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January 30, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN D AILY

fiATTTR'.DAV eft _TAVVITM Ina-

Al

aAt'UJMJJAY, 311 JAi1UAKY 1965

i

BERKELEY RIOTS:
Claims Need of Speaker Ban

GOP Unity Battles Continue on Campuses

Collegiate Press Service
The national commander of the
American Legion has said that
the recent student demonstrations
on the University of California's
Berkeley campus indicate a need
fora ban on Communists speaking
at educational institutions.
The commander, Donald John- '
son, told 250 Legionnaires in Lodi,

California that the Berkeley
demonstrations were "an example
of defiance of our laws and abu-
sive actions against our peace of-
ficers."
Police arrested 801 demonstra-
tors on Dec. 2, following a sit-in
in the university's administration
building as a climax to months
of student protests against the

Across Campus

school's regulations governing po-
litical activity on campus.
"I think the recent events at
the University of California are
new evidence of the need for the
(Communist speaker) ban," John-
son said.
"Who is to deny that young
minds are impressionable, and
who would knowingly submit his
own children to the teachings of
a known Communist or one who is
thoroughly indoctrinated in Coin-
munits ideology?"
The student demonstrations are
closely tied to a drive by the
American Communist Party to
speak before high school, college
and university groups, he said.
The American Legion opposes
the appearance of "spokesmen for
the Communist conspiracy on tax-
supported properties," Johnson
said, "thus using these facilities
for sounding boards for Commun-
ist propaganda."
"There are all too many other
forums and facilities available to
Red-oriented speakers," he said.
The Berkeley demonstrations

By PAUL DANISH
Collegiate Press Service
National Republican disunity
may have been checked by the res-
ignation of Dean Burch as party
chairman, but the battle rages un-
abated on the campus-and withj
considerably more candor than on
the national level.
Professional GOP politicians de-
scribe the party's inner turmoil
with phrases such as "debate over
future policy" and "building party;
unity," but their campus counter-
parts view it more bluntly as a
fight for control between Repub-
lican liberals and conservatives.
Disputes between the two fac-
tions have flared into the open

get the members of the more con-
servative one to censure its offi-
cers.
At Queens, the leader of the
Goldwater supporters, Arthur Fin-
kelstein, charged that Young Re-
publican President John Mosshian
had arranged to have the club's
constitution amended in such a
way as to require prospective
members to appear before the
group's executive committee be-
fore they could be considered for
membership in it.
Kinkelstein's group lodged a for-
mal protest with Associate Dean
)f Students James R. Kreuzer, who
took no action on it, but indicat-

would admit that they were hold-
ing a meeting, insisting instead
that they were all there "to study."
Mosshian said the club was not
attempting to exclude any Repub-
lican, but is interested in protect-
ing itself from those who wc',d
"subvert" the organization. He
said membership in the club was
open to anyone as long as they
are Young Republicans first, and
they are Republicans in the tra-
dition of Lincoln, Roosevelt, Eisen-
hower and Bob Taft, Jr." He said
he didn't think people "like Strom
Thurmond are Republicans."
Finkelstein denied that his
group was trying to subvert the

student who was a member of ed to join, but according to Fin-
both organizations attempted to kelstein none of the YR members

Young Republicans, He said that
"we feel that we would be able to
strengthen it (the club) and that
we would be able to reinforce in
the Republican Club the principles
for which the Republican Party
has always stood. We feel that lib-
eral Republicans are better than
liberal Democrats, and the banner
of the Republican Party is big
enough to encompass all Republi-
cans."
The Queens incident was simi-
lar to incidents on two other cam-
puses this year-Temple Univer-
sity in Philadelphia and Colorado
State University - where Young
Republican dissidents attempted to
out pro-Goldwater officers. So far,
neither attempt has been success-
ful.

