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February 20, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, 20 FEBRUARY 196

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChIGAN HAhN

S.a i+~.ATURDAiy . 24a FERRITAR i 1aV"

P.-,

COLLECTION GROWS STEADILY:
Campus Art Bedecks Union

Discuss Difficulties of
'New Residential College

13

By ALICE BLOCH
There's more in the Union than
billiard tables, exam-week movies
and cokes. In the first-floor West
Concourse a small collection of
paintings of campus scenes by
Michigan artists has been growing
slowly but surely.
In 1956 Franklin Kuenzel, gen-
eral manager of the Union, start-
ed the collection to encourage art
work on campus, for the newly re-
modeled concourse.
A Union committee suggested
the collection be exclusively cam-
pus scenes by Michigan artists.
They recommended having 12
paintings which could also be used
to produce a calendar of Univer-
sity scenes.
First Three
The first three paintings were
"In the Arboretum" by Constance
Richardson (wife of the director
of the Detroit Art Institute),
"Palmer Field" by Hughie Lee-
Smith, and "Scene on the Dia-
gonal" by Prof. Donald B. Gooch
of the architecture and design
college.
The artists chose their works
from a list of suggested topics. "It
seemed to me that the focal point
of the campus was in front of the
General Library, so I, wanted to
make that spot the focal point of
my painting," Gooch said.
He.started his painting during

the 1956 summer session, using
photographs and recollections as
references and choosing a typical
mid-summer scene.
Gooch also included many for-
eign students in the scene to give
his impression of the cosmopolitan
nature of the campus. "The Uni-
versity is one of the only places
outside New York with so many
different costumes constantly in
view," he explained.
The next painting added to the
collection was "End of the Day"
by Prof. Guy Palazzola of the
architecture and design college.
This painting portrays the tearing
down of the old Romance Lan-
guages Building, which to Palaz-
zola seemed to be a symbol of
"the end of an age-one of the
last remnants to be put aside for
new things."
Studied Invoices
Palazzola prepared for the paint-
ing by studying invoices, bills and
drawings at Rackham Hall and
working with the demolition
squad. In the actual painting I
concentrated on conveying the
feeling of desolation that accom-
panies the symbolic end of an age,
he said.
"State Street," by Prof. Fride
Vidar of the architecture and de-
sign college, was the fifth work
added. "Somehow old State $t.,
with its bicycles and arcade, in-

terested me," he said. "I liked this (Continued from Page 1) back here" to the main campus
busy part of the campus. Behind faculty members are intimately "for their literary school courses?
the store signs, in the architecture, involved with graduate connec- They will be sent to the residen-
something representing a culture ions and fields of specialized re- tial college and what we're going
exists, something that does not die searchhe saidar

with the killing in the world. Two connected problems Dorrr
Art in the Union brought out were whether the

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"The main thing, though, is
that I think it's a wonderful idea
to have art in the Union. There
are lots of empty walls and lots
of young painters here, and the
Union should continue adding to
this collection," Fride commented.
The last two paintings added
were "The President's Home" by
Helene Schaefer, and an untitled
pointing of the old observatory by
Prof. Aarre K. Lahti of the archi-
tecture and desine college.
Lahti's painting was contributed
to the Union by the family of the
late M. K. Jessup of the astronomy
department. Jessup's family want-
ed a painting of the old astronomy
building, but Lahti said, "if I
just painted the building by it-
self, I would be implying that this
is the state of astronomy today.
The collection continues to grow.
A painting of a football game by
Lee Forrest will probably be fin-
ished by next year.
"Science is most important for
survival, but if your are going to
survive, do it with grace or life is
not worth living. Student organi-
zations should realize that this
Union collection is a good begin-
ning and that it shouldn't be the m
end," Vidar said.
Dems Hold Off
Bond Proposal
From Ballot
A Huron Parkway bond issue'
will not appear on the April 5 city
election ballot.
The City Council needed six
votes for approval. The motion to
place the question on the ballot
was defeated in a party-line vote,
five to four.
Democrats on the council op-,
posed the motion while the four
Republicans present favored plac-
ing the issue before the electorate
for the second time. The proposal
was narrowly defeated last Novem-1
ber when it received 58 per cent
of a required 60 per cent for
passage.
Dems Seek Delay
Rather than having a spring I
bond issue election, Democrats
favored having a bond election
later in the year. They said they.
would like to review the total
capital improvement needs of the
city before placing any single bond
issue on the ballot.
An alternative to building the
parkway by general obligation
bonds is building it using revenue
bonds which will not require a
public vote.
City Administrator Guy C. Lar-
com, Jr., said he opposed this
method because funds used to payI
off the revenue bonds would have
to be replenished from the gen-
eral fund.
With or Without
Larcom told the council that it
must realize that the "parkway
will go ahead one way or an-
other," since it is the top priority
item before the council.
Larcom also said he would like
the council to reach some con-
sensus on the parkway issue. He
explained that if the issue was
placed on the ballot by a split
vote, its chances for passage would
be endangered.

