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February 02, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TiTF.C1IAV_ h i+ VRRITARV 14E21t

4AETW HE M C IGA A

AuZ,-)IJAX, rLDIiUAKY M5

ARTS and LETTERS By Judy Stonehill
Hall Recalls Frost's Life

The 16-year-old boy was sit-
tingg at a lecture at the Bread
Loaf Writers Conference in Mid-
dlebury, Vt. He looked outside and
rising from the hillside was white
Witdbown hair, an old, drawn
4ace; an energetic body. The body
was Donald Hall. The "god rising
out of the ground" was Robert
Frost.
The .two were to meet again,
once at Stanford when Hall was
on a writing fellowship and sev-
eral- times in Cambridge, Mass.,
when he asked Frost to write the
introduction to his anthology,
"New Poets of England and Amer-
ica." .
Last Visit
When Frost made his last visit
to Ann Arbor in 1962 (he was
poet-in-residence here in the early
twenties), Hall enjoyed his com-
pnionshp once more. They talk-
ed about things that both held
dear: poets, poetry, and New Eng-
land.
On Feb. 10, the Professional
Theatre Program will present the
world premiere of "An Evening's
Frost," Hall's new play on the
poet that he .has admired since he
was a boy. The play is being pro-
duced by Marcella Cisney, associ-
Ite director of PT?. y
"It is not really a play," Hall
explained in a recent interview.
The Broadway cast of Will Greer,
Jacqueline Brookes, Staats Cots-
worth and Donald Davis do not
have specific roles. They shift
their identities within the dramat-
10 portrayal so they can present a
full portrait of Frost, not just
mimi his life.-.
"It is in between a poetry read-
ing and a play-more like a plat-
form drama," Hall said. The pro-
duction is about 70 per cent poe-
try reading.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of. Michigan, for Which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3654 Administration Bldg. be-
fere 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 pm. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-Curtis J.
Potter, director of training, Carrier Cor-
eoration, "Pre-Supervisory Selection and
Training": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Clinic on Programmed Learning for
Business-Geary A. Rummer, director,
"On-the-Job Problems of Writing and
administering Programs": Michigan Un-
ion, 8:30 a.m.
Tapiing and Development, Personnel
Office, University Management Seminar
-Le tE. Danielson, associate professor
of industrial relations, "Managing the
Departmental Office": Michigan Union,
1 p.
$Chol of Music Degree Recital-Paul
Heelley, tuba; Recital Hall, School
of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Dept. of English Language and Litera-
ture Lecture: Prof. Ralph Mills, Univer-
sity of Chicago, "Roethke's Last Poems:
The Journey Out of The Self," Tues.,
Feb. 2, 4:10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
All interested persons invited to at-
tend.
Actuarial Club: Edward Lew, actuary
and statistician, Metropolitan Life In-
surance .Co. on "The Shape of Actuar-
ial Problems to Come," Tues., Feb. 2,
4:10 p.m., 1007 Angell Hall.
Astronomical Colloquium: Tues., Feb.
2, 4 p.m. 807 Physics-Astronomy Bldg.
Dr. Hans P. Groth, Dept. of Physics
and Astronomy, State University of
Iowa, "Calculations of Convective Mod-
el Stellar Atmospheres."
Martha Cook Building applications
for residence are due no later than
Fri. Feb. 5. Firt appointments will be
1mVe through Tue,. Feb. 2.

Teaching Seminar: Dr. T. Dunn and
Dr. Mi. Hamres (Chem. Dept.. U. of M.)
"Teaching Methods and Styles," on
Tues., Feb. 12, 5 p.m., 1200 Chem. Bldg.
Special Lecture: Prof. Harry Gray, Co-
lumbia University, "Electronic Struc-
(Continued on Page 8)

1
T
a
a
3

Across
Campus
TUESDAY, FEB. 2
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Ralph Mills of
the University of Chicago will lec-
ture on "Roethke's Last Poems:
The Journey Out of The Self,"
in Aud. A.
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Robin Williams
of the Cornell University sociology1
department will speak on "Social
Science and Social Policy in Race
Relations" in Aud. D.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3
3 p.m. - Clark R. Mollenhoff,
Washington correspondent, will
speak on the "Washington Cover-
Up" in the Rackham Ampithe-
ater, Rackham Bldg.
4 p.m.-Prof. A. Rees Midgley
of the pathology department will
speak on "Human Gonadotropins:
S o m e Recent Immunobiological
Studies" in Rm. 2501, East Medi-
cal Bldg.
7:30 . p.m.-Brice Carnahan of
the engineering college will give
the Ford computer lecture in the
Natural Science Aud.
8 p.m.-Rabbi Sherwin Wine of
the Birmingham Temple, whose
"athiest" position and remarks on
religion and theology have at-
tracted considerable attention re-
cently, will speak on "Humanism
in the Synagogue" at the Hillel
Foundation.
8:30 p.m.-The Undergraduate
Library will present "Rigoletto"
(in English) in the Multipurpose
Rm.
New Activities
Gain Attention
Collegiate Press Service
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Harvard
undergraduates are turning to ex-
tracurricular activities in greater
numbers than ever before and are
leading more meaningful lives as
a result, according to a recent re-
port made by Harvard President
Natham M. Pusey.
"'Big activities' have tended to
give way to those conducted in
smaller groups; and those of a
more mature nature with substan-
tial intellectual content have gain-
ed at the expense of the kind of
earlier undergraduate a c t i v i t y
which seems in retrospect to have
been carried on sometimes almost
for activity's sake," he said.
He attributed the student shift
to more relevant and intellectually
rewarding activity to its increased
sophistication and with its desire
to become actively involved with

