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May 13, 1966 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-13

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FRIDAY, MAY 1, x.966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F1~IDAY, iWAY 13, 1966 TIlE IIHCIHGAN DAILY

rL £U.

'M' Nine Faces

Two Foes in

Title Bid

ONLY HOME MEET:
Cindermen Host Ohio,
Chicago Track Club.

By BETSY COHN
The Wolverine baseball team
will put its. perfect Big Ten rec-
ord on the line this weekend when
it faces the Hawkeyes in a sin-
gle game in Iowa City today and
then travels to Minneapolis for a
doubleheader against the strong
Minnesota nine.
The Iowa Hawkeyes are gazing
optimistically at their last big
home sports weekend when they
will face the Wolverines.
Michigan Wolverines are star-
ing back with a record as the
league leader at 7-0. Iowa is now
tied for sixth place in the con-
ference at 3-4 after dropping three
games to unbeaten Minnesota last
weekend.
"This is the year," according to
Dick Schultz, assistant coach,
"when sophomores must come
through as pitchers if Iowa is to
develop into a Big Ten title con-
tender."
Solid Hitting
In areas, other than pitching,
Iowa seems well-equipped. The in-
field has Co-Captain Mickey Mos-
es, the top hitter of 1965 (.393)
Steve Hirko and Frank Renner,
both with .500 averages. Donn
Haugen and Renner are two of the
top Iowa pitchers posting ERA's
of 2.12 and 2.21, respectively.
The tough guy of the Hawk-
eye pitching staff will be Bob
Schauenberg, the hurler who broke
the Big Ten season's record in
1965 with an ERA of 0.28 in 32 /
innings pitched. Schauenberg was
also one of the losing pitchers
against Minnesota last weekend
when the Gophers gnawed their
way into Iowa's title hopes with
three straight victories.
Coach Vogel, who has been with
the team since 1925, has carried
the Hawkeyes through nine Vic-
tories over Michigan and 29 losses.
Two Big Ones
Also this weekend, the two un-
defeated teams of Michigan and
Minnesota will vie to blemish each
other's record as the two meet for
a doubleheader, Saturday, in Min-
neapolis.
The games will be crucial in
determining Michigan's chances
4 for, the Big Ten Championship.
Despite their unbeaten status,
the Gophers are still in third
place behind Michigan and Ohio
State. A 1-1 tie with Purdue two
weeks ago is the only blot on the
Minnesota record but the Gopher
squad boosted its record to 8-0-1
by sweeping three games from
Iowa last weekend.

"I can't recall when a Big Ten
team has gone through a three-
game series while holding the op-
position to just one run," said
Gopher Coach Dick Siebert. "Iowa
wasn't as strong hitting a team
as I had expected, but our pitch-
ers deserve a lot of credit."
Three Tough Moundsmen
Mike McNair currently leads
the pitching staff with a 1.43 ERA
for the season and holds a 2-0
Big Ten record. Frank Brosseau
has won three straight conference
games and boasts a 1.83 ERA over-
all. Jerry Wickman, also 3-0 in
Big Ten play, has a 2.57 ERA.
Dave Hoffman leads the club
in hitting with a .349 mark, fol-
lowed by Ed Bruksch (.323), Bros-
seau (.315), Mike Sadek (.313) and
Bob Fenwick (.311).
Speed has been a key factor
in Minnesota's success to date.
With six games left to play, the
Gophers already have far sur-
passed their previous season high
in stolen bases for a complete
campaign with 108. The best sea-
son's output prior to this year
was 71 in 1960 when Minnesota
won its second NCAA champion-
ship. The Gophers produced only
36 thefts in all of 1965.
Dick Siebert has been coaching
at Minnesota for 18 years. Dur-
ing this time he has seen Min-
nesota lose 12 games to Michi-
gan and wii 10.
Lack Power
According to Siebert, "the Goph-
ers should have pretty good hit-
ting, fielding, pitching and speed
Howe, Hall
Named to NHL
All-Star Team
By The Associated Press '
MONTREAL-Gordie Howe, De-
troit's famed 20-year star, and
Chicago Goalie Glenn Hall set
records yesterday when they were
named to the official National
Hockey League's All-Star first
team.
Chicago placed three other men,
headed by record-breaking scorer
Bobby Hull at left wing, on the
first team. The others on the first
team are Chicago's Stan Mikita
at center and Pierre Pilote at de-
fense, and Montreal's Jacques
Laperriere at defense.
Hull was the only player to
receive the maximum vote of 90
for each half of the season.
Three members of Montreal's
NHL and Stanley Cup champions
-center Jean Beliveau, right
winger Bobby Rosseau and goalie
Lorne (Gump) Worsley-made the
second team. Others on the second
squad are defensemen Pat Staple-
ton of Chicago and Allan Stanley
of Toronto, and left winger Frank
Mahovlich of Toronto.
The 38-year-old Howe celebrated
his 20th season in the NHL by
making the first team for a
record-breaking ninth time and
to either squad a 17th time during
11 consecutive seasons. Howe and
the retired Maurice (Rocket) Ri-
chard of Montreal previously had
shared the mark of eight first
team All-Star selections.
Hall made the first team for the
sixth time, tying the record set
by former Montreal goalie Bill
Durnan. The Chicago netminder
also has been picked for the sec-
ond team three tifes. His total of
nine selections eclipses the goalie
record of eight set by Frank
Brimsek, retired Boston star.
"Behold the Lamb of God, who
taketh away the sins of the
'world"
-John 1:29
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