residential college might not be
attractive to outside teachers who
would wish to be connected with
an established, well-recognized de-
partment, yet not fit in with the
parent department; and whether
it might not be hard to find fac-
ulty "willing to teach rather con-
tinually at the underclass level."
A fourth problem Door was con-
cerned with was that of service
teaching.
Service teaching comprises all
the teaching, for example, that the
literary college does for students
enrolled in the nursing school, the
architecture and design school and
other schools at the University.
Dorr questioned whether the
burden of service teaching should
not be spread "over all units of
the University doing that kind of
instruction."
Pressures
The fifth point Dorr made was
concerned with the "withdrawal.
from the pressures of size and
necessity" afforded by the residen-
tial college. He said he is "not
convinced we will ever be in a
position to withdraw from obliga-
tions . . . Withdrawal to a small
niche from the pressures of so-
ciety is hopeless."
"To the contrary," he said,
"there is an advantage of grow-
ing up out of the high school

-second class."
Concluding the interview, Fel-
heim said, "We're the University
of Michigan. Why set up a little
Oberlin? If people want to go to
Oberlin, let them go. I'm not
against Oberlin. I have great re-
spect for Oberlin."
Possibly some indication of the
sentiments on the residential col-
lege among all the members of the
faculty, besides those particular-
ly questioned, may be seen in the
results of a recent poll the resi-
dential college faculty planning
committee took of the whole fac-
ulty of the literary college.
Faculty Response
Approximately 42 per cent of
the faculty responded-a good re-
sult, according to Associate Dean
Burton D. Thuma, director of the
residential college.
Of the 354 faculty members who
responded, 52 were "very interest-
ed" in teaching in the residen-
tial college; 67 were "somewhat"
interested; 56 were unsure; 103
thought "probably not," and 64
checked a "definitely not" blank.
The polling questionnaire did
state that "it is assumed that all
residential college staff will be
able to continue their supervision
of graduate students on the main
campus."
The large majority of polled
teachers indicated that they would
prefer an appointment split be-

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily Assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Day Calendar
Swimming-U-M vs. Ohio State: Ath-
letic Bldg., 2:30 p.m.
Gymnastics-U-M vs. Iowa: Yost Field
House, 3 p.m.
School of Music Faculty Recital -
Marfilyn Mason, organist: Organ Stu-
dio 2110, School of Music (courtesy
tickets required), 4:30 and 7 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin's "The
Great Dictator": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9 p.m.
Chamber Music Festival Concert -j
Budapest String Quartet: Rackham
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examina tion for Rainer Ort-
win Schulte, Comparative Literature;
thesis: "Henry James and Marcel
Proust: A Study in Sensibility." Sat.,
Feb. 20, 848 E. University, 9:30 a.m.
Chairman, Austin Warren.
Michigan Marching Band: The Mich-
igan Marching Band will perform at
the Ohio State basketball game this
Saturday afternoon. All those partici-
pating are asked to be at the Field
House by 1:15 p.m. Dress in suits, ties,
and dark shoes. Enter the building
through the north end doors to re-
ceive admission tickets.
Gene ral Notices

