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January 07, 1965 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-07

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PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, 7 JANUARY 1965

PAGE TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, 7 JANUARY 1965

-_

REPUBLICAN LEADERSHIP:
Ford Moves Up to Front of GOP Ranks

FLINT COLLEGE:
Plans Still Same Despite
Urge To Stop Growth

New WSU and Tech
Heads Plan Expansion

(Continued from Page 1)
publican machinery would result
without a change in party lead-
ership.
The basic diference in organi-
zation sought by the rebelling
representatives was less "leader-
ship by cabal." A wider leadership
base was desired that would give
junior members an opportunity to
put their talents to work for the
party. In short, the revolt was
largely one against Halleck's style
of leadership.
Congressman Charles A. Mosh-
er of Ohio summed up the hopes
of the supporters of Ford. "Ford
has a more effective personality,
greater willingness to consider
new ideas and leadership tech-
niques," he stated in a recent in-
terview. Others questioned about
the reasons for ousting Halleck
commented that any change
would contribute to the creation
of a new image for the Republi-
can Party, a necessity for a come-
back in the 1966 elections.
Improve Situation
Many Republican congressmen
believe that Halleck has been re-
miss in his defense of the minor-
ity party's rights. For example,
complaints are vehement regard-
ing the lack of minority staffing
on congressional committees. Hal-
leck has made no move to improve
the situation in the past.
Still, an Illinois supporter of the
Indiana leader stated the belief
that Halleck was "an outstanding
leader in that he represents the
feelings of his followers and re-
sponds to their needs and de-
mands." That Halleck might have
yielded to demands to make more
use of recently elected members
was indicated by one of his aides
two days before his defeat. "If
Halleck wins, he will go along with
the dissidents' suggestions," the
lieutenant declared.
Support for Ford defies cate-
gorization on ideological or geo-
graphical bases. Philosophically,
his backers range from extremely
conservative W. R. (Doc) Hull, Jr.
(Mo) to Silvio Conto (Mass), who
was nominated by both Republi-
cans and Democrats last year. An

administration assistant to one of
Ford's campaign managers stated
that Ford received support from
every state having -Republican
congressmen.
Conservative Credentials
Robert Griffin (Mich) and
Charles Goodell (NY) headed up
a team of about 12 primary and
15 secondary supporters of the
Grand Rapids Republican. Espe-
cially helpful in . swaying Gold-
waterites was Tom Curtis. His
conservative credentials are un-
impeachable and his arguments
were convincing as to the need to
replace Halleck in order to get
significant reorganization.
Among the secondary Ford
backers was Joe Martin (Mass),
the man whom Halleck beat for
the post of minority leader in
1958 by a mere four votes.
Six votes separated Ford and
Halleck. The close vote was un-
expected by the Ford camp. They
had counted on about a 15 vote
difference. That Halleck was able
to come so close to retaining his
job is a testiment to 30 years of
accumulated favors for fellow Re-
publicans. Halleck also received
almost solid support from "Gold-
water conservatives." Apparently
they saw any change as being a
slap at their leader, although
Ford did support Goldwater dur-
ing the last election.
Six or Seven Years Ago
In addition, several congress-
men remembered that Ford had
objected to private bills that they
had introduced some six or seven
years ago. Since the bills required
ounanimous consent, Ford's ob-
jection had killed them.
Another base of support for Hal-
leck came from the present House
leadership. Such men as Bob Wil-
son of California, chairman of the
Republican Campaign Committee
and Les Arends of Illinois, party
whip, rounded up colleagues in
their states in order to try to
keep their jobs. Wilson seems safe,
but Arends is in a more precar-
ious position.
Traditionally the minority lead-
er has, in effect, chosen the party
whip; Halleck chose Arends in
1958. That a new leader would