'FOUNDING FATHER':
Talks To Honor Cooley,
Former U' Sociologist

By ADA JO SOKOLOV

DONALD HALL (left) is shown with Robert Frost (right), an
inspiration to Hall and other poets of his time. As a eulogy to
Frost, Hall has gathered his poems, letters and memoirs into a
"platform drama," "An Evening's Frost," to be performed by the
Professional Theatre Program on Feb. 10-14.

In honor of the birth centennial
of Charles Horton Cooley, one of
the founding fathers of sociology
and former professor of sociology
I at the University, the sociology
department has invited four prom-
inent sociologists to participate in
a lecture series beginning Febru-
ary 4.
First Speaker
The first speaker will be Prof.
Talcott Parsons of Harvard Uni-
versity. He will speak on "Cool-
ey's Contribution to Internaliza-
tion of Cultural and Social Ele-
nents in the Personality," in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
On February 25 Prof. Leo F.
Schnore of the University will de-
liver a lecture on "Cooley as as
Territorial Demographer" in Aud.
A.
At the third lecture, March 18,
Prof. Philip Rieff of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania will speak
on "Cooley and Culture" in Aud.
A.
Prof. G. E. Swanson of the so-
ciology department at the Uni-
versity will conclude the series
with a lecture on "Human Na-
ture and the Search for a Nat-
uralistic Ethic" in Aud. A, April 8.
Charles Cooley is one of the
first names that a student taking
Sociology 100 at the University
encounters. His conception of pri-
mary groups as the basis of social
interaction is basic to sociology.
"Cooley was a withdrawn and
introspective man and he had few
friends," Prof. Robert Cooley An-
gell of the sociology department
and Cooley's nephew, said recent-
ly. Angell said he did not know
his uncle well as a young child,
but he became a student under
him at the University and Cooley
directed Angell's thesis.
Poor Lecturer
Angell remembers Cooley as a
poor lecturer, which he partially
attributes to his deafness but al-
so to his shyness and introversion.
His best teaching was done in
small seminars where he would
have the students submit questions
from the readings for discussion.
"My students are my eyes and
ears," Cooley often said.
Angell divides Cooley's philoso-
phy into two areas. First, Cooley
emphasizes the close link be-
tween psychology and sociology,
placing great importance on the
"mental character of society." He
once said that "man is social,

I
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i
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BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN
10 a~m. U p5m
Get your ticketsfor
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
N'GHT OF THE IGUANA
Feb. 4-6

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Thurs. $1.50 Fri., Sat. $1.75

J

Hall has constructed this por- proud to tell him. He resigne
trait from Frost's collected letters, cause of his pride.
his speeches, prose, anecdotes, and "I have tried to put all1
of course his poetry. The younger things in the play-the vane
New England poet has included his the man's character and the g
favorite Frost poems in the dia- ness of his poetry," Hall rema
Iogue--"To Earthward," "Desert Some Precedent
Places," "The Most of It" and
"Home Burial." Plays of this sort have
"Frost is often a black poet," precedent in the Americant
Hall said. His poetry is about tre, the foremost being "S
darkness, the despair. The image River," and "The World of
of him as a kindly old country Sandburg." But, Hall insisted
philosopher has been propagated is an experiment. The nar
by those who want to have a played by Staats Cotsworth
kindly old country philosopher. resents the inquiring mind o
America," reader. Although there is no
The "poet laureate of Atral plot, the play begins
as Frost has been called, regard- Frost's early life and his+
ed poetry as "occupational thera- works and goes through his d
py, Hall commented. With poe- ,Certain poems, the dialogue p
try he could make form out of like "Death of the Hired N
chaos, chaos which enveloped his will be enacted.
life. His own family life was - The setting is relatively s
tragic-out of six children, one Thexset ilel ves
died at birth, one at three, one and flexible. It will serve
during childbirth, one went in- platform for readers and
sane, and one committed suicide, stage for the dramatic poems.
'Vain Man' starkness of the set ref
"He was a vain man. The fame Frost's own New England I
he acquired meant a lot to him, scape.
for himself and for poetry," Hall Hall has been working cl

d be-
these
ety in
nreat-
nrked.
some
thea-
Spoon
Carl
, this
rator
lrep-
f the
cen-
with
early
eath.
oems
Man,"
mple
as a
as a
. The
flects
and-
osely