=n overall average of 3.0 or better
are eligible to compete. Financial aid
is a factor in making these awards.
Applications for the Following Schol-
arships are available in office of
al umnae secretary, Alumni Memorial
Bali; they must be returned by Feb. 12,!
1965; recipients will be announced at
League Recognition Night, March 1,
1965.
The Lucile B. Conger Scholarship is
offered to in-state, undergraduate wom-
en on the basis of academic perform-
ance, contribution to University life
and financial need; the stipend is
variable.
The Margaret L. Waterman Scholar-
ship is offered to undergraduate wom-
en on the basis of academic perform-
ance, contribution to University life,
and financial need; the stipend is var-
iable.
The Luan Peckinpaugh Scholarship is
offered to out-of-state undergraduate
women who have successfully completed
their freshman year and have a dem-
onstrated financial need' the stipend
is variable.
The Mary Louise Hinsdale Scholar-
ship, amounting to approximately $180
(interest on the endowment fund) is
available to undergraduate single wom-
en who are wholly or partially self-
supporting and who do not live in
University residence halls or sorority
houses. Girls withnbetter than aver-
age scholarship and need will be
considered.
The Laurel Harper Seeley Scholarship
is open to both graduate and under-
graduate women. The award is made
on basis of scholarship, contribution
to University life and financial need,
the stipend is variable.
The Lucy E. Elliott Fellowship is
open to women graduates of any
accredited college or university. It may
be used by a University of Michigan

*

G MICHIGRM

DIAL 5-6290

nate Scholarships will be available at
the Scholarship Office, 2011 SAB, be-
ginning Mon., Jan. 11. Applications
must be completed by March 1. Un-
dergraduate students who hare com-
pleted one or more full semesters with

choice of living units
UDIV(RSIIY TOWERS
: Now renting for Aug. '65
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE: 761-2680

graduate at any college or university,
but a graduate of any other univer-
sity will be required to study on the
Michigan campus. Academic achieve-
ment, creativity and leadership will be
considered in granting the award. The
stipend is $1,100.
The Alice Crocker Lloyd Fellowship is
open to women graduates of any ac-
credited college or university. It may
be used by a University of Michigan
graduate at any college or university
but a graduate of any other school will
be required to study on the Michi-
gan campus. Academic achievement,
personality and leadership will be con-
sidered in granting the award. The
stipend is $1,100.
The Lucy Cooley Houston Scholar-
ships: Offered' by the Alumnae Club of
Jackson, are available to students who
will be enrolled in fall, 1965. Grants
are based on scholarship and need
and vary in amount; they are avail-
able to students now enrolled and those
entering for the first time. Application
blanks are available from Mrs. William
Nelson, 1026 S. Thompson,dJackson,
Mich. They must be completed and re-
turned by April 1. Applicants must be
from the Jackson area.
May Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
All requirements for the teacher's cer-
tificate must be completed bydMarch
22. These requirements include the
teacher's oath, the health statement,
the Bureau of Appointments material,
and the social security number. The
oath should be taken as soon as possi-
ble in Room 1203 University School,
The office is open from 8:30 to 12
and 1 to 4:30.
Foreign vsitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148,
(Continued on Page 3)

