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February 02, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-02

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TUESDAY, 2 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN" DAILY

PAGE T M

tUESDAY, 2 FEBRUARY 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TI1REI~

Police Arrest 250 During

Political Unity Seen as Ideal of Common

-Associated Press

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR., center, leads a group of civil
rights demonstrators and Selma Negroes in prayer after they
were arrested on charges of par'ading without a permit. More
than 250 persons were taken into custory as they marched to the
Dallas County courthouse as part of a voter registration drive.
world News Roundup
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-The United Nations General Assembly yes-
terday averted a United States-Soviet showdown over voting rights'
of debtor nations by agreeing to a week's recess while additional
efforts are made to resolve the issue through negotiations.
* * * *
WASHINGTON-President Lyndon B. Johnson's bill to release
$4.3 billion in gold for defense of the dollar was approved yesterday
by the House Banking Committee,
WASHINGTON-President Lyndon B. Johnson yesterday appeal-
ed for a quick end to the 22-day dock strike along the Atlantic and
Gulf coasts, but union leaders deferred a decision pending outcome
of local voting. About 60,000 workmen are involved in the dispute
which Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz estimates is costing the
nation's economy $60 million to $70 million daily.
VIETIANE-Loyalists yesterday quietly suppressed an uprising
by a group of young officers who said they wanted to reform the
army high command in Laos. There was no bloodshed.
GRAD IX R!
VFW Hall 314 E. Liberty
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5

King Held, Rejects
Release on Bond
SELMA, Ala. () - Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. was arrested
along with more than 250 Negroes
while leading a right to vote pro-
test march yesterday. King re-
fused to post bond, fixed at $200,
when called before a magistrate,
saying he preferred to remain in
jail.
King was arrested by city police
while leading a march to the Dal-
las County courthouse where other
Negroes tried again to register as
voters as they have for the past
two weeks.
Arrested together with the 1964
Nobel Peace Prize winner was one
of his top aides, the Rev. Ralph
Abernathy. King, Abernathy and
their followers were charged with
parading without a permit after
disregarding a warning from
Selma's public safety director,
Wilson Baker.
When King went before city
judge Edgar P. Russell, he walked
out of the courtroom and told
newsmen he did not intend to
seek release on bond for the time
being.
Ungess.he does post bond he will
remain in jail until his case is
heard on Feb. 15. Maximum pen-
alty for the offenseunder the city
is 180 days i jail and a $100 fine.
Court Decides
On Districting
WASHINGTON (JP) - The Su-
preme Court yesterday upheld the
broad power of lower courts to re-
duce the normal terms of legisla-
tors in New York and Virginia
during reapportionment of their
districts.
The court thereby took another
step to buttress the effect of its
decision last June that state leg-
islatures must be aligned on a
"one-man, one-vote" formula.
Yesterday's 7-2 decision upheld
action by a three-judge district
court in New York City last July
27 and by a similar special court
in Alexandria, Va., Sept. 18.
The court in Alexandria ruled
that Virginia's state senators
elected in 1963 under an invali-
dated apportionment plan could
serve only two years of their
four-year terms-until next No-
vember-and directed that the
General Assembly be reapportion-
ed by then.
The court in New York City
ruled last summer that legislators
In the state could be elected in
November as scheduled under an
invalidated apportionment but for
one-year terms, instead of the
normal two.
The two dissenters, Justices
John Harlan and Thomas Clark,
questioned the scope of federal
government power to act in this
area.
LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"THEORY OF CONFLICT"
Speaker:
PROF. KENNETH BOULDING
Director, Center for Research
on Conflict Resolution
For reservations, call 668-6076
Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article, the
last in a three-part series onythe
European Economic Community,
discusses the ideal of a politically
unified Europe that lies behind the
EEC
By DICK WINGFIELD
The theory of comparative ad-
vantage made the European Eco-
nomic Community feasible eco-
nomically; but the anticipation of
European unity made the Com-
munity palatable and meaningful
both on the continent and
throughout the world.
In rough analogy, the economic
benefits accruing from the EEC
formed the physical anatomy; and
the dreams of a political, and
military union formed the soul of
the Community,
Because, just as a unified Eu-
rope would bring increased in-
come and more meaningful do-
mestic foreign and defense policy
for the nations of the Community,
it would also prove to be a deci-
sive stimulant for world trade.
Western Alliance ,
The ambitions of the EEC to
bind their resources into a poli-
tical-military union are directed
not only to benefit Europe, but
also to formalize and solidify the
European sector of the Western al-
liance. According to Commissioner
Hans von der Groeben, the EEC
has maintained the goals of poli-
tical union and Atlantic partner-
ship with the U.S. since the Trea-
ty of Rome in 1957.
Andre Rossi, French member of
the European Parliament, said
that the Treaty of Rome "is more
than an agreement for economic
cooperation or the most important
political treaty ever signed on our
Continent. It is a political treaty
with a political aim-the federa-
tion of our six countries."
Practically all parties are agreed
that Europe will profit from inte -
gration. However, there are ele-
mentary obstacles to the attain-
ment of the union.
French Veto
First, French President Charles
de Gaulle vetoed Britain's bid for
membership in the Common Mar-
ket in 1963. He used as ration-
ale the fact that Britain had al-
legiances to members of the Com-
monwealth, and that the Com-
Mon Market wouldbetobligated to
show these nations economic priv-
ileges which wold be detrimental
to the Common Market master
plan.
In essence, de Gaulle's deci-
sion was a one-man choice. All the
other nations supported Britain's
membership. An Italian spokes-
man said that, if given the choice,
he would rather have seen Britain
as a member than France.
But, although the other nations
objected and sympathized with
Britain, de Gaulle's decision had
to stand, and the other parties had
to accept it passively. Rejecting
the petition of Britain in 1963
has brought upon the Community
a degree of responsibility for Brit-
ain's recalcitrance in trade affairs.
Without consulting any nations
Britain levied a 15 per cent sur-
,harge on manufactured and semi-
manufactured goods entering the
United Kingdom effective after
October 27 of 1964. It is clear
that this unseen surcharge will
menace the Kennedy Round of
tariff reductions; however it is
equally clear that had Britain
been negotiating as a member of
the Common Market this sur-
charge would not have been neces-
sary, particularly in the manner in
which it was levied.
Repercussions
In essence, the Common Mar-
ket rejected Britain and cut off a
part of their rapport with the
outside world in 1963; now, as it is