reward a backer with the post of
whip has been accepted practice.
This year, however, a chance
exists that Arends may retain the
whipship. One of Halleck's back-
ers said he believed that it would
make party unity easier to achieve.
A staffman of one of Ford's sup-
porters added that "Arends has
been pretty efficient" while not-
ing that the whip does not play
a large policy role.
East or West
Nevertheless, it is more likely
that a person will be named from
either the East or the West Coast
because otherwise the Eastern
congressmen would be without
representation in the party hier-
archy while the Western repre-
sentatives would have only Wil-
son. Although Congressman Good-
ell claims that he does not want
to be whip, odds are good that
someone like him will get the nod,
that is, an East Coast moderate.
Another .battle occurred for the
post of Republican Conference
(caucus) leader which Ford va-
cated. About a week after Ford
announced he would seek the
minority leadership, Melvin Laird
of Wisconsin sent a letter to his
colleagues stating that he was
seeking the position. This arrived
right before Christmas. Until last
Sunday night there was no serious
opposition for the Monday morn-
ing election. That night at the
Washington home of Ogden Reid
(NY) the Wednesday Club met
to discuss the situation. They
were dissatisfied with Laird be-
cause of his role as Platform
Chairman at the Republican Con-
vention last summer and his overt
identification with Goldwater.
Paul Fino (NY) had earlier an-
nounced his intention to challenge
Laird, but even his own delegation
considered his candidacy a joke.
Fino is the one who is constantly
proposing a national lottery and
is considered a "nut" by many.
Clearly he did not stand a chance
of winning.
Peter Frelinghuysen, a recent
member of the Wednesday Club
emerged as the opposition candi-
date with the best chance. He is
more conservative than most of

the group's members and is a long
time member of Congress.
Without campaigning, he gar-
nered 62 votes to Laird's 75. Re-
publican moderates considerbd
this a moral victory, since the
membership of the Wednesday
Club is only 22. Frelinghuysen
should not be thought of as the
Wednesday Club candidate, how-
ever. As Congressman Mosher, a
member who attended the Sunday
evening meeting, said, "It was just
by chance that his candidacy orig-
inated w i t h the Wednesday
group."
When asked the previous Thurs-
day why the moderates had not
yet put forth an opposition candi-
date, one midwestern moderate
said they could not find one. Fre-
linghuysen returned to Washing-
ton from a vacation on Sunday.
As Congressman Brad Morse .of
Massachusetts stated Monday af-
ternoon, "Given three more hours
and we might have won." Many
of Frelinghuysen's supporters did
not hear of his candidacy until
the caucus Monday morning.
Two Wisconsin GOP'ers
Besides dissatisfaction w i t h
Laird's conservative ideology and
his role as platform chairman, op-
position arose because two of the
top GOP leadership posts would
be filled by Wisconsin Republicans
if Laird won. John Byrnes of
Green Bay is chairman of the
Republican Policy Committee. Al-
though the two Wisconsin repre-
sentatives like to think of them-
selves as "representatives of the
Midwest," many Republican con-
gressman rebelled against the pro-
posed consolidation of power in
the five member delegation of
Wisconsin.

(Continued from Page 1)
versity at Houghton was advised
to postpone its addition of two
more years to the curriculum at
their Sault Ste. Marie campus.
Present plans-continuing despite
the report-call for this addition
to be completed by the fall of 1965.
The Davis report outlined some
of the issues and arguments at
stake in the branch controversy.
Pro
On the pro-branch side, the
committee said that such an in-
stitution can:
-Win immediate accreditation;
--Attract students, faculty and
funds with the reflected prestige
of the parent institution;
-Use the advice of its parent
in. getting started;
-Be administered more eco-
nomically;
-Enjoy a ready-made local
alumni group to help in fund-
raising, and
-"Aid the parent institution to
fulfill its sense of obligation,
strengthen its program and win
support for itself."
Short-Run Benefits
But the committee found these
to be "reasons of short duration"
relevant only when the branch is
new, and concluded that "in most
cases, in a highly developed soph-
isticated state such as Michigan,
autonomy is desirable from the be-
ginning." Among the points in
favor of independent new colleges:
-Branches may arouse fears
among other institutions that the