L

F,

4

,I
it

f

functio n, in being a member of tween the main campus or gradu- Admissions Office Change: Effective
large group." The size of the Uni-I ate courses and the residential Mon., Feb. 22, the Admissions Office
versity is "an advantage fo the college toyfull time duty or ro- of the Horace H. Rackham School of
elitisanavnaefrtheis tating duty. Graduate Studies Will be located in
type of student attracted to this Room 102 of the Rackham Bldg. The
sort of thing. Larger social groups telephone number for all calls regard-
involve one with greater oppor- ;ing admission is 764-65s2.
tunity." A crossjFinal Payment of Winter Term Fees
Dorr added that his objections is due and payable on or before Feb.
can possibly be refuted by ex- 26, 1965.
pe'eneintereienilcolge 1If fees are not paid b this date:
perience in the residential college- i1. A $10 delinquent penalty will be
A second perhaps representative charged.
questioner of the residential col- j 2 A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until
lege is Prof. Marvin Felheim of SATURDAY, FEB. 20 payment isreceived and "Hold Credit"
the English department. is cancelled:
Educational' Experiments 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. - Marilyn 1) Grades will not be mailed.
Although Felheim stressed his Mason, Organist will perform a 2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
support for educational experi- recital at Studio 2110. f 3) You may not register for future
supprt or ductionl eper- ;semesters.
mentation, in a recent interview, 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild 4) A Senior may not graduate with
he mentioned many of the prob- presents Charlie Chapiin's, "'The his class at the close of the currentk
lems that Dorr and others did, Great Dictator" in the architec- term.heeno usol oucl
with special and slightly differ- tur'e auditorium. lege will be given a list of delinquent,
ent slants on the experimentation 8 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Figure accounts.
and service teaching questions. Skating Club will present "Mel- Payments may be made in person,
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 10151
Felheim said that the advan- ody on Ice" on the University Admin. Bldg., before 4:30 p.m., Feb. 26.1
tage of a large university is "than ice rink. Mail Payments postmarked after due{
we are big, that we can conduct 8 p.m.-University players will date; Feb. 26. 1965, are late and sub-
all kinds of experiments by using present Chez Torpe in Trueblood Ident f ni payments as tuition and
the complete resources of the Uni- Auditorium. show student number and name.
versity rather than by narrowing 8 p.m.-The Foresters' Club WillI state Farm Companies Foundation:
the whole." sponsor their annual Paul Bunyan Announces its $750 Exceptional Student
Other Experiments Bail in the League Ballroom. Fellowship. These are limited to stu-I
He continued with the remark 8:30 p.m.-The Budapest String dents who have fulfilled enrollment
that there have been and are requirements for either the senior, or
Quartet will perform in Rackham first year of graduate school and are
o t h e r University' experiments Auditorium. majoring in the areas of business ad-
which "simply haven't been sup- SUNDAY, FEB. 21 ministration, accounting, finance, in-
ported." He asked why the Univer- 4 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Sym- vestments, marketing, mathematics, sta-
tistics, insurance, law, economics, or
sity does not support the experi- phony Orchestra, conducted by other business related programs of
ments it already has. Emil Holz, will present a Youth study. A candidate must be nominated
As an example of this, he cited Concert at the Ann Arbor High before March 15 by his dean or de-
freshman-sophomore counseling, School Aud. Admission is free. pament chai rmawards will be made
which entails for the faculty mem- 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will on the basis of:
ber "little status, inadequate mon- present Charlie Chaplin's "The 1. Demonstrated leadership in ex-
ey," and a great deal of gruelling Great Dictator" in the architecture tracurricular activities.
time and effort. "We do not need auditorium mum.Scholarship ("B" average mini-
a residential college for counsel- 8:30 p.m.-The Michigan Sym- 3. Character.
ing," Felheim said. phony Orchestra, conducted by 4. Potential business administrative
Another example he brought up Josef Blatt, will give a public pon- sa Recommendations of instructors,
was the honors college, which is cert in Hill Aud. The program counselors, and other responsible citi-
"not supported by the administra- will include Prelude to "The After- zens.
tion." noon of a Faun" by Debussy; Lecture: Isaac B. Singer, critic and
In contrast to Dorr, Felheim "Classical Symphony, Op. 25" by novelist, "The Cabbala and the Mod- !
thinks that the residential college Prokofiev; "Variations on a 'Theme ern Mind," Mon., Feb. 22, 4:10 p.m., Aud.
will do service teaching. He made by Joseph Hadn," by Brahms; B, Angell Hall. All interested persons
the point that the architecture anc and "Till Eulenspiegel's Merry are invited to attend.
design school and the music school Pranks" by Richard Strauss. Applications for General Undergrad-
will be right there on North Cam-
pus. W g#E 22mmsasusmamgmngg a
"Will those students be sent
1-ORGANIZATION NOTICES

Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9:10 P.M.

