100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 21, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 21, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILI SATURDAY. MAY 21. 1966

Music

Circus': Silly Film

Oehs: Pop.wTop. to LSD Blues

By LESLIE FISH
First, Phil Ochs is a pretty bad
folksinger. His flat, heavy voice,
best adapted for Blues, is loaded
with Pop empty affectations.
"I used to sing along with the
radio . . . Elvis, Buddy Holly. I
got my voice to go along with
them," he says; but what fit
Elvis didn't fit Ochs.
His guitar playing is a droning
monotony of heavy, featureless
flatpick slam only rarely colored
by painfully deliberate "3-finger"
picking.
But Ochs as a songwriter is
something else again. The mark-
able thing is that for all his grudg-
ing respect for Dylan ". . . he made
it by straddling two mainstreams")
and his arrogant misconceptions
of folkmusic ". . . it didn't pro-
duce any real creative artists with-
in the idiom; either PP&M types,
or rehash artists like Doc Wat-
son. . ."), Ochs is definitely mov-
ing in the same direction that
Dylan took two years ago.
Like Dylan, Ochs began on
"Folkmusic with a touch of Pop"
(as his tunes and harmonies re-
veal), as a straight "Topical Sing-
er," a propagandist. Now he's
shifting into subjective symbol-
ism.
Ochs is now where Dylan was
on his third album.
In his worse songs he's clinched
in phrase, sloppy in fitting words(

By JOHN JAROSH]
"The Circus," a 1928 Chaplin
film having its revival at the Cin-
ema Guild, is outlandishly silly
rather than exceedingly hilarious.
However, this silliness acquires'
such an extra-ordinary resonance'
throughout, that the film escapes
depicting a mere farce.
It was inevitable that sooner or
later Chaplin should join the cir-
cus. These pale-faced clowns who;
wander round the ring with their
putty noses, disconsolate expres-
sions, and jesters' rags, are after
all Chaplin's brothers.
Almost from the very beginning
and when he appears as a clown,
Chaplin is believable, but as a
tight-rope walker in a morning
coat he is gleefully beyond belief.
Aside from the cold calculation
and elaborate chill that runs
through it, "The Circus" is re-
markably homogeneous and rather
deftly constructed. In all aspects
"The Circus" seems to display the
classic unities. It tells a single
story in a single place at a single
time. Actually no real plot is evi-
dent because none ever existed.
The film is a succession of var-
ied fast-moving incidents and a
number of subtle themes that are
interwoven, compounded, blithely
torn apart, for other more mirth-
ful themes immediately take their
place.
Chaplin's actions are performed
as a conjuror might play them.
The rabbits disappear, monkeys
and lions come from nowhere,-the
conjuror's patter continually mis.
leads, and his baleful eye senses
the hoped-for reaction from the
audience.
It is the wholly credible nature
of the setting that makes it nec-
essary to use silly ingenuities, hap-
py inventions and clear, sharp im-
ages. To create a balance between
the magical forces controlled by
Chaplin and the magical forces
of the circus, the film was com-

promised. The lion he is confront-
ed with is a sleepy lion with no
lust for human flesh and the
clowns are seriously incompetent.
The pathos of this film is con-
scious and deliberate. Chaplin is
at times humorously lost in his
famous mannerisms. Chaplin even
looks as though he's tired of the
whole weary weight of the world.
Chaplin joins a circus by the
purest accident, staying long
enough to turn it upside down
and to insure the marriage of the
little equestrienne (Merna Kenne-
dy). The circus then moves on
with Chaplin left behind in the
bleak glare of the morning sun.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
India Student's Association, A film,
"'Gumrah," May 21, 7 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
* ' *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
services at 10:30 a.m., Sun., May 22.
Supper at 5 p.m., followed by speaker
at 5:35 p.m. Prof. Philip C. Best:
"What's Ahead in the Social Sciences?"
7 p.m. Devotions.
Newman Student Association, Picnic,
May 22, 1:30 p.m., 331 Thompson.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture-discussion (informal), 7:30 p.m.,
3rd fI. Union.
I --masame

