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February 20, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-20

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SATURDAY,, 20 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, 20 FEBUTJ~UY 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

RacialViolence Continues)

Tshombe 'PENTAGON SPECULATION:
Threatens See No Termination of Draft

In Alabama, New

York

By The Associated Press
MARION, Ala.-Racial violence
continued to erupt in Marion and
Brooklyn, N.Y., yesterday as Ne-
groes protested racial discrimina-
tion in voter registration and in
public schools.
Negroes in Marion, stunned by
violence which left several among
them badly hurt, obeyed a police
,hief's order yesterday and abrupt-
ly postponed a planned civil rights
' demonstration.
A Negro leader, Albert Turner,
said the postponement was by no
means considered a letup in dem-
onstrations in this west central
Alabama farm community of
about 4000.
"We think that yesterday's
turnout, which was almost 100
per cent adult in its makeup, is
a major victory for the civil rights
movement in Marion," Turner
said.

three newsmen were beaten and
numerous Negro demonstrators
hurt in a fight which broke out
Thursday night during a civil
rights march.
The clash occurred between
about 400 Negroes and about 100
!helmeted state troopers armed
with clubs.
Second Center
Marion, 30 miles west of Sel-
ma, has been a second center of
Negro voter registration demon-
strations in this farming area of
Alabama. The drive in Selma was
started by Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. and spread to Marion.
King sent Atty. Gen. Nicholas
Katzenbach a telegram asking for
federal protection of citizens in
Marion.
In Washington, the Justice De-
partment made public a reply in
which Katzenbach said the FBI
was investigating the events in
Marion and that the Justice De-

clothes, yesterday smothered a
demonstration by 200 teen-aged
Negro school boycotters, after two
days of street riots in Brooklyn.
Brought from all over the city,
the 400 policemen outnumbered
the youngsters two to one.
Two mounted policemen rode
their horses onto the sidewalk
and split up the mob. Other po-
lice moved in quickly and arrest-
ed 13 adults and two school chil-
dren. That broke the back of the
demonstration and it dissolved
after about 45 minutes.
55 Arrested
The arrests brought to 55 the
number seized in the area in the
past three days-27 adult leaders
of the partial school boycott and
28 youngsters.
The leader of the boycott, the
Rev. Milton A. Galamison, head of
a citywide committee for desegre-
gated schools, said he is seeking
the removal- of School Superin-
tendent Calvin Gross and the en-
tire Board of Education. In a wire
to State Commissioner of Edu-
cation James E. Allen, Jr., Galai-
mison said:
"The response of the Board of
Education to our efforts to peace-
fully protest inferior education has
been Mississippian. Chaperones of
the children have been deliberate-
ly arrested to provoke chaos and
besmirch legitimate efforts to se-
cure rights. We call for the dis-
missal of Calvin Gross and the
Board of Education."

Ugandans
LEOPOLDVILLE (W) - Premier
Moise Tshombe handed Uganda
an ultimatum yesterday - get
Ugandan troops off Congolese soil
in 24 hours or the Congo "will be
obliged to take the necessary
measures."
Tshombe charged that Ugandan
and Congolse rebels troops had
seized two towns, Mahagi, a Con-
golese outpost five miles inside
the Congo north of Lake Albert
and Kasindi, farther south near
Lake Edward.

300 People partment's policy a
The group, which was made up to investigate and r
of about 300 persons, marched in ed violations of fed
silence from its meeting place-a The telegram m
church adjacent to the courthouse of King's request f
square in downtown Marion-and tection. The Justi
was stopped immediately by Po- has consistently i
lice Chief T. O. Harris. neither its lawyers
The chief told them that if have the legal au
they proceeded to march they tend the kind of
would be arrested on charges of tendeted o
unlawful assembly. The Negroes requested.
200 Arre
went back to the church and spent Meanwhile in Ne
about an hour mapping strategy. task force f police
Turner said that another mass horseback, in unifoi
meeting was planned for last night
but that no march was planned..
"We decided against any more S ena e
night time marches after last
night," he said. "It's just too easy
to get jerked behind the bushes t4
and beaten when it's dark, as lastC on G in
night showed."
Many Hurt WASHINGTON 0
One Negro was critically shot, ASHINGTON
____________ ___approved by a 72-0
a constitutional a
M signed to assure cc

lways has been
prosecute alleg-
eral law.
ade no mention
or federal pro-
ce Department
naintained that
nor FBI agents
thority to ex-
protection King
ested
w York, a heavy
,a foot and on
rm and in plain