J

- -I

JAMES
GARNER
EVA MARIE
SAINT
TAYLOR

DIAL 8-6416
"GO
TO
SEE
Pierre Etaix its
--Crowther, N.Y. Times

&MARVELOUS...
A FILM TO SEE
..A CAUSE FOR
I) a
"Etaix has made
something wholly new-and
delightful. I advise you
to make his acquaintance
right nove l--newdye"M
"SHOULD CONVULSE
YOU E-at, nw

THE WILDEST
SPIT ADVENTURE
MAN EVER LIVED!
PAAYISlON

f,

i

ATTENTION FRESHMEN!
SOPH SHOW
Interviews Mon.-Wed., Feb. 22-24
for GENERAL CO-CHAI RMEN & DI RECTOR
Information and Petition Forms
at League Undergraduate Office.

" ILARIOUS.:b nutty
---ALSO--- ...a sight-gag soufflI6I_,,
"CARRY ON SPYING

BRITISH
FARCE

i
i.

Shows Start at
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:05 & 9:15

DIAL 662-6264

HELD OVER
2nd BIG
WEEK
EVERYTHING HE TOUCHES

4

1

TURNS TO EXCITEMENT!

I

I

77e Paul/&9010) (k/I
Saturday, February 20, 1965
League Ballroom

Use of This Column for Announce- and Union, Sun.. Feb. 21, 7 p.m., Uhi-
ments is available to officially recog- tarian Church, Washtenaw Ave.
nized and registered student organiza- * * *
tions only. Forms are available in World University Service, University j
Room 1011 SAB. of Michigan Chapter, General meeting

SQUARE DANCING
ENTERTAINMENT
BALLROOM DANCING

Donation
$2.50
per couple

Tickets on Sale-the Diag, at the Door

I

r

fww-mm -m m=m mmm -mmmmmm=mminmmmm=m=wum=m= =mm
, r
, r
I . d I
r I
TH AGREAT DICTATOR
f is an explosive mixture of poignant characterization and devos- r
toting comedy.
S At the end Chaplin steps out of the character of Adolf Hitler to
exhort Americans to join in the fight against fascism and rid the
iworld of its greatest menace.
r r
, -
: T
Siceplfoive ixtrdfonntcaraclmFetizat in ae ndeas

Lutheran Student Chapel (National
Lutheran Council), Worship Service
(Holy Communion at 9:30), Feb. 21,
9:30 & 11 a.m., Lutheran Student Chap-
el, Hill St. and S. Forest Aye, Sun-
day evening, 7 p.m., "Th Challenge
to Public Universities" with Dean
James H. Robertson, speaker. 8 p.m.,
Universal Day of Prayer Service. A
union service with other student reli-
gious groups.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, "The
Psychological Values of the Christian
Faith," lecture by Dr. Vernon Grounds,
president, Conservative Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary, 4:10 p.m., Aud. A
Feb. 22, *
Newman Student Association, Try-
outs for Newman's production of "Com-
in' Round the Mountain!", Sun., Feb.
21, 3 p.m., Newman Center, 331 Thomp-
Sson.
Newman Student Association, Skatin?
party and outing, Feb. 21, 2 p.m., 331
Thompson,
Unitarian Student Group, Dr. Bishop
"Medicare"; transportation at Lloyd

Mon., Feb. 22, 7 :30 p.m., 3510 SAB.
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, Feb
21, 2 p.m., Rackham, Huron St. en-
trance.
Voice Political Party, Executive Com-
mittee meeting, Mon., Feb. 22, 4 p.m..
in Voice office, 2534 SAB. Discussion
on Voice programming. Everyone is
welcome

GERT[ ROBEas60tOPIGER HONOR BLACKMAN

u ion

1SEAN CONNERY
iGnn OO7P- .IAN flEMINGC
"GOLDFIIYGER"

I

TECHNICOLOR'

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
presents
I THE DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Sixten Ehrling, Conductor
SUNDAY, LEBRUARY 28, 2:30 P.M.
in Hill Auditorium
(REPLACING THE POLISH MIME THEATRE, IN THE EXTRA SERIES,
ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED FOR FEBRUARY 23.)

I

SHIRLEY EATON

*9

presented by

The Vulcons & The Engineering Council
SATURDAY. FEB. 27

I

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We hove the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.

I

I

I

I

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