but will lack power and must rely
on inexperienced men at some po-
sitions."
Siebert would prefer to forget
about last season which found the
Gophers dogged by various "mis-
fortunes" and finally winding up
seventh in the Big Ten on a 5-7
record after winning the confer-
ence and NCAA crowns the year
before. The worst spring weather
in Siebert's memory forced the
scrubbing of 15 games. The long
layoff deprived the team of its
timing with a resultant failure at
the plate.
"If the sophomores c o m e
through, if the weatherman smiles
and if the injury hex, which has
bedevilled Gophers all year sub-
sides, Minnesota's fortunes should
be on the upgrade in '66," says
head Gopher Siebert.
For Michigan, this weekend will
be one of the most crucial tests of
the season. The Wolverines enter
the weekend with a 7-0 first place
after setting down Illinois and
Purdue. Their final series of the
Big Ten season will pit them
against the Michigan State Spar-
tans on May 20-21.
Reed To Start
Bob Reed, hard-throwing Mich-
igan righthander, was the hero of
last weekend series as he won two
of the three contests for the Wol-
verines, blanking the Illini 8-0
and then turning in a relief job
against the Boilermakers to win
7-2. Thus, Reed has won six of
Michigan's seven league victories
so far.
He has already tied the Big Ten
victory mark with his 6-0 league
mark which is 9-1 for all games.
Sophomore Geoff Zahn won the
opener against Purdue with a sev-
en hit performance to give him a
2-1 record along with junior Bill
Zepp.
Bara Paces Hitters
Rightfielder Al Bara still leads
Wolverine hitters in all games
with .363 while Chan Simonds,
first baseman, ranks second with

Michigan track fans will see the
Wolverines in outdoor action for
the first and only time at home
this season when they face Ohio
University and the Chicago Track
Club here tomorrow.
The Ann Arbor Track Club is
also entering a small contingent
of men in the meet at Ferry Field.
Field events will begin at 1:30
p.m. and running events will start
at 2.
The triangular should give a
good indication of the Wolverines'
strengths and weaknesses as they
approach the Big Ten meet in
Bloomington, Ind., next Friday
and Saturday.
Tomorrow's meet is the last
competition for the cindermen be-
fore the championships.
Competing for the Chicago
Track Club will be a number of
ex-collegiate stars including dis-
tance man Al Carius, formerly of
Illinois and former Western Mich-
igan trackman Jerry Ashmore.
In a recent triangular meet with
Iowa and Drake the Chicago TC
showed strength in the field events
by winning the shot put, high
jump and discus. Steve Goldston
of the club won the 100-yard dash
in a time of :09.6.
Ohio, which Michigan has faced
at the Ohio Relays and the Ohio
State Relays earlier this year, will
be led by star half-miler Ron Till-'
man.
A feature event of the meet
will be the mile relay. Michigan'sa
team of Fred Grove, Cecil Norde,
Bob Gerometta and Alex McDon-
ald will be attempting to qualify

