-
nificant influence in American life. But
Malcolm's death cannot be called a turn-
irg point in the separatist movement,
since the elements behind the strength
of the Black Muslims and those like
them have become much stronger and
moze significant than Malcolm X or any
oteie one man.
STAGE for Sunday's murder was
set over a year ago when Elijah Mu-"
haimmad expelled Malcolm X from the
Black Muslims. The reason given for the
expulsion was the unpleasant remarks
Malcolm made about the assassination
of President Kennedy. But all Involved
knew there was more behind the expul-
sior than this.
First, Malcolm X was an articulate and
attractive man-and an ambitious one.
He ,always said until his split from the
moement that he was only an amplifier
for the voice of his leader, the great
prophet Elijah Muhammad. But though
he only spoke for his leader, he was the
one who made his leader famous. The
Black Muslims did not attain national
attention until Malcolm began to preach,
and Malcolm was aware of this.
MALCOLM'S ACTIONS after his split,
with the Muslims were an indication
of his ambition. Many of those who split
with him thought the separatists should
take a more active political role. Their'
desires centered on unity with the Afri-
can national-liberation movements; the
Black Muslims remained principally a re-
ligion, with political separation only an
eventual goal. But Malcolm went fur-
ther than this. He was reportedly toy-
ing with the idea of running for Con-
gress against Harlem's Adam Clayton
Powell in 1966. Many observers familiar
with the situation gave him a good chance
of winniig.
H. NEIL BERKSON, Editor'
KENNETH WINTER EDWARD HERSTEIN
Managing Editor Editorial Director
ANN WiIRTZMAN .............Personnel Director
BILL BULLARD....................Sports Editor
MICRAtL SAATTINGER Associate Managing Editor
JOHN KENNY Assistant Managing Editor
DEBORAH BEATTIE . Associate Editorial Director
LOUISE LIND.......Assistant Editorial Director in
Charge of the Magaine
TOM ROWLAND ............Assciate Sports Editor
GARY wYNER. .......Associate Sports Editor
STEVEN HALLER.C.............ontributing Editor
MARY LOU BUTCHER .........Contributing Editor
JAMEt'ESN.........Chief Photographer
NGhT EDITORS: Lauren Bahr, David Bloc, John
Bryant, Jeffrey Goodman, Robert Rippler, Robert
Johnston, Michael Juliar, Laurence Kirshbaum,
Leonard Pratt.
Subscription rates: $4.50 semester by carrier ($5 by
mail); $8 yearly icy carrier ($9 by mail).
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor. Mich.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning.

Another factor behind the split in the
separatists was that many of them be-
lieved that corruption reigned at Mu-
hammad's headquarters in Chicago. Every
good Black Muslim contributes at least
one-tenth of his income to the organi-
zation, and almost all this money is
routed through Muhammad's Chicago
headquarters. There has been evidence
that funds are redistributed inequitably
from Chicago-and that large amounts
never leave there.
BUT EVERY ORGANIZATION is from
time to time troubled by men with
great personal ambition and corruption
at the top. There was something more
significant than this to Malcolm's split
with the Black Muslims. The split oc-
curred before the Muslims were able to
approach the size of an organization
capable of changing the course of Ameri-
can society. Their goals were so narrow
that they could not accommodate more
than a basic core of dissatisfied people
'before they completely lost consensus.
The Black Muslims hadl generated mass
appeal for only about five years before
they crumbled -their narrowt religious
aims were not in accordance with the
equally. narrow political aims of a large
segment of their followers.,
The fact that the Negro separatist
movement split at such an early stage
precludes the possibility it can become a
decisive factor in U.S. national life. For
example, the separatists would have to
be ten times as large as they are now-
and unified-to have a chance of serious-
ly affecting, by voting or not voting, a
national election.
WHAT DOES THE FUTURE hold for the
Negro separatists? Malcolm's assassi-
nation and the air of violence which now
seems to hang over the movement could
hurt the moveinent for a time. Many Ne-
groes are on the fringes of the separatists,
not, wanting to give up their Christian re-
ligious beliefs, yet accepting much of
what the separatists teach. Fear of in-
volvement in violence could scare off
many of those who were about to be re-
cruited by the separatists.
But those who think that the present
violent period spells the beginning of the
end for the separatists are far from right.
For the society which spawned the Black
Muslims is still here. As long as the U.S.
allows ten per cent of its willing and
able Negro men-and twenty per cent of
its Negro teenagers-to remain without
jobs, there will be great cause for that
despair which is the lifeblood of the sep-
aratists. As long as Negroes in both the
South and the North are blocked from
participating in our national life, there
will remain for many Negroes the temp-
tation to completely shun America and
everything it stand for. Louis Lomax has
phrased it well:
The Black Muslims will endure but
they will not prevail. Rather, they
will linger for years to come and be
a constant reminder of what this re-
public did to thousands who sought
its promise. They ..will make us
continually aware of what can hap-
pen if white men don't learn to love
before black men learn to hate.
THE DEATH of Malcolm X hasn't
changed this at all.
-ROBERT HIPPLER