'Ij

PROF. ALFRED SWINYARD

Prof. Robert W. Parry of the
chemistry department has been
elected chairman of the American
Chemical Society Division of In-
organic Chemistry for 1965.
An authority on the chemistry
of compounds made up of hy-
drogen and boron, Parry was the
first editor of the Society publi-
cation, Inorganic Chemistry. A
member of the faculty since 1946,
he won the first ACS $1,000 Award
for Distinguished Service in the
Advancement of Inorganic Chem-
istry last year.
* * *
The I. . DuPont de Nemours
and Company, Wilmington, Del.,
has given four grants to the Uni-
versity totaling $21,700.
The awards, part of DuPont's
annual bid to education program
which this year totaled $1,800,000,
were divided between the chemis-
try department and the engineer-
ing college.
The largest of the four grants,
$10,000, was given to the chemis-
try department for fundamental
research in chemistry. A total of
$10,000 was given to the engineer-
ing college for fundamental re-
search-half to be in the area of
chemical engineering and half to
be applied to research in mechan-
ical engineering.
Prof. Eric R. Wolf of the an-
thropology department received a
Career Development Grant from
the National Institute of Mental
Health.
He will devote the next five
years to intensive research on
the social strategies of peasant
groups, alternating periods of field
work and writing with the presen-
tation of advanced seminars for
graduate students at the Univer-
sity.
Dr. Stefan S. Fajans, professor
of internal medicine in the Medi-
cal School, was awarded a visiting
faculty certificate by thedMayo
Graduate School of Medicine,
Rochester, Minn.
The certificate is one of some
10 presented annually to distin-
guished medical scientists who vis-
it the Mayo Clinic to address doc-
tors enrolled in the school's resi-
dency training program and to ex-
change ideas with clinic physi-
cians.
National Science Foundation
grants totaling $96,700 have been
made in support of research in
botany and psychology at the Uni-
versity.
Prof. Robert B. Zajonc of the
psychology department and pro-
gram director in the Research
Center for Group Dynamics, In-
stitute for Social Research, will
direct a three-year study of "So-
cial Facilitation and Inhibition"
with a $67,000 NSF grant.
Prof. Warren H. Wagner, Jr. of
the botany department and cura-
tor in the University Herbarium,
will direct a two-year study titled
"Evolutionary Characters and
Classification of the Filicineae"
with a $26,700 NSF grant.
Nearly 88 per cent ofthe class-
es at the University in which un-
dergraduate students are enrolled
have fewer than 35 students each.
Of the 29,103 students register-
ed at the University for the fall
term, 16,726 were undergraduates.
A total of 4,327 classes were or-
ganized for them. Of these classes,
18 per cent had fewer than 10 stu-
dents each, 37 per cent had from
11 to 20 students each, and 36
per cent had from 21 to 35 stu-
dents each.
* * *
How much of the money which
the state appropriates for the Uni-
versity is used for actual classroom
teaching?
According to a report issued on
the 1964-65 budget, three-fifths of
the General Funds budget (made
up of the state appropriation and
student fees) goes for "direct costs

of teaching."

PROF. ROBERT W. P
Among other items in t
et are plant operation a:
tenance, 11.5 per cent; li
per cent; student servi
cent; business operation
cent; general administr
per cent, and organized
5 per cent.
* * *
SATURDAY, JAN.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinemat
present Dostoyevsky's "T
at the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The speech de
will present the Universit
Production of Anton C
"Uncle Vanya" at the Ly
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-Musical So
tra Series Concert will fe
Berlin Philharmonic con
Herbert von Karajan, at1
SUNDAY, JAN. 3
4:30 p.m. - Leslie Br
bass baritone, will perfor
Recital Hall, School of Mi
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema C
present Dostoyevsky's "T
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-Earl Robinson
ally known composer-i
will present a concert at
Unitarian Church.
8:30 p.m.-School of Mi
pa Kappa Psi recital,
ture wind and percussio
ments at the Recital Ha
of Music Bldg.