PROF. ROBERT C. ANGELL
"Cooley discards the earlier em-
phasis on heredity and clarifies
the environmental emphasis."
Angell called the second aspect
of Cooley's philosophy the organ-
is view, although others call it
functionalism. "By this Cooley,
meant everything is related to
everything else in a seamless web."
'U' Receives
Two Grants
The University has recently re-
ceived a grant from the National
Aeronautics and Space Adminis-
tration of $35,594. It will be used
for study of mathematical plot-
ting methods for analysis and
solution of problems related to
orbit and trajectory determina-
tion.
A grant of $20,000 has also been
received by the University from
the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foun-
dation to aid University planning
for a clinical facility for the men-
tally retarded, President Harlan
Hatcher has announced.

Read The Daily Classifieds

4

6

added.
The man walked miles every
day, Hall said. "That's why he
lived so long." He loved Ann Ar-
bor, and was even thinking of
spending his life here, but, as the
anecdote goes, when a new Uni-
versity president came in the '20's
and asked Frost in what capacity
he served here, Frost was too
Marketing Clo
Problems of S
By MARCY PELLY I

with the rehearsals, changing lines society. society is mental."
when necessary, cutting dialogue ----
that detracts from the poetry.
"Writing for the theatre is not 4
lonely, like writing a poem. It
has to be a communal effort," he T
said. TFH EH R 1R O MANOx/'UFF S
Tickets for "An Evening's Frost"Q
go on sale today at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Box Office. GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
T TAKE-OUT ORDERS
iss Studies
miall Firms * WIENER SCHNITZELS . . . . . .. 1.35 I
ness administration school. *8-oz. NEW YORK STRIP STEAK . . . 1.50
The class selected the problem
as one of their projects for the Both served with cho e of potatoes,
fall semester. salad, homemade roll, butter
After a while, the students dis-
covered that there was a problem
in the actual design of the cart. * Student Specials 95c 0 German reat Pattie 35c
Prof. Aarre K. Lahti of the archi-
tecture and design college sat 3p
on a class and brought the prob- 30OS. TWHAYER 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
lem back as a project for a paral- " 665-4967 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.
lel class in industrial design. They
developed a more modern, practi- CLOSED SUNDAY
cal design.
Such a combined Project has L di
several advantages. Dean Floyd A. -
Bond of the business administra-
tion school enumerated them:
"First, it's a student project, us-
Isurvey techniques in market GOOD TICKETS
research. Second it helps the de

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M"

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Where does a small company
turn for help in marketing a new
project if they can't afford a
consultant? For years, graduate
classes in market research in the
School of Business Administration
have been dealing with just this
type of problem .
A prime example is that of the
small Michigan company which
developed a new, very competitive
product-an electric cart for car-
rying personnel around a plant.
An executive of the company
had attended a businessman's ex-
tension course in Grand Rapids
sponsored by the University. He
thus spoke to his teacher, James
Pilcher, who referred him to Prof.
Alfred W. Swinyard, director of
the Bureau of BusinessdResearch.
Swinyard suggested that it
might be a suitable program for
the graduate market research
class, providing the company was
willing to be a guinea pig. The
exegitive agreed and made a pres-
entation to the class of Prof.
Donald R. G. Cowan of the busi-

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Graduation was only the beginning
of Jim Brown's education

velopment of Michigan industry.
And third, it represents a close
cooperation between two units at
the University."
Similarly, the executive vice-
president of the company wrote
Bond, "We sincerely appreciate
the help received from your fac-
ulty and students on this work."

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SEAN4CE
OW A WET
AFTERtNOGON

Because he joined Western Electric

I

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Jim Brown, Northwestern University, '62, came
with Western Electric because he had heard about
the Company's concern for the continued develop-
ment of its engineers after college graduation.
Jim has his degree in industrial engineering and
is continuing to learn and grow in professional
stature through Western Electric's Graduate Engi-
neering Training Program. The objectives and edu-
cational nhilosonhv of this Program are in the best

This training, together with formal college
engineering studies, has given Jim the ability to
develop his talents to the fullest extent. His present
responsibilities include the solution of engineer-
ing problems in the manufacture of moly-permal-
loy core rings, a component used to improve the
quality of voice transmission.
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