T HE SPECULATION yesterday that dormitory rates
will rise for the second year in a row is not difficult
to substantiate.
In a document drawn up last October, Vice-President
for Business and Finance Wilbur K. Pierpont clearly in-
dicated that the present resources of the residence hall
system were barely enough to keep the system going, let
alone accommodate expansion. This second item is par-
ticularly important since the University plans to add
3600 units to the system in the next three years (Burs-
ley Hall, Cedar Bend I and II and residential college
housing), and current residence halls fees will shoulder;
some of the costs.
Pierpont's report concluded that "funds to supple-
ment the present resources of the system may come
from the following sources:
-"A gift program, such as that followed by the
private colleges;
-"A higher room and board charge per student
with controlled operating costs to produce larger rev-
enues for capital purposes;
-"The use of other operating funds to cover those
costs which are not covered by residence halls financial
operations."

Although the vice-president neatly sandwiched it,
the second alternative is the only one with real possi-
bilities. No gifts are in sight, and even in the unlikely
event that some eccentric donor should decide to counter
the current fad for research buildings and put his name
on a dormitory, the immediate need of the next few
years would not be met.
As for transferring other operating funds to the
residence halls, the University's budget situation in Lans-
ing is already so bleak that it will have a hard enough
time finding the money to accommodate expanding en-
rollment in the classrooms.
THE QUESTION becomes why the University is de-
laying action on this decision, and some rationale can be
provided. Governor .Romney, first through his incom-
prehensible budget recommendation and then through his
equally incomprehensible Flint position, has left, the
administration virtually reeling and unable to make
many basic decisions concerning both the short- and
long-run future of the University.
If Romney's proposed budget goes through the
Legislature, for instance, leaving the University $6 mil-,
lion short of its requested allocation, a tuition hike,
would be a strong probability. The administration would

then be most hesitant to also raise dorm fees in the sani,
year, especially after the awkward way in whichi it
raised fees last year.
The above is sheer hypothesis, however, and with
dorm residents being asked to tentatively commit them-
selves' for next year very shortly, Vice-President Cutler
might do well to issue a full statement of the adminis-
tration's position. By saying, as he did yesterday, that no
decision has been made, he is merely begging the question.
* * *
SPEAKING OF Governor Romney, his position on Flint
is no better now than it was last week. The governor
is determined to turn Flint into a great moral issue,
damning the universities (and this University) for
dreams of aggrandizement on the one hand, and holding
up the spectre of "centralized" control on the other.
The University is. colored as if it suddenly sprung
these plans on an unsuspecting governor, Legislature and
State Board of Education when, indeed, the plans, pgublic
for over a year, have been tacitly approved by tle key
Senate appropriatidns committee. The University is con-
demned for creating a branch when Flint has been part
of the institution (as a senior college) since 1956.
And 126 freshmen have already been admitted for
next year.

. 5.: '

OVERLOOKED OBLIGATIONS:

,.
v

The Intellectual Duties
Of the Universities

By CARROL CAGLE
Collegiate Press Service
THE CRISES facing the univer-
sities of today-the loss of the
student's identity, the trend. to-
ward multiversities, .the concen-.
tration on faculty research-have
tended to obscure a less dramatic
but deeply. significant issue which
has slowly been developing over
the years.
This development is the con-
fusion of duties between students
and the univers'ty,,particularly in
the liberal; arts
The duties of the student in
securing an education are fre-
quently overlooked, but it seems
to me that there has been a re-
versal in what is expected of the
university and in what is expected
of the student.
It used to be that a university's
role was to educate the student in
the traditions and culture of the
civilized world. The university was
then a guardian of the civiliza-
tion's; heritage; it strove to instill
in the student a precious sense of
history and a knowledge of the
great works of man.
* * *
THE STUDENT'S ROLE was
that of an active participant in
the process and he was expected
to concentrate on learning the
traditions. Taking care of the
technical details and the narrow,'
specialized knowledge needed to
secure employment was a personal
matter.
In a sense then, the university
was faithful to its elemental pur-
pose-serving as an island amid
the hustle-bustle of society where
the knowledge and wisdom of
centuries could endure.
The roles are now being reversed.

Look at the university of today.
Its class schedules are crammed
full of courseswhere students
learn how to administer a per-
sonnel program, or how to grow
hybrid corn, or how to under-
stand the Russians, or how to
program a computer. But its stu-
dents are not being taught, as they
should be, the fundamental dis-
ciplines.
HEREIN lies the reversal of
functions. It is now up to the
student to read the great books,
to become acquainted with the
arts, and to steep himself in the
culture of Western civilization.
The university has abrogated its
traditional responsibility of acting
as guardian of the best of our
culture, and has become a training
ground for technicians, adminis-
trators, and experts of all types.
The fundamental shift in the
duty of the student and the duty
of the university is .disturbing.
Universities havebeen haphazard-
ly adding classes and departments
,which are of fleeting interest to
someone and which undoubtedly
perform some function. The stu-
dent is left to flounder, picking up
in a piecemeal fashion the im-
portant knowledge of our culture.
UNLESS the university realizes
its duty as one of the most, im-
portant institutions in our society
-duties demanding intellectual
discipline - then someday there
may be no common culture or
common purpose. The wisdom of
the centuries and the roots of the
past are especially needed in a
society growing more rootless and
anxious every day. Introspection
is long overdue.