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWITTi"EN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, MAY 21
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Decision Making: Rational-Crea-
tive": Rackham Amphitheatre, 8:30 a.m.
Baseball - U-M vs. Michigan State
University: Ferry Field, 1 p.m.
High School French Horn Ensemble
Concert-Hill Aud., 4 p.m.
Events Sunday
No Events Scheduled.
Events Monday
VOICE-SDS Summer School: Twen-
tieth Century Revolution, Laurie Lip-
son will speak on "The Algerian Revo-
lution," Mon., May 23, 8 p.m., Room
3G, Michigan Union.
General Notices
VOICE-SDS: General membership
meeting; discussion of the student
movement-where it came from and
where it's going. Plans for summer
program, Tues., May 24, 8 p.m., Room
3G, Michigan Union.
Doctoral Examination for Ergun Ar,

Mathematics; thesis: "On the Helmholtz
Equation for an Acoustically Rigid
Scatterer," Mon., May 23, 3231 Angell
F all, at 3 p.m. Chairman, G. W. Hed-
strom.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Reed College Master of Arts in
Teaching Program, Portland, Ore. -
Federally sponsored fellowships for
teaching internship for liberal arts
grads interested in preparing to teach
in inner city high schools. Internship
designed to provide fellows with exper-
ience in being of service to disadvan-
taged students, leading to basic certifi-
cation and Master of Arts in Teaching.
Applications now being accepted, forms
sent upon request.
POSITION OPENINGS:
WBFO-FM Educational Radio Service,
Buffalo, N.Y.-Chief engineer desired to
recruit, train, and supervise student
studio operators, knowl. of standard
broadcast equipment, on the air pro-
cedures and have interest in educa-

tional broadcasting. Must have first
class FCC license,
General Foods Corp., Kanakee, Ill.-
Openings for Project Engineers and
Production Supervisors. Recent grads
with little or no experience, degree in
engineering preferred, Young men who
desire to go into management with
maximum opportunities for assuming
responsibility in labor relations, sched-
uling, quality control, renovation.
Management Consultants - Three
openings: 1. Gulf Coast. Mechanical
Engineer, degree in same required, with
experience in Ethlyene plant operation,
company is leader in Petrochemical In-
dustry. 2. City .in Mid-Atlantic state.
Chief Process Engineer, grad in Chem.
Engrg. Sexeral years exper. in. process
engineering and plant involvement in a
:hemical or refinery operation. Company
is leader in Petrochemical Industry. 3
New York City. Assistant to manager,
petrochemical manufacturing, grad
chem. engineer with about 5 yrs. ex-
per. In chemical industry.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

,f I

4

HELD
OVER!
DIA
ACADEMY
WINN
BEST SUPPORTI N
MARTIN BA
HARRELL RE~FS f - lo
Released thruNITED ARTISTS

L 8-6416
AWARD
ER
N G ACTOR
LSAM

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
PHIL OCHS is shown in concert

to line and rhyme, foggy in imag-
ery and clumsy in melody and
rhythm.
"Joe Hill" and "Chaplains of
the War" are sloppy yamp. But
Ochs at his best is an eerie blend
of hallucinegenic imagery, terse
clarity, sharp observation, and
some brilliant satire in a flam-
ence-Blue idiom with touches of

Folk-Rock (like the Kafkaesque
"Trials," or Freudian "Crucifix-
ion Heroes").
His best to date is "The
Party," which even gets in an
ironic kick at himself, showing
that humor may save him yet.
"The big question facing the
20th century is: 'Will Death Bring
You Down?'" Thinking this way,
he may reveal as much talent as
Dylan.
"I'm just a writer, a recorder
of sense impressions, political and
social vibrations," says Ochs; and
on this self-appraisal he may well
be right.

VILDLY COMIC
YOU SHOULD
CERTAINLY
SEE ITI"
-N.Y. times
IS.