are another example of the in-
creased civil disobedience and dis-
regard for law and order, accord-
ing to Johnson.
"The American Legion deplores
and opposes the action of any
groups or individuals who would
try to dictate our way of life by
taking the law into their own
hands or by acting lawlessly," he
said.
'ARRY "Recent stories about police
brutality on the Berkeley campus
his budg- have been used as a rallying point
nd main- by people who advocate civil dis-
braries, 5 obedience," Johnson continued.
ce, 6 per "Those involved in the demonstra-
, 3.6 per tions showed absolutely no respect
ation, 1.3 for the law, but at the same time
research, demanded full sanction of their
actions."
Johnson said that although he
3Q did not visit the Berkeley campus,
Guild will he had talked with many of the
'he Idiot" university's faculty members, stu-
dents and administrators.
"The students I talked to had
partment very little reaction of any sort
y Players to the demonstrations," Jonson
hekhov's said. "They seemed far more con-
dia Men- cerned about their studies, but
they were very disturbed by the
ciety Ex- fact that many of their classes
ature the had been canceled during the
ducted by demonstrations."'
Hill Aud. "I found that the recent grad-
1 uates of the university were the
ones who were most disturbed by
eidenthal, the events on the Berkeley cam-
m at the pus," Johnson said. "These young
usic Bldg. people are just entering the pro-
Guild will fessional world, where good imagesi
'he Idiot" are so important, and they arei
realizing it for the first time in
, nation- their lives."
balladeer, The students who participated!
the First in the demonstrations "will live
to regret it," he said.
usic Kap- "The students now realize thlt
will fea- their arrest will be on their rec-
n instru- ords for life. It will be particularly
11, School harmful to them when they apply
for jobs-especially civil cerivice.'
t1 W7

.Probe State
Economic
Expansion
By MARCY PELLY
What should be involved in a
state economic development pro-!
gram? What actually is involved?
Is there any difference between
the two? This issue is the
heart of the main current project
of the Bureau of Business Re-
search.I
To find out, the Bureau has
developed a three-pronged pro-1
gram: field investigations in var-
ious states with economic develop-
ment programs; empirical analy-
sis of the economic growth in
these states; and a series of con-
ferences for and with persons
working on industrial development
in Michigan.
The field work, under the lead-
ership of Henrik Helmers, involv-
ed "a rather intensive study of
the industrial development pro-
grams of thirty-six states," Prof.
Alfred W. Swinyard, director of
the bureau noted. Last summerI
alone there were nine people out
doing field research.
Swinyard explained that in
some areas almost the entire ef-
fort is devoted to trying to attract
new plants with such enticements
as free plants, or special tax ad-
vantages. In Michigan, the De-
partment of Economic Expansion
is "oriented to a more basic kind
of industrial growth and to try-
ing to foster this growth." They
are "working with existing :n-
dustry to see that an area has a
satisfactory environment for in-
dustry to prosper."
James Vader is in charge of
the empirical analysis of the data,I
and William J. Carey, associateI
director of the bureau is handling
conference activities.j
SAlready, twothree-day confer-
ences have been held, to help
develop active programs for Mich-
igan communities. A third con-
ference will be held sometime in
March to acquaint program work-
ers with the findings of the
project.
The aim of the project is "to
help the Michigan economy, to
provide more jobs and to help
increase the per capita income
so that in general we have a
healthy, growing economy," Swin-
yard said.

