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February 16, 1965 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-16

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TUESDAY, 16 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Expect New Cvilian
Re ime in Viet Nam
Phan Huy Quat Emerges as Leader;
Soldiers Break Up Demonstrations
SAIGON ()-Troops broke up antigovernment demonstrations at
two northern towns yesterday while Saigon awaited the proclamation
of a new regime expected to be headed by Phan Huy Quat.
The Viet Cong may have inspired both outbursts.
About 2000 persons stormed the district chief's office at 'hang
Binh, 20 miles south of the United States-Vietnamese air base at Da
Nang, demanding an end to air and artillery warfare within populated
b areas.
Troops fired when the demonstrators pressed in, disregarding the
district chief's attempt to explain the government's position. Some
-persons were reported killed, oth-
K ers wounded, the rest dispersed..
K 1 g8 !,_ Soldiers Intervene
Other soldiers broke up another
lllS crowd that gathered outside Tam
Ky, 20 miles farther south.
Skirmishing afield resumed its
normal tempo after a week mark-
SELMA. Ala. (P)-Martin Luth- ed by three U.S.-Vietnamese air
er King, Jr. led a freedom march strikes at North Viet Nam in re-
of more than 1200 adult Negroes prisal for terrorist Viet Cong at-
on the Dallas County courthouse tacks against American and Viet-
ithout incident yesterday. There namese personnel.
were no arrests. Saigon authorities charged that
Ariaddtioal 50 egr scooltroops from five Communist North
An addstoace tNgo scholate Vietnamese divisions have infil-
children also mrchwedr o she trated South Viet Nam since 1959.
courthouse but were turned back They said at least 39,000 men
by Selma's public safety director, have made the crossing and that,
P Wilson Baker. of these, more than 25,000 rank-
The teenagers arrived in a sec- ed as squad leaders or higher.
Fnd wave about an hour after the Installations
adults and were diverted across, A statement listed seven North
the street from the courthouse. Vietnamese installations as figur-
Baker told the Rev. Andrew khg heavily in the infiltration. By
Young, an aide to King, "you Implication, all seven are poten-
broke your promise. Take them tially targets for any future bomb-
back to the church." Ing raids.
Leader Complied The expected announcement of
Young complied and the pupils a new government, the eighth
marching two abreast, walked the shakeup in 16 months, was de-
10 blocks back to the church layed. Informed sources said there
where they had massed. leas a snag about the appointment
The safety director said the civil of a new interior minister.
Tghseaery dir r ared t to The nominee was Tran Van
rights leaders had agreed not to Tuyen, slated also to become a
use the children. He had given eputy premier. He is of North
the adults a parade permit Sun- detypmer. e is of Noth
day ightVietnamese extraction and the
day night. military, while liking him per-
The march was by far the larg- sonally, questioned whether a man
est since the right to vote cam- with such a background could well
paign began Jan. 18. handle Interior ministry dealings
Registration ; with the touchy religious groups
No official figures are kept for of South Viet Nam.
voter registration in Selma alone; Real Power
the registration is county-wide. Of k The real power in the direction
the 15,115 Negroes of voting ago of Saigon affairs, however, will
throughout the county, about 600 ,emain with Lt. Gen. Nguyen
are said to be on the voting list. Khanh, the armed forces com-
The county has 14,400 white per- mander. He and his generals will
sons of voting age and of these serve in a watchdog capacity.
more than 9500 are voters. At Qui Nhon, 270 miles north-
Since the drive began, the board east of Saigon, excavators recov-
of registrars has not announced ered another American body from
the number of Negroes who have the ruins of a U.S. enlisted men's
registered to vote. The board is billet bombed last Wednesday
under court order, however, to night. The known death toll rose
process at least 100 applications to nine. Twelve Americans were
each day it is open. still missing, presumably dead.
World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
HAMMOND, Ind-A federal judge refused yesterday to order a
recount of some 8,000 ballots cast in voting for president of the United
Steelworkers Union.
JudgeGeorge N. Beamer of United States district court ruled his
jurisdiction under the present circumstances was limited to preserving
the integrity of the ballot. He directed that the ballots, impounded
Saturday, remain in the court's custody until proper steps are taken
for their release.
In Pittsburgh, a prominent MacDonald supporter said that
Abel's forces will have an advantage in settling election disputes
before election tellers.
NEW DELHI - Fresh rioting
erupted in south India yesterday
and aembm'er of parlaent de-
manded that Prime Minister Lal W STD TZIN TO
Bahadur Shastri resign to end THE STUDENT ZIONIST C
the bloody controversy over mak- AND THE ISRAELI STt

*ing Hindi India's official lan-
guage. INVITE
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Food and
Drug Administration yesterday or-
dered nasal methamphetamdine in-A . AT
halers restricted to sale by pre-
scription only because more and FEATI
more people are using the con- -AG L
gestion-relieving ingredients as a THENAGIL
stimulant for kicks. SKITS
SANTA MONICA, Calif.-Popu- AND DANCING
lar singer Nat (King) Cole died
yesterday at 45, a victim of can- COME AT 8:30
cer.