for the NCAA tournament in
June. A time of 3:12 or better is
needed. The best time so far this
year for the Wolverine relay team
is 3:12.5.
Pushing the Michigan foursome
in the relay will be the Ann Arbor
Track Club team of former Mich-
igan stars Kent Bernard, Dave
Romain, Ken Burnley and George
Wade.
This quartet turned in the fast-
est clocking by any club in the
country last weekend at the Quan-
BULLETIN
The Michigan golf meet with
Michigan State scheduled for
yesterday was cancelled because
of rain. The golfers' next meet
will be a dual meet with State
in East Lansing on Monday.
tico Relays, running the mile in
a combined time of 3:11.1.
Another outstanding performer
for the Ann Arbor TC is former
Michigan and Olympic discus
thrower Ernst Soudek. In the
Ohio State Relays earlier this year
Soudek set a meet record with a
toss of 192'11". His throw bettered
by more than three feet the 189'
81" mark set recently by the
NCAA's first-ranked discus man,
Gary Carlsen of Southern Cali-
fornia.
Outstanding, Wolverine perform-
ers include Big Ten pole vault
record-holder George Cananiare
and Jack Harvey, the conference
indoor shot put champion.

LOOMNII~
FORS A
JOB?.
-U
t I t-
-a.
NaanpowerTne. the worl
largest temporary help organ
tion has summer openings for
lege men.,You'll be doing hea
and interesting general la
work at good pay. Call or i
the Manpower office in
.home city. We're listed in
white pages of the teleph
directory.
MANPOWE
tVER 400 OFFICES TiEnoUGROE ?UW

BOB GILHOOLEY

344 and Les Tanono, third, with
.341.
Five Michigan diamondmen are
currently in the top ten in the
Big Ten batting statistics. Al Bara
is hitting a hot .407; Bob Gilhool-
ey, .400; Les Tanona, .400; Chan
Simonds, .393, and Keith Spicer,
Coach Moby Benedict will prob-
ably stick to his pitching rotation
by starting Reed (who has an 0.51
Big Ten ERA) against the Hawk-
eyes Friday and then coming back
with Zahn for the first game Sat-
urday.

AL BARA
Michigan will enter this week's
competitions with hopes of chang-
ing the pattern set in the last
two years.
In the previous seasons, the
Wolverines have charged out in
front of the Big Ten race only to
be overtaken on the last two week-
ends of play. This year the Wol-
verines will charge in once again
with a 7-0 standing in the league
and an 18-7 overall heading, and
with a firm grasp on a first place
position which they will try to re-
tain.

Read and Use

Daily Classified

indorsht utchmpon

Major League
Standings

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE-SAVE TIME-IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual ma-
terial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your re-
quired reading, and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing ANY dependence upon external equipment
in reading. The new reading skill is permanently retained.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on MAY 24. This is our Sixth
semester of classes in Ann Arbor.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public DEMONSTRATION of the ACCELERATED
READING method, and see it applied by U. of M. students who have recently completed the
course.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the BELL TOWER INN, located at 300 S_ Thayer St.
(across from Hill Auditorium).

ds

SAMERICAN LEAUE
W L Pet.
Cleveland 15 5 .750
Baltimore 16 6 .727
Detroit 14 9 .609
Chicago 13 9 .591
x-California 14 10 .583
Minnesota 10 10 .500
x-Washington S 14 .364
Kansas City 8 15 .348
New York 7 17 .2921
Boston 7 17.2921
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 4, New York 3
Chicago 5, Bialtimnore 3
Washington 4, California 2
Detroit at Cleveland (rain)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Calitornia (n)
New York at Kansas City (n)
Washington at Minnesota (n)
Chicago at Detroit (n)
Baltimore at Cleveland (n)

GB
-x L
3
3
5
S
81/t
10
10

When school's out,
get m~non a good deal.

THURSDAY, May 12 at 7:30 P.M.
TUESDAY, May 17 at 7:30 P.M.

THURSDAY, May 19 at 7:30 P.M.
MONDAY, May 23 at 7:30 P.M.

NATIONAL CLINIC OF ACCELERATED READING

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
San Francisco 21 7 .750 -
Houston 16 11 .593 4!
Pittsburgh 14 11 .560 5!
aLos Angeles 15 13 .536 6
Philadelphia 12 11 .572 6!
Atlanta 14 16 .467 8
New York 9 11 .450 8
St. Louis 10 14 .417 9
Cincinnati 10 15 .400 9%
Chicago 6 18 .250 13
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 5, Los Angeles I
Nan r rancisco 3, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis 4, Atlanta 3 (12 inn)
Houston at New York (rain)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Nan Francisco at New York (n)
Houston at Philadelphia (n)
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (n)
Cincinnati at Chicago
Atlanta at St. Louis (11)

18964 Coyle St.

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