1

Dial
662-6264

SHOWS START AT
100-3:00-5:00
7:00 and 9:05

Spring, Loren Save Judith',
Western with A Difference

Ike supreme suspense of a woman wronged beyond words, almost beyond revenge.,,,.

SOPHIA LOREN
114 JIT

By JOHN ALLEN
At certain times of the year it
is enough to say of a movie, by
way of recommendation, that So-
phia Loren is in it. Fortunately for
"Judith," now at the State Thea-
tre, it is that time of year.
The latest Loren film has neith-
er the poignancy of "Two Women"
nor the lightheartedness of
"Houseboat." It lacks a few other
things, as well, but it does have
Miss Loren, and that should satis-
fy all but the most serious of film-
goers.
In all fairness it must be ad-
mitted that it is a novel exper-
ience to watch a typical Western
when the setting is not Fort Apa-
che but the Gates of Galilee Kib-
butz-and when the settlers and
Indians turn out to be Jews and
Arabs. It is more than a novel
experience; it is good intellectual
exercise: Just how many stand-
ard gimmicks can you recognize
beneath the kibbutz clothing?
There is a certain type of West-
ern which goes something like
this: into a community of settlers
comes a strong, hard woman, bent
on getting even with the no-good
snake who done her wrong. He is
the common enemy of the com-
munity as well, having sold guns
to the Indians. The women, and
the community, for different rea-
sons, have a common goal: re-
venge.
s always, the juxtaposition of
a personal vendetta motif upon
the pattern of society seeking its
own, leads to conflict among the
Good Guys before the Bad Guy is
snatched away from the Chief's
tepee and the final battle scene
can get under way. If it is a more
or less contemporary Western, it
ends without a sunset and without
final victory-but with a thick
aura of hope mixed generously in-
to the clearing smoke of battle.
"Judith" is just such a Western,
though it happens to be set in the
Middle East.
If you are not opposed to watch-
ing Westerns with a difference,
"Judith" is good exercise in the
L OOKIG
FORIA
UMMER
S
JOB?

construction of mental parallelo-
grams. It is true that the rather
corny plot is only thinly disguis-
ed, but then the garb of a kib-
butz worker doesn't exactly alter
Miss Loren beyond all recogni-
tion, either.
You might keep score while you
watch the film: one point forI
every intentional resemblance to a
Hollywood Western you definitely
recognize. Thirty or better is just,
passing. No points for recogniz-
ing Miss Loren, however - unless
you consider that the whole point
in the first place.
Ph. 483-4680
64&an"c On CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
wI
Shown at
25 and 11:50
ai
ALSO
Shown at 10:20 only
"SKY DIVERS" IN COLOR
2 COLOR CARTOONS

r,
.. .. t
ri.

. S- Z f

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3,
5, 7 and 9 P.M.

I

I

I.

U R
i i
TON IGHT
I
* /
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR:
I /
I CHARLIE CHAPLIN
i
I /
First Showing in Ann Arbor
ia
1 I.
i' Starring
* I
CHARLIE CHAPLI N & BUSTER KEATON
* /
1 I
SHORT: "THE HEART OF JENNIE"
with HAROLD LLOYD
'TIEcii
I IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
IN -
i ~ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
1 /
----------- mmm-mm-mmmm.m.mn

1

I

I

'RUSSELLW

I

44ag$ey
'MILL

Launch an Exciting Career as an

"A FILM
OF WARMTH
AND LAUGHTER
to enjoy and
remember with
pleasure!"
-N.Y. Daily News

V#he
1dvWEictr

Intelligence
Specialist

Il, f
- ra
-
. f
\ " .+ . ,
' ,
----- '

ArtCarved settings
hold a diamond so delicately,
it's almost frightening.

Comprehensive Career Development Plan for College Graduates Helps You Grow
Swiftly into Positions of Responsibility and Exceptional Challenge.