The latest two examples of this
have occurred at Queens College
in New York and San Fernando
Valley State College in California,
where liberals and conservatives
are openly fighting for control of
campus GOP machinery.I
At Queens, student supporters of
Sen. Barry Goldwater's unsuccess-
ful presidential bid have charged
that they are being unfairly ex-
cluded from membership in the
campus Young Republican Club.
They have also accused the club's
leaders of failure to support the
national ticket.
At San Fernando State, the sit-
uation is more complicated. Two
student Republican organizations
are functioning at the school, one
apparently representing the con-
servatives and the other represent-
ing the moderate and liberal ele-
ments. The dispute flared when a
Add Class on
rO
Water Safety
Students completing the new
drownproofing course being of-
fered by the physical education
department should be able to stay
afloat for as longbas 12 to 14
hours, Howard C. Leibee, director
of the Physical Education for Men
Service (Required) Program, said
recently.
The physical education depart-
ment added drownproofing and
ice skating to their program for
the winter semester.
In drownproofing, students are
instructed in the Georgia Tech
method of staying afloat, a way of
combining arm and leg motions
with a precise breathing technique
in such a way that anyone can
stay up for hours and swim miles,
Leibee said.
The class meets for one hour
Tuesdays and Thursday at 3 p.m.
in the Sports Bldg. pool. The
course is basically designed for
nonswimmers but is open to all
male students. Drownproofing is
being offered on an experimental
basis, Leibee added, "to see if
students are interested."
JAimed at beginning and inter-
mediate skaters, ice skating is not
a new course but has been offered
in the past only when ice time was
available. Ice skating is being of-
fered this semester at the Univer-
sity ice rink on Mondays from 10
to 12 and on Wednesdays from 10
to 12. Students interested in elect-
ing either course may do so in
Rm. 4, Waterman Gym.

i

Mosshian said there were no
such constitutional amendments,
but that the club had adopted
such provisions as "rules, regula-
tions, and procedures."
Prior to the adoption of the
procedures, conservatives had been
joining the Queens Young Repub-
licans at the rate of two or three
a week. When they learned of the
new rules, however, they appeared
at a club meeting en masse. YR
afficers immediately adjourned the
meeting.
The group held a meeting the
following day, at which time the
conservative group again attempt-

w

on at least four campuses this
year, and are going on quietly on ,ed tthe would turn the matter
a number of othrs.over to the student cout.

v=

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A

2nd Week
WALT DISNEY'S
;ACHIEVEMENT!-'

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of the Poet
by Donal Hal

JULIE ' DICK
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Week Day Matinees $1.25

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Committee 1 E0xamine
Fair Trial, Free Press

4

IFC PRESENTS

An 11-member committee of at-
torneys and journalists has been
named "to try to find a way of
easing the conflict between pro-
tection of the individual's right to
a fair trial and freedom of the
press to present facts and com-
ments" in Washtenaw County.
The announcement was made
yesterday by the Washtenaw
County Bar Association President
John R. Hathaway, who asked the
11 men to serve on the committee.
Hathaway said he "will work
with the committee to help see
that its research has the broadest
possible entry into the legal and
law enforcement activities of this
county."
The committee includes Fred
Steingold of the Institute of Con-
tinuing Legal Education at the
University. He is the committee
secretary.
Other University personnel on
the committee are Profs. Paul
Kauper, Samuel Estep and Jer-
old Israel of the Law School.
Also on the committee is Prof.
Dean C. Baker of the journalism
department.
The organization of the commit-
tee was prompted by a series of
editorials in Washtenaw County
and in the surrounding areas con-
cerning "procedure now being used

by the law enforcement agencies
and the legal propriety of actions
taken by prosecuting attorneys,
courts and lawyers involved in
proceedings against persons accus-
ed of crimes," Hathaway said.
"If we ignore some fundamental
misunderstandings and misinfor-
mation, these editorials raise the
question of fair trial versus free
press."
The conflict thus presented is
"clear and urgent," and it "can-
not be ignored or avoided." Two
of the most critical ingredients
that go to make up our modern
democracy are apparently in directr
opposition."
Hathaway said that because of
this he had arranged for the com-
mittee study in his capacity as
county bar president.

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AND LEAVES HIM LIMPI BNy CrTer,
"See just how exciting and compelling a motion
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KIM STANLEY and
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JOSH

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Matinees $1.00-Evenings & Sunday $1.25
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