beginning to feel the repercus-
sions of that rejection, the Com-
munity is again reminded of its
relationship to the other nations
of Europe and to the world. Since
de Gaulle chose not to accept Brit-
ain because he did not want to
deal with the nations of the Com-
monwealth on a political-military
basis, he is now finding that he
will have to deal with them any-
way on an economic basis-under
less desirable terms.
A second and more widespread
problem in the Common Market is
the difficulty of setting the price
on grain. Commissioner Hans von
der Groeben contended on Nov.
20, 1964 that the movement for
European unity depends in a large
part on the agreement on a com-
mon Community grain price.
The grain price is influential
in determining the amount of do-
mestic production. Imports of a
number of farm commodities are
influenced by the grain price un-
der the Community's variable levy
system. According to Commission-j
er Hans von der Groeben, theE
Community has proven to be the
basis for European policy in trade.,
The economic policy of the Com-
munity is divided between the in-
dustrial products, where there has
already been great progress in
forming an internal policy and ag-
ricultural products, where there isj
yet a considerable amount to be
accomplished.
Agricultural Trade
However, the attainment of a1
uniform internal policy on agri-
cultural trade within the Com-
munity does not hinge upon agri-
;ulture alone. The bargaining upon
these products is a part of the
whole spectrum of cooperation inI
foreign policy and defense policy.
It is conceivable, therefore, that if
the other nations persist in their
desire to form the trans-Atlantic
nuclear bloc with the U.S. - toj
which de Gaulle objects-FranceI
may be more and more obstinant
in the parley over grain prices.
The dissension may postpone
unity in all areas, and further
block the ultimate goals of the
Community. The important con-
sideration is that while the basis
for unity is economic, there are
many factors weighing upon the
formulation of a uniform economic
policy-especially in agriculture,
where the negotiation of grain
prices looms as perhaps the most
important single roadblock on the
path to European unity.
There are many indications of
the great efforts made by Euro-
peans to achieve the unity they
are seeking. One such indication
is Europe's growing concern for
depressed areas. According to the,
"European Community Bulletin,"
the EEC Commission will soon'
submit to the Council of Minis-
ters proposals for a common re-
gional policy in order to spread
prosperity to the "poverty pock-
ets" of the Community.
The three-pronged attempt will
include:
-Speeding economic develop-
ment in underdeveloped areas;
-Restoring economic impetus
in depressed industrial areas, and
-Encouraging firms to locate in
these areas without running coun-
ter to the Community's fair com-
petition policy.
Specific Plans
A second indication of the de-
voted efforts toward unity in the
Community is the quality of for-
malized plans submitted which

PRESIDENT DE GAULLE

outline specific procedures for the
achievement of the Europeon un-
ion. One such plan was announc-
ed Nov. 6, 1964 by the German
government. The plan was divid-
ed into two parts: Part one out-
lined the need for cooperation in
the field of foreign policy, de-
fense, and cultural affairs. Part
two provided for progressive de-
velopment of European unifica-
tion in the fields of industrial and
social policy. The basis of the pro-
posals was to strengthen and ex-
tend the association of the, mem-
ber states of the European Com-
munities and thus to provide fur-
ther impetus to the unification of
Europe.
The German plan was broken
into stages: In the first stage, the
governments were to prepare for a
closer union, and "to fix the pre-
requisites for the entry of other
European states. The second stage
included "a faster realization of
the customs union which would
provide an impetus for a speed-
ier establishment of an economic
union." Step three called for: a
common monetary policy; adjust-
ment of national budgetary poli-
Support
the Annual
Kiwanis Sale
Feb.11, 12,13
Nat'l. Guard
Armory-All
proceeds to
those in need
regardless of
race, color or
creed.
AUSTIN'
DIAMOND
'1209 S. University-663-7151

cies; and ultimately the merging
of all participating nations into a
structure which would embrace the
entire economy of all member
states.
The prospects of a political-
military union will be decided by
the amount of economic unity that
Is achieved. It is safe to anticipate
interruptions in the progress to-
ward unity; hopefully, they will
be mended quickly, so that the
goals of the EEC can be attained
In all areas--economic, political,
and military.
It is the 'obligation of the na-
tions of the European Economic
Community, however, to contin-
ually reassess their goals. The na-
tions of the Western world will
continue to keep vigilance over
the initial goals of the organiza-

MarketI
tion: To become a stimulant for
European and world trade; and
to provide a basis for a trans-At-
lantic partnership to insure the
military position of the Western
world.
In a like manner, many men
in many nations will be ever aware
of the one man in the one nation
who holds the threat of "force de
frappe"-the one man who can
stymie the ascension of Europe to
an even higher status in world
economies. If the Community can
reconcile de Gaulle to considera-
tions of the world as the sphere
of economic and political interest.
it is probable that the European
Economic Community will serve as
an historic model of the execu-
tion of economic theory for the
benefit of all.

HAIR STYLISTS
548 Church St./Phone 662-5683/Huron Towers/Phone 662-5685

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