. \ 4
/ 1
/ I
e
pet
o the4
wo won't

1
ve even designed a diamond
nt ring to resemble the softfragile
als of a new spring flower.
diamond you show ONf to the

Michigan
Albion-Scott Tuthill, Jeweler
Alpena-Rene's Jewelry
Ann Arbor-Daniel's Jewelry Co.
Bad Axe-Sageman Jewelry
Battle Creek-
Roy S. Bailey, Jeweler
Battle Creek-Miller's Jewelers
Battle Creek-Young's Jewelers
Coro-Wm. Manasse
Detroit--Rose Jewelry
Detroit-Sollan, Inc.
Flint-Hatfield Jewelers
Grand Rapids-
Herkner Jewelry Co.
Greenville-Faber's Jewelry
Hamtramck-Max's Jewelry
Hancock-Miller Jewelry
lronwood-John Albert Jewelry
Kalamazoo-
Carl V. Reck, Jeweler
Kalamazoo-Walter E. Ring
Kamalazoo-Shumaker's Jewelers
Lapeer-Acheson Jewelers
Ludington-Schohl Jewelry
Marquette-Nyquist Jewelry
Monroe-Best Jewelers
Mount Pleasant-
Thompson's Jewelry
Muskegon-Marvin Jewelers
Muskegon-Parmelee's Jewelry
Owosso-Campbells Jewelry
Oxford-Acheson Jewelers
Royal Oak-Myer's Jewelry Shop
St. John-Lester Lake Jeweler
St. Joseph-Green's Jewelry
Soginaw-Nuechterlein Jewelry

The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is a
unique, independent organization serving diverse in-
telligence requirements of the Department of Defense.
We are active in many areas directly or indirectly
related to national security ... analyzing not only
purely military conditions, trends and forces, but
also pertinent economic, social, cultural, physical,
geographic and scientific factors.
Each year we seek out qualified individuals for
DIA's entry level Career Development Plan. This is
a program designed both to equip you for a responsi-
bk and challenging permanent career position, and
enable you to complete most or all requirements for
an advanced degree.

THREE-MONTH ORIENTATION COURSE
All college graduate recruits attend a three-month
Intelligence Orientation Course. Its objectives are to
orient the trainee to the Department of Defense gen-
erally and the Defense Intelligence Agency specifi-
cally, with particular emphasis on the role of civilian
analysts in the military intelligence community.
Following completion of this course, trainees are
assigned to substantive areas of work related to their
disciplines. At the beginning of the second year, you
will be selected for a specific assignment leading to a
position as permanent member of the work force.
OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCED STUDY
All trainees are eligible for educational programs
leading to advanced degrees. These opportunities-
plus many additional training opportunities-may
be provided either during or after normal working
hours (or both).
You will find that the advantages of a career at DIA
are many and varied, including the liberal fringe
benefits associated with Federal employment. Our
locations (the Pentagon and nearby Arlington, Va.)
afford your choice of city, suburban or country living
... and a wealth of recreational, cultural, historical
and educational attractions are within a few min-
utes' drive.
And by no means least, you will derive much satis-
faction from contributing personally to the achieve-
ment of vital national objectives.
VISIT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE NOW
.fro f,,rt,erinformation ahut DIA career nnor-

N.
.3

1966-67 DIA College Program
for BA/BS, MA/MS Graduates in

Area Studies
China
Far East
Latin America
Southeast Asia
USSR
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Economics
Electronic Engineering
Forestry
Geography

Geology
Library Science
Mathematics (majors, minors)
Meteorology
Nuclear Physics
Pedology
Photogrammetry
Photo-Interpretation
Physics
Public Health
Structural Engineering
Transportation
Urban Planning

only be dazzling. But elegant too.

In the new ArtCarved collection,
y u can choose from slim, soaring, majestic
desians. And without beina briahtenedL

As is evident from the list above, there are career
_ . ... ., ,..ea .ii ®A .- i1cY ll" 19PQ !]' /

II

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan