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February 07, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-07

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SUNDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PArv nrimiovv

SU DY,7F B UA Y165TE.I H G N --I '~W

PAUE THREE

I41

Membership To Decide
USM Leadership Contest

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PANELS ON WORLD AFFAIRS
Discusses NATO Transition

._ i

PITTSBURGH (P)-A split in
leadership of the once-solid steel-
workers,union reaches the telltale
stage Tuesday in-membership bal-
loting.
About 976,000 members will be
eligible to vote. They'll choose a
president from between two men
who, side-by-side, have led them
for more than 12 years.
Contenders for a four-year term
starting June 1 are incumbent
David J. McDonald and his chief
lieutenant, Secretary-Treasurer I.
W. Abel.
Narrow Decision
Everything points to a narrow
T decision in this struggle for con-
trol of the AFL-CIO UnitedrSteel-
workers of. America, the nation's
third largest union which boasts
assets of $23 million.
This is the first real threat to
the rule of a USW president in
the organization's 22-year exist-
ence. It also is one of the few
times the head of a major union
has been challenged for re-
election.
Founded in 1942, the offspring
of John L. Lewis' United Mine
Workers, the steelworkers union
traditionally has stressed unity
and close-knit leadership.
Hierarchy Split
Early last November a split in
the union hierarchy, apparently
festering for some time, came out
in the open. Abel announced he'd
run against McDonald.
The knockdown fight erupted
at a crucial time. This year the
steelworkers negotiate new con-
tracts with the basic steel in-
dustry-a vital force in the na-
tional economy-as well as the
aluminum, can and steel fabricat-
ing industries.
As President Lyndon B. John-
son's Council of Economics Ad-
visers said recently, "Prompt and
responsible settlement in the steel
industry is important for sustain-
ed, balanced advance In 1965."
Foundering Negotiations
Basic steel talks soon foundered,
had to be suspended Jan. 8 until
after the union election.
Since then McDonald, colorful,
articulate and outgoing, and Abel,
unpretentious, soft-spoken and
retiring, have been on the cam-;
paign trail.
McDonald has keyed his can-
didacy to the theme that he is a'
"good, hard-nosed negotiator,"
and calls this the union's most
pressing need.
He has characterized Abel as a
"clerk," somebody out of his depth

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fourth in a series of articles on
panels on world affairs held at the
Overseas Press Club last weekend.
By DEBORAH BEATTIE
Associate Editorial Director
Special To The Daily
NEW YORK-"The North At-
lantic Treaty Alliance is not'
crumbling, but changing; it is
reported crumbling because we
fail to see the changes." This was
Time-Life News Service represen-
tative R. Edward Jackson's im-
mediate response to the topic of
"The Crumbling Atlantic Al-
liance."
Discussing the problems of
Western Europe at the seventh
annual College Editors' Confer-
ence with Jackson were Emanuel
Freedman, Sidney Gruson and
Paul Hofmann, of The New York
Times.
"If we expect everything from
NATO, then it is crumbling. But
if we consider its original function
-protection-then it is not fail-,
ing," Jackson contended.
De Gaulle
The panel agreed that the al-
liance is shaky because of French
President Charles de Gaulle. De
Gaulle wants a Europe united
under France, rather than under
the U.S.
Freedman pointed out that Eur-
ope is changing because Eastern
and Western Europe are coming
together and the Iron Curtain is
coming down. De Gaulle saw this
trend and encouraged it; Wash-
ington was slower to realize it.
De Gaulle has developed eco-
nomic and cultural ties with East-
ern Europe, realizing that the
more these ties are developed, the
more independent of Moscow
these countries will be, Freedman
explained. This makes it easier