CRITICIZES BLISS:
Attacks GOP on Race Issue

By CAL SKINNER, JR., 1
special To The Daily
OBERLIN, Ohio - Republican
Party chairman-elect Ray Bliss1
was verbally attacked in his home1
state last weekend.
Speaking at the Oberlin College
Lincoln Day Dinner, Grant Rey-;
nolds of the National Negro Re-
publican Assembly questioned
"whether 'Dr. Bliss' has the pro-
per medicine to cure this sick
party. It is an exercise in futility
to try to reorganize this party,
without the Negro."
Referring to "racial exclusive-
ness" during the Goldwater cam-
paign, Reynolds observed, "I find
nothing within our party machin-
ery to correct this party's mis-
takes, but I don't propose to allow
anybody to drive me away from
my political home."
Demands Removal
Reynolds called for removal of
the "architects of disaster" from
positions of power in the Republi-
can Party. Specifically, he urged
Bliss' dismissal of national com-
mittee executive director A. B.
Hermann of New Jersey.
'His name is anathema in the
Negro community," according to
Reynolds. Hermann and the head
of the GOP's minorities division
Clay Claiborne were responsible
for the preparation and dissemi-
nation of campaign literature to
the Negro community which used
Martin Luther King's name with-
out permission. Claiborne is now
. under indictment in New Jersey,
but still on the Republican Party
payroll.
e Reynolds also denounced the
emerging Dixie Republicans. He
advised the party to offer a "stan-
d ard around which Southern Ne-

that is done, the Negro can take
care of himself."
Admitting "I have no doubt that
tomorrow I will be denounced by
my party's leaders," Reynolds at-
tacked 1960 presidential candidate
Richard Nixon for not being "able
to summon a modicum of human-
ity during his campaign." Besides
not sending a telegram to Mrs.
Martin Luther King when King
was jailed, Nixon ignored every
center of Negro population in the
country, according to Reynolds.
"Nixon pulled defeat right cut of
the jaws of victory."
Reynolds took it for granted
that Goldwater had ignored the
Negroes and commented only that
he is corresponding with Gold-
water in an effort to convince ham
the Negro community is important
to the Republican Party.
Negro Vote
"We can concede sixty per cent
of the Negro vote and win any-
where, Reynolds asserted. He cit-
ed election results in KansasrCity,
Missouri, and Hyde Point, North
Carolina, as evidence; that Re-
publicans can attract Negroes.

Commenting on GOP presiden-
tial prospects for 1968, Reynolds
predicted that one of the "big
t h r e e, Scranton, Romney or
Rockefeller." would receive the
nomination. But, he conceded,
"Every well-known Republican
has a handicap.
-NAACPRaps
lfini Coaches
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (A) - Negro
athletes are being advised by a
University of Illinois chapter of
the NAACP not to enroll at the
Big Ten school.
In a resolution, the chapter yes-
terday charged certain coaches
had warned Illini Negro athletes
"to limit their coeducational so-
cial contacts to fellow Negroes."
The coaches were not identified.
University President David D.
Henry and a university athletic
spokesman, both declined to com-
ment on the resolution.

AN INSIDE JOB? ON-THE-SCENE SKETCH by cartoonist Bill Mauldin depicts a United States
helicopter exploding from the inside during last week's raids on U.S. facilities in South Viet Nam.
The blast from inside, Mauldin said, "suggests hand-placed charges as well as mortars at this end of
the landing strip."
Shifts Strategy Against Viet Cong

G-- AI Er

SAIGON ,')--The United States I beat the Communist forces in VietI

has tacitly recognized that it can-
not currently beat the Viet Cong
on the ground without commit-
ting hundreds of thousands of
troops. As a result it has in ef-
fect taken to the air to try to
Europeans Call
For Negotiated
Peace in Asia
PARIS (A')-There is a steadily
growing conviction in Western
Europe that the explosive Viet
Nam crisis must be moved from
the battlefield to the conference
table.
This attitude, reflected officially
and in the press, arises from
genuine fear that holocaust may
be just around the corner.
Heightened Viet Cong activity
and reprisal bombings brought the
Viet Nam situation to a new crisis
which has convinced most Euro-
peans the time has come to stop
fighting and start talking.
While there has been no gen-
eral criticism of recent United
States air action in North Viet
Nam-barring left wing and Com-
munist groups-war-wise Euro-
peans are frightened.
Their fears of general conflict
have put many on the side of
President Charles de Gaulle of
France. He has said all along that
the only solution to the Viet Nam
situation was negotiation, leading
toward neutrality.
De Gaulle would like to see Viet
Nam's neutrality guaranteed on
the one hand by Red China, and
the other by America's Seventh
Fleet.
Britain, while in support of the
reprisal attacks on North Viet
Nam and American policy in gen-
eral, is frankly worried that there
is danger of escalation. To that
end, some British officials also
would like to see a brand new
Geneva conference on the ques-
tion.