WASHINGTON (P) - BettingI
around the Pentagon is that thet
draft will be around for a long
t~me to come.
Speculation that the Selective
Service Act might be terminatedI
has produced a worrisome impact1
on the number of young men vol-
unteering for military service,1
some defense officials said yes-
terday.
In saying an end of the draft
.during the near future is any-1
thing but a certainty, they point-
ed to Secretary of Defense Robert
S. McNamara's discussion of thet
current study of the draft, noting,
especially the time frame he used.
Draft Study
McNamara's report to he Houset
Armed Services Committee Thurs-
day said the study includes the
possibility of meeting military re-
quirements on an entirely volun-
tary basis "sometime in the nextt
decade." The current Selective
Service Act doesn't come up for
renewal by Congress until 1967.
The special group making the
study is scheduled to submit itsf
findings next April. While no ore-f
liminary reports by the group have1
been made public, there is belief
in many Pentagon quarters that
the findings will recommend
against abandonment of the draftj
system in the years immediately
ahead.
Possibility of Changes
However, as McNamara's tes-
timony indicates, there may be
changes in the process by which1
men are selected. This arises out
of the fact that while manpower
requirements are remaining at a1
general level, the pool of age-
eligible men is growing swiftly
with the population increase creat-
ing a surplus.j
The problem the military estab-
lishment is now facing is that-
many young men interpret some
statements, actions and rumors
about the draft to mean that it
will be ended soon. Therefore, the
motivation forvolunteering in one
of the other services before a man
is drafted into the Army dimin-
ishes.

Statistics available at the Pen-
tagon show this trend.
Fewer Volunteers
For all services, the number of
volunteers is lower by as much as
10 to 15 per cent under cor-
responding months last year.
The drop-off in volunteers has
been progressing in each service
except the Marine Corps.
The Air Force received 9,756
volunteers in September, but by
December it was down to 3,085. It
climbed again, normally, in the
post-holiday month of January,
then began to drop off once more
at the outset of this month.
The Army-the only service to
use the draft in recent years-had
8,312 in October, 5,847 in Decem-
ber.
Campaign Speeches
September and October were
significant in this trend when dis-
cussion of the possibility of ending
the draft entered campaign
speeches.
In early September, Republican
nominee Barry Goldwater promis-
ed that Republicans would "end
the draft altogether as soon as
possible."
Later, President Lyndon B.
Johnson, in an impromptu news
conference, said a quick end of
the draft might cost several bil-
lion dollars, but he did not then
rule out the possibility that it
might be halted in 1965.
The possibility that some kind
of change in the draft law might
be forthcoming had been posed
even earlier, in April, when John-
son announced the beginning of
the year-long draft study.
Quotas Increase
The impact 'of the diminishing
number of volunteers is being re-
flected in sharp upward stages in
draft quotas.
Tee Wins State
Auditor's Post
LANSING (A)-Detroit account-
ant Albert Lee has only to come
to the state capitol and take his
oath of office to become Michi-
gan's first legislative auditor.
Democrats in the House and
Senate gave hin the job Thurs-
day-despite Republican attempts
to get some voice in the choice for
the office. He will take an eight-
year post with an annual salary
of $22,500.
The House passed a resolutioi,
naming Lee on a 76-5 vote.
The Senate fought a Republi-
can amendment which would havE
created a five-member committee
-including all the losing candi-
dates-to advise the Legislature
on duties and functions of the
new position.
The election carried there with
24 yes votes.

SECRETARY McNAMARA
Earlier this week, the Defense
Department announced it had re-
quested from the Selective Service
a quota of 13,700 men, all for the
Army, for next April. And an ini-
tial call for 3,900 men in March
was revised upward a few weeks
later to a new quota of 7,900.
These were in sharp contrast
with the comparatively small
quotas last year and with the
modest 5,400 asked in December
and the still smaller 3,000 for
February.