for de Gaulle to negotiate with
them.
From a European's point of
view, de Gaulle -is so strong that
our policy toward him has been
a failure-he has many cards to
play.
The panel pointed out that tae
crisis between the U.S. and ,France
deeply involves West Germaay, the
great land power, and Great Brit-
ain with its special alliances.
De Gaulle insists that France's
military, diplomatic and economic
resources and Germany's warlike
reputation make it imperative
that France be the European lead-
er. Because of this, de Gaulle is
particularly irritated by the nu-
clear ties between the U.S. and
Great Britain. But if the U.S. and
nuclear power could be eliminated,
De Gaulle would be willing to,
share power with Britain.
A diminuation of the special
ties between Britain and the U.S.
would be best for both sides, Giu-
son declared.
La Gloire
Jackson noted, however, that
although de Gaulle knocked she
chip off the French shoulder and
restored la gloire, France couldn't;
possibly be as important after de
Gaulle's death. His death won't
change policy, but without de
Gaulle's dominant personality,
French policy decisions will have
less force.
De Gaulle was able to defeat
the U.S. multilateral force pro-
posal because he faced Europeans
with the attitude that going along
with the U.S. would be considered
a break from France. Thus the
same Europeans who had sought
the MLF backed down.
Gruson believes it was a tns-
take for President Johnson not
to demand support for its plsn
because it made the U.S. look weak

i vis a vis de Gaulle. It set back
any resolution of this issue sev -
eral years, because the U.S. is un-
willing to face confrontation now.
But it will have to face it' some
day, he commented.
Germany Unity?
As for the reunification of West
Germany, the panel agreed that
there are only two countries which
really want it to happen-West
Germany and the U.S. It is a raw
nerve to Eastern and Western
Europe, where a divided Germany
is considered a prerequisite toE
world peace.
The British are horrified at
> the idea, and de Gaulle will fight
it with everything in his power,
Gruson said.
Responding to questions about
the Common Market, Hofmann in-!
dicated an inherent weakness in
its present structure "The Com-'
mon Market is a cozy club of
'haves' in a larger club of 'haves'-
all white, all in the North. Out-
side are the 'have-nots'-the
colored poor-pressing against it.
History shows that the barbarians
always prevail."
Can't Continue
Jackson added that because
there is pressure on the Common
Market from other European.
countries, it cannot continue to
shut itself away and keep every-
body waiting.
Hofmann called for the U.S. toI
use its political influence to prod
the Common Market countries to
invest in underdeveloped areas
and open their membership rather
than support a cozy island of well-'
being.
Predicting the future of the
Western alliance, the panel agreed
that the community of interest
of Western powers will keep it
together, regardless of the techni-
cal devices used. NATO's scope is
limited, and it will have to be
reorganized, but many members
want more political dialogue which
would be a basis for reorganiza-
tion.
"There is conflict because there
is interest," Hofmann said.

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A MEMBERSHIP VOTE of the steelworkers union will decide
whether David McDonald, incumbent president (left) or I. W.
Abel, his executive secretary (right) will lead the union. The
campaigns will reach their climax Tuesday with an election.
Authorities predict a close decision. In 1957, Donald C. Rarick
of Pittsburgh ran against McDonald on the issue of a union dues
increase. He lost by almost two to one. That was the only con-
test for the presidency since McDonald took office.

All Boots . . .
value to 18.99

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in the give-and-take of the bar- Union members from Mont
gaining table. to Birmingham, Ala., from1
Abel, on his part, has empha- falo to Los Angeles, will
sized what he terms McDonald's ballots at their home locals, wl
lack of rapport with the mill- number 3,300. Unofficial rer
workers. He says McDonald has are expected to be available 'i
assumed too much authority and day evening from the opp(
that the "basic democratic tra- I camps.
ditions of our union have been: ---- -.-- --
subverted."
Both have indulged freely in IS
name-calling and sarcasm, be- L). D
littling each other's role in the
trade union movement. D -- A

9:00 to 5:30,

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. Easy Victory But1 Toral Allocation Hits
Each predicts he'll easily win
the job, and carry along his can- WASHINGTON (;P - Defense for all defense programs beginning
didates for secretary-treasurer chiefs say that the high cost of in fiscal 1962 and projected
and vice-president positions, arming against all-out nuclear through fiscal 1966, the allocation
Running with McDonald are wr is past the peak-but the five- for the Strategic Retaliatory Sys-
Howard R. Hague, incumbent year buildup cost totals more than tem amounts to $34.5 billion.
vice-president seeking re-election, $44 billion. Second Package
and Albert Whitehouse, district 25 Deputy Secretary of Defense This does not include a second
director at Cincinnati, Ohio, for Cyrus R. Vance, speaking for ail- package, labeled "Continental Air
secretary-treasurer. ing Secretary Robert S. McNa- and Missile Defense Forces," which
Abel's mates are Joseph P. mara, has been giving the House totals $10 billion for the five years.
Molony, Buffalo, N.Y., districtdi- Armed Services Committee the de- That is considered direct defense
rector, for vice-president, and fense department's annual report against nuclear attack on- the
Walter J. Burke, 53, district direc- on the nation's military position. United States and complements
tor at Milwaukee. for secretary- Analysis of the budget shows the retaliatory action which would
treasurer. that of the $247.7 billion outlay amount to offensive action for
- purposes of defense.
The $34.5-billion program pro-
posed for strategic retaliatory
O Rsourdup forces ll the next fiscal year is
the smallest since the buildup was
_started with a $9-billion commit-
ment in fiscal 1962.
y The Associated Press As "packaged" for budgetary
UNITED NATIONS--The President of the General Assembly was and functional programs, the stra-
reported yesterday to be sounding out delegations on a proposal to te retaliatory force consists of:
over 850 inter-continental ballis-
send five or six world figures to major capitals to raise money for t i1 9on 1 neP bomb-

44 Bi 11101
The strategic retaliatory forces
item of the budget encompasses
whole weapons systems, of which
the cost for weapons themselves
are only a part. Also included are
the costs of building launching
complexes and control systems for
missiles, airdromes for bombers,
pay for personnel, maintenance
and operation of equipment, the

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presents

'jRogers

DR. A LLEN S. W HITING
speaking on
COMMUNIST CHINA'"S
FOREIGN POLICY POSITIONS
Dr. Whiting is director of the Office of
Research and Analysis for the Far East
in the Department of State. He has

4

the United Nations.
Diplomatic sources said Assembly President Alex Quaison-Sackey

of Ghana has suggested that the

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mission visit Washington, Moscow,
Paris and London for contribu-
tions to erase the deficit caused'
by the refusal of the Soviet Union,
France and others to pay UN
peace-keeping assessments.
NASHVILLE-A federal judge
ordered the Tennessee state sen-
ate yesterday to readmit reporters
from the Nashville Tennessean to
its sessions, saying the public as
well as the newspaper would suf-
fer if a ban is continued.
A temporary restraining order
was issued against speaker of the
senate Jardd L. Maddux and 11
sergeants-at-arms by U.S. District
Judge William E. Miller.
MILWAUKEE-A medical con-
sultant to the Department of De-1
fense says astronaut Alan Shepard
has an impaired sense of balance
which may prevent him from any,
further rocket flights.
* # ,.

, g *CtC.<A<)- ge UV-
ers and 22 Polaris submarines,
with a total of 352 missiles in their
launching tubes.
Total Forces
By the end of the next fiscal
year, ICBMs are scheduled to total
1,000. There will be some reduc-
tion in the number of manned
bombers as older aircraft are
phased out, but by the end of the
next fiscal year more than 30 of
the scheduled total 41 Polaris sub-
marines will be in operation.
McNamara,when he appears be-
fore the committee with his sev-
eral civilian and military assist-
ants will give Congress detailed
cost figures to explain the military
requirements.

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published four books on China.

"THE JEWISH
IN RU
A Lecture by PROF
Dept. of
8 P.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun

CARLISLE, England-- Thieves
stole a quarter of mile of signal
and telephone cable south of Car-
lisle yesterday and stopped trains
between England and Scotland.

SECRETARY McNAMARA 4
submarines for launching the mis-
siles and the sea-based and shore-
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