Nam with another type of war.
This policy decision was many
months in coming. It exploded in-
to reality a week ago when Viet
Cong raiders successfully attacked
two major American installations
at Pleiku on the same day. Re-
taliatory air raids against North
Viet Nam began.
There seems little hope of ever'
protecting American installations
here against the guerrillas, no
matter what is done on the
ground. The Viet Cong now ap-
pears to have opened a fullfledg-
ed campaign against bases.
Retaliation
The Vietnamese and American
retaliatory air raids last week on
North Viet Nam are not expected
to have a direct effect on the
guerrillas. U.S. officials do not be-
lieve the raids will seriously ham-
per Viet Cong infiltration routes.
These air raids are based on
two assumptions.
The first is that they will hurt
Dr scare Hanoi and its Commu-
nist allies enough that they will
send cease-fire orders to the Viet
Cong in the South.
The second is that, if such or-
ders should be transmitted by

Neither of these assumptions is
a certainty, and air raids are a
longshot gamble. But it is a gam-
ble worth taking right now, U.S
officials feel, if all is not to be
lost. Air raids so far have been
confined to military installations
It is difficult to tell how much
damage the North Vietnamese
forces suffered in last week's raids
Photograhps taken by partici-
pating planes show one-story bar-
racks, some of them damaged
surrounded by foxhole positions.
Despite charges by Communist
China and Hanoi that 10,000 wer
killed in the Dong Hoi raid alone
North Vietnamese casualties prob-
ably have-been fairly light.
The point is that similar re-
prisal raids may be mounted
against populous North Vietna
mese cities and plants, including
Hanoi itself. U.S. and Vietnamese
leaders have refused to rule ou
this possibility.
iStudent Mar'cel To
Ask Policy Shift
Student for a Democratic So
ciety is sponsoring a student pro
test march to Washington or
April 17 to call for an end ti

VFW Hall

314 E. Liberty
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19

9-12 P.M.
One Dollar Donation

Stag or Drag
Refreshments

A RDEN MIESEN'S BAND
Sponsored by Graduate Student Council
This is the Last Mixer of the Semester

'-

groes can stand," instead
ing them into the arm
t Democrats."

e
d
e
t
1
-
n
0

Attract Voters
"If we believe in th
right to vote we stand
chance of attracting tl
voters," Reynolds assert
DANCE to
WASHBOARD WI
LIVE ENTERTAINA
Tues. & Wed. 9 p.m
at the SCHWABEN
215 S. Ashley
Read
DaIy
Classifie

d of dirv- m ee
s of the
ze simple
14 great
hese new
ed. "Once GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
WELCOMES
THE STUDENT COMMUNITY
LUE FOR LUNCH OR DINNER
MENTFR
IN45 TODAY'S SPECIAL
INN
r GERMAN STYLE ROLLED AND STUFFED
---- BEEF TENDERLOIN, SPATCEN, GREEN
BEAN SALAD, ROLL & BUTTER .......$1.25
GERMAN MEAT PATTY
ON RYE, KOSHER PICKLES ..35c
300 S. Thayer 665-4967
~OPEN 7 to 7'
id s 4 ,11y pa

Hanoi, they would be followed by Unitel States intervention in Viet
the Viet Cong. I(Nam.

A

L

'decorator
furnished, fully carpeted

. .

mm

......

R

14

I

PROFESSOR JASON H. TICKTON
of Music Faculty, Wayne State University
and1
Director of Music-Organist, Temple Beth El, Detroit
GIVES AN ILLUSTRATED LECTURE
onl
"The Wonderful Heritage of Hebrew Music"
Sunday, February 21, 8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION IS FREE 1429 HILL STREET
B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

I

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THE UNIVERSITY ACTIVITY CENTER
OF THE MICHIGAN UNION AND WOMEN'S LEAGUE
presents
N THE MIDST OF PLENTY
A Symposium on American Poverty
Symposium Introduction by PRESIDENT HARLAN HATCHER
Keynote Address by MICHAEL HARRINGTON-
"IN THE MIDST OF PLENTY"

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