PREMIER TSHOMBE

Passes Executive
uity Amendment
P)-The Senate.
vote last night
mendment de- -.
ntinuity in ex-
P i t l

Uganda's charges that Congo-
lese warplanes bombed two Ugan-
dan villages last week were' char-
acterized by Tshombe as a pre-
text to raid the Congo. He said
Premier Milton Obote of Uganda
had been "scene setting" when he
made the accusation, adding:
"Our inquiry shows that no Con-
golese aircraft bombed Uganda."
As proof that Uganda was tak-
ing part in the invasion in the
northeast Congo, Tshombe said
several Ugandan prisoners had
been taken.

H.I.S
SLACKS
at
KLINES
306 S. Main

C.

Lose Position
LANSING (P)-Four Democratic
legislators, three of them Ne-
groes, say they are preparing a
bill that would cost Orvill L.
Hubbard his Job as mayor of
Dearborn. The bill, if passed,
would disqualify a person from
holding office in Michigan for 10
years after being convicted of
violating the United States Civil
Rights Acts of 1870 or 1964.
Hubbard has been indicted
along with two of his police of-
ficials for violating and conspir-
Ing to violate the 1870 act. The
three are charged with failing to
take steps to stop a mob that
rioted on Labor Day, 1963, when
it mistakenly assumed a Negro
was moving into a Dearborn home.
Hubbard and the two police
officials will be tried together
before Federal Judge Wade H.
McCree, Jr. beginning March 1.

ecutive leadersnip in case a res-
ident becomes incapacitated or
otherwise is unable to perform his
duties.
The approval came after the
Senate had previously rejected a
substitute motion sponsored by
Republican Leader Everett M.
Dirksen of Illinois.
The approved amendment must
now go to the House for further
action. If passed, the following
two-part amendment will become
part of the Constitution.
The first part of the amend-
ment provides that whenever there
is a vacancy in the office of vice-
president, the President shall
nominate a successor who would
take office when confirmed by ?
majority vote of both houses of
Congress.
Second Part
The second part provides that
whenever the President declares
in writing to the president of the
Senate and the speaker of the
House that he is unable to dis-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
Nestor Edgardo Farias, Jose Alber-
to Gia, Norberto Marcelino Velasco,
,hemical engineering students, Uni-
versity of the Litoral, Santa Fe, Ar-
gentina (accompanied by John J. Cen-
doya), Feb. 17-20.
Mrs. Vera Davidenko, scientific work-
er, Ukranian Scintific Research Insti-
tute of Pedagogy, Kiex, Ukraine, Feb.
21-23.
V. E. D'Rozario, T. G. Satyanaray-f
an, R. C. Sharma, high school prin-
cipals, India, Feb 21-24.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Univ. of Southern Calif., Los Angeles
-Announces 2 yr. Specialist-Teacher
Program leading to Calif. certif. & MA
for secondary teaching. Work-study
plan for grads, major in common high
school courses, esp. Math, Engl., Sci.
& Span. Financial aid available plus
salary. Details at-Bureau of Appoint-
mnents.
Univ. of Denver (Research Inst.),
Colo. - Grad Research Appointments
leading to MA & PhD. Study & res. for
grads in engrg., math or physical sci.
9 & 12 month appointments cover sal-
ary & tuition and are renewable. Ap-
plication deadline April 1.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Ott Chemical Co., Muskegon, Mich.G
-Chem. Engr. Man for immed. opening.
3-6 yrs. exper. for mfr. of organic &
pharma. chemicals. Age late 20's.
Mgntt. Consultants, N.Y.C.-Personnel
Manager for multi-plant corp. Grad
with MBA pref. Proven ability in per-
sonnel mgmt.
Arizona Civil Service, Phoenix -
Public Health Engrs. Grad with degree'
in sanitary, public health, indus. hy-
giene. civil. mech. or chem. engrg.
plus 1 yr. grad study or equiv. exper.
in related field.
Kyova Pipe Co., fronton, Ohio-Re-
giona) Sales Engr. Male, bkgd. in civil
or sanitary engrg. Located in Chicago
with extensive Midwest travel. Sales
exper. Age 22-28.
State of Michigan-Various openings
include: 1. Mech. Engr. BSME, 4 yrs.
exper. pref. 2. Attorney, member Mich.
State Bar or June grad anticipating
admission. 3. Workmen's Compensa-
tion Hearings Referee. Member of
Mich. State Bar plus 5 yrs. exper.
North American Aviation, Inc., Co-
lumbus, Ohio-Positions in Missile Dev
Degree in E, AE, ME, Math or Physics
plus exper. in missile systems analysis
& des.
I Study in