parent school is "empire-building,"
which may lead them to open
their own branches "indiscrimi-
nately";
-Branches may compete un-
fairly with community colleges
and other independent institu-
tions and curtail their develop-
ment;
-Faculty and students there
may feel isolated from the parent
institution;
-The branch may lure people
on the "false basis" of reflected
prestige rather than on its own
merits;
L --An autonomous college, hav-
ing an independent administration)
all its own, will be better run and
will command more respect in the
community;
-Having a state system of au-
tonomous colleges yields more di-
versity than a system of branches;
-An autonomous school must
achieve its own excellence;
-It can get assistance from all
state schools, not just one, and
-"It will contribute a sense of
venturesomeness which will be ap-
pealing to faculty and administra-
tion."
The Davis report added that
"occasionally circumstances may
arise in which a branch institu-
tion must be created. Even where
this condition exists, however, the
committee believes that the best
long-run development will occur
if a process of gradual independ-
ence is contemplated from the be-
ginning."

(Continued from Page 1)
big state universities.
However, Keast asserted that
although his vision of three eq;al-
ly great state universities would
entail higher proportional appro-
priations to WSU than has been
traditional, he did not intend to
deprive the other state universities
from their fair share of state
funds.
He noted, "Although WSU has
many assets, it is not yet in the
University's class. We are going'
to try to be, and it costs money."
Smith, former head of Tech's
department of metallurgical engi-
neering, also predicts expansion of
his institution.
Tech, which now has an en-
rollment of 3600, expects a student
body of 9000 by 1975. Smith hopes
to expand Tech's graduate pro-
grams, and its division of con-
tinuing education.
Also, a liberal arts college will
be established on the Houghton
campus in 1965. Smith pointed out
that this college will be establish-
ed to give engineers "a greater
realization of the sociological and
economic effect of their work,"
through its course offerings. Also,
according to Smith, liberal arts

students could obtain a better
idea of the scientific world by
being on the same campus as the
engineering school.
The new Michigan Tech presi-
dent noted that although his
school has previously offered lib-
eral arts courses to engineers, the
establishment of the new school
will attract a top notch liberal
arts faculty at Houghton.
Keast, who will succeed Clar-
ence B. Hilberry as president of
WSU by July 1, was a Phi Beta
Kappa at the University of Chi-
cago. He received his doctorate
degree from Chicago in 18th cen-
tury literature.
An author of three books, Keast
joined the Cornell faculty in 1951.
In his tenure at Cornell, Keast
rose from English professor to
dean of the liberal arts college in
January 1962 and vice-president
for academic affairs in September
1963.
Smith succeeded Dr. J. R. Van
Pelt as president of Tech on Jan.
1. After receiving his B.S. degree
in mining engineering at the Uni-
versity of Alaska, Smith earned
a Ph.D. in metallurgical engi-
neering at the University of Penn-
sylvania.

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SABBATH
SERVICES
Resume Friday,
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at 7:30 p.m.
B'nai Brith HILLEL Foundation
also, see P. 3

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Milkmaid Hand and Body Lotion
Reg. $4.00 .

... $2.00
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Dorothy Gray Lipstick.............2 for $1.00

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W.A.A. Folk Dance Club
presents
FLK DNCIN
Every Friday-8-10:30 p.m.
Women's Athletic Bldg.
L nstruction and Refreshments

The U. of M.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
MASS MEETING,
Sun., Jan. 10,1965.. 7:30 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
for "Yeomen of the Guard"

let -o- Fish ......24c"
riple Thick Shakes .. 20c
elicious Hamburgers 15c

Dorothy Gray Dry Skin Lotion
Reg. $2.00 ... .

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Revlon Intimate Lotion
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Reg. $2.40 .

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Fi
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Shocking Spray
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