t

7hINK-ONQE $15WAS NOI)-IINGUT RAWI

"'7I d o sV -l'H
W6p'~ fSiJ'

THE GOVERNOR AND THE UNIVERSITY, PART I:
Flint Is A Question of Issues,, Not Personalities

(First of a two-part series)
By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
WITH ITS usual zest for
,struggles of personalities, the
state's newspapers have focused
their most blaring headlines and
glaring editorials on the current
feud between Gov. George Rom-
ney and University President Har-
lan Hatcher.
The issue which is ostensibly di-
viding these titans is whether the
University should add a freshman
class to its two-year senior college
at Flint next fall. But 'the state's
journalists, unaccustomed as they
are to tracing educational prob-
lems in an historical context, have

blown the Flint question out of
perspective.
What they are obscuring is the
fact that the Flint controversy
represents much more than a
flareup of personalities-it is a
deeper conflagration fueled by is-
sues which have been building in
Michigan for the past few years.
* * *
EVENTS OF recent days sug-
gest that the State Board of Edu-
cation, the Legislature and other
educators all intend to enter the
fray over Flint. And when the
flames recede, not only the gov-
ernor and the president will have
been burnt by the glare of public

I

,,, .

FEIFFER

opinion. A whole pattern of de-
velopment for higher education
will have been carved.
What then are the issues which
have led to the recent confla-
gration? What has prompted a
prudent governor-and old friend
of the University-to launch a,
personal assault on the institu-
tion's president? And what is be-
hind the president's insistent sup-
port of the Flint expansion plans
despite a growing wave of opposi-
tion throughout the state?
To get at these questions as well
as the reasons behind the present
crisis, it is necessary to isolate
three historical trends of higher
education in Michigan.
* AUTONOMY. No trend has
been more pronounced in Michi-,
gan history than the success pub-
lic higher institutions have en-_
joyed by operating independently
of public control.
Just one year after the Uni-
versity's founding in 1818, Su-
preme Court Justice John Mar-
shall handed down a decision
about another school which was
to shape the future course of
higher education in many ways.
The decision was a judgment
on the attempt of New Hampshire
to assume control of Dartmouth
College. In rebuffing the state's
effort to encroach upon a private
college, Marshall reaffirmed the
rights of autonomy granted to
corporate educational institutions.
These same rights would later
apply to public institutions.
* * *
IN 1821, the University was re-
organized as a body corporate, and
emnowered to establish other

were made body corporates and
hence given full reign to super-
vise and financially manage their
institutions.
To be sure, the institutions must
go hat in hand to solicit an ar-
nual appropriation from the Legis-
lature. But even this process does
not strip them of internal control.
A recent attorney general's ruling
prohibited state officials from tak-
ing part in such internal opera-
tions as awarding contracts for
buildings.
0 COORDINATION. G i v e n
their corporate status, the 10
state-supported s c h o o is h a v e
shown themselves splendid exhi-
bitors of entrepreneurship. Unfor-
tunately, the institutional leaders,
for all their noble intellectual
aims, are like corporation men en-
gaged in the business of education.
To maintain the best corporations,
they must compete for public and
private funds, for - talented stu-
dents, for untapped lands and for
undeveloped areas of study. Often
their efforts and goals overlap.
When Michigan State University
wants a medical school, Wayne
State and the University holler
"Support ours first!" When the
University wants to expand in
Flint, voices from other schools
likewise ring out in protest.
When conflicts avise, the talk
of coordination becomes louder.
The schools have tried grouping
voluntarily in advisory associa-
tions. The Michigan Council of
State College Presidents was form-
ed in 1847 as a forum for hashing
out common problems. The Co-
rdinating Couicil for Public High-
er, Education a more hroadlv-

school plans, the East Lansing
school was convinced only to take
its expansion plans underground.
When the University was recently
advised to curtail its plans for
Flint, officials took the advice
like a yellow light-not a red.
* AUTHORITY. It is a difficult
task to try to reconcile the con-
flicting traditions of autonomy
and coordination. The task be-
comes explosive when the recon-
ciliation is put into writing.
But that's what happened when
a group of interested citizens
spearheaded the movement to re-
write the state's constitution-a
document which had not been
rewritten since 1908.
One target of revision was the
education article. The framers
turned all 10 school boards of
directors into powerful controllers
of body corporates. But at the
same time, they superimposed a
state board of education-ambig-
uously defined - whose charge
would be- to serve as the "general
planning and coordinating body
for all public education, including
higher education, and . . . (to)
advise the Legislature as to the
financial requirements in connec-
tion therewith."

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