For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Camp Tanalo, Pa.-Coed. Will inter-
view from 10:30-12 & 1-5, Wed., Feb.
24. Counselors, skills in riflery, drama
& music, waterfront, dancing, athletics
& campcraft.
Sunnybrook Acres, N.Y.-Resort. Po-
sitions as waiter-entertainers, inboard
motor boat operator and water-ski in-
structor. Good pay.
The following places have summer
openings: Hamilton Stores, Yellowstone
Park; Cedar Point Funland, Sandusky.
Ohio; Good Hunfor, Detroit, Chicago,
N.Y., Baltimore, Wash., D.C.; New Yorl
World's Fair Brass Rail. All available
after April 27.
Details and information at Summer
Placement, 212 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-M West
Engrg.
FEB. 25-
Amphenol-Borg Electronics Corp.,
Throughout U.S.-All Degrees: EE &
Physics. BS-MS: IE. BS: E Math, EM,
E Physics, Mat'ls., ME & Scl. Engrg.
Dev., Des., Prod. & Sales.
Bausch & Lomb, Inc., Rochester, N.Y.
-BS-MS: BEE, EM, IE, ME. BS: E
Math, E Physics. MS: Instru. Can con-
sider non-citizens if becoming U.S.
citizen & have permanent visa. R. &
D., Des. & Prod.
Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co.,
Cleveland, Ohio-BS-MS: EE. BS: MI.
R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
Lear Siegler, Inc., Instrument Div.,
Grand Rapids, Mich.-All Degrees: EE.
MS-PhD: Instru. & ME. Prof.: Ap-
plied Mech. MS: EM. BS: E Physics.
R. & D. & Des.
Parker-Hannifin Corp., Des Plaines,
Ill. & Cleveland, Ohio-$S: IE & Me-
teor. & Ocean. April & June grads.
Des., Prod. & Sales.
U.S. Patent Office, Wash., D.C. -
BS-MS: AE & Astro., ChE, CE, EE,
EM, IE, ME, Met. BS: E Physics &
Sci Egrg. MS: Nuclear. Patent Exam-
ining.
FEB. 25-26-
Martin Co., Baltimore, Md. - All
Degrees: AE & Astro., BE, MB. MS-
PhD: Commun. Sc., Nuclear & Physics.
PhD: Psych & CE. BS: Sci. Engrg. R. &
D., Des. & Test.
Union Carbide Corp., Linde Div,-BS-
MS: ChE, CE, EE, EM. ME & Met. BS:
E Physics. R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.

SENATOR DIRKSEN
charge the powers and duties of'
his office, they are to be dis-
charged by the vice-president as
acting President.
The vice-president also would
take over as acting President if he
and a majority of the cabinet gave
similar notification that the Pres-
ident was unable to carry out his
duties. This is to take care of
cases in-which a President would
not or could not declare his in-
ability.
The President would resume the
powers and duties of his office
whenever he transmitted a writ-
ten declaration to the congres-
sional officials that his inability
no longer existed, unless this were
challenged by the vice-president
with the concurrence of a ma-
jority of the cabinet.
Solves Dispute
If such a dispute should arise,
the proposed amendment provides
that Congress shall immediately
proceed to decide the issue. If the
Senate and the House each deter-
mined by a two-thirds vote that
the presidential inability had not
ended, the vice-president would
continue as acting President. Oth-
erwise, the President would re-
gain his powers.
Dirksen's proposal, backed by
the administration, had been ap-
proved in principle by the Sen-
ate last year but was not acted
upon by the House. The proposal
had two parts.
Nominates Successor
One provides that in case there
is a vice-presidential vacancy--as
has happened 16 times-the Presi-
dent shall nominate a successor
subject to confirmation by a ma-
jority vote of both houses of
Congress.
The second part sets forth the
procedures by which the vice-pres-
ident may take over as acting
President in case the President
becomes incapacitated or other-
wise is unable to discharge his
powers and duties.
Two-Thirds Vote
If a dispute should arise over
the President's inability, the issue
would be determined by a two-
thirds majority of both the Sen-
ate and the House.
Dirksen argued that such de-
tails need not and should not be
written into the Constitution, be-
cause they might prove unwork-
able in practice.

World NewsRounidup
By The Associated Press
SEOUL-About 100 opposition politicians, led by former Presi-
dent Yun Po-sun, nearly half of them members of the National
Assembly, clashed twice with riot police yesterday after trying to
stage anti-Japanese rallies. Several were injured, one seriously.
*~ * * * -
VATICAN CITY-Archbishop Josef Beran of Prague, imprisoned
by the Communists and once feared dead by Vatican officials, came
to Rome yesterday to become a '-___
Cardinal of the Roman Catholic
Church. l Votino Age
* *
MOSCOW - The Soviet Unione
yesterday condemned "aggressive
actions" by United States planes
attacking infiltration routes in Special To The Daily
Communist-held regions of Laos. LANSING - A resolution pro-
It said the raids could lead "to posing to lower the voting age
serious consequences." from 21 to 18 in Michigan has
MIANI BEACH-South Atlantic been sent to the Senate Judiciary
Longshoremen and shippers broke Committee for consideration.
off negotiations yesterday, and The issue of lowering the vot-
the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades ing age has been raised - and
Department threatened a new killed-many times, but is suppos-
Miami to Texas dock shutdown ed to have a much better chance
"if the government persists in of passage this year because of
putting pressure" on the long- the strong support given to it by
shoremen. Gov. George Romney.
** *
ROME-Directors of the Chris- Though there is legislative sup-
tian Democrat Party wound up a port for the proposal-such as
three-day meeting yesterday by that of Sen. Garry Brown (R-
approving a contemplated shake- Schoolcraft), who says that there
up of Premier Aldo Moro's center- is "nothing sacrosanct" about the
left coalition government. 21 year age limit presently in
Moro is expected to meet today force, there is also opposition to
with leaders of the four coalition the idea of lowering the age limit
parties: the Christian Democrats, to 18.
Democratic Socialists, Socialists Rep. Robert Traxler (R-Grosse
and Republicans. Pointe) maintains that "18-year-
CAIRO-President Gamal Ab- olds haven't had much work ex-
del Nasser's chief spokesman yes- perience, and this should be a ma-
terday urged a softer line toward jor prerequisite for voting," Trax-
West Germany, apparently feel- ler suggested lowering the voting
ing a break would hurt Cairo age to "perhaps 19 or 20."
worse than Bonn.
MIAMI-A commando, Nilo Luis
Alonso, captured by Fidel Castro DIXIELAND
forces two weeks ago said on a
Havana radio-television network OLD H EI DELB ERG
last night that he and a fellow (r'
captive were to have been the
vanguard for establishment of an
anti-Castro beachhead.
1 I
FREE DELIVEERY:
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT:
Phone 761-0001
* O F on large;
50c OFF one item pizza'
Coupon Good Monday thru Thursday
w................w............a..................wI

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"Your Hair Problems
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Visit
The Dascola Barbers
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or
The U of M Barbers
(North U. near Kresge's)

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how to keep things that way
The reason is the Koratron
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at
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new slacks
with the
"in-crease."
They increase
your wearing
pleasure because

Uo f M Faculty, Staff & Student
GROUP FLIGHTS TO EUROPE
Round Trip Jets (not charter) New York-London
June 1st Flight (11 week stay) $333.20
July 14th Flight (5 week stay) $341.40
Both flights return Aug. 17th and include
1/2 day in Bermuda.
Information from Les Thurston, 663-5718

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