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May 04, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4. 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNE~U1AY. iWAV £ lORA

[1J Ll[a1 "T1C11 Z, Auvu

port Reveals Students Not
ed Eyed Social Reformers'

STUDENT INSPIRED:

I

Regents Approve Plans for
Married Student Apartments

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-Unrest among
nation's college students may'
be as widespread as some be-
e, an official of the Education
ting Service of Princeton, N.J.:
I women deans and counselors
onvention here recently.
tichard E. Peterson, an asso-
e research psychologist, con-
ded from a nationwide study
t despite the teach-ins, march-
sit-ins, lie-ins, riots, and draft
-d burnings, the nation's col-1
e students are not a bunch of
d-eyed social reformers."
Che fact is, he said, that cam-
food ranked second only to
it rights as a trigger to student
tests in 1964-66. Demonstra-
is against U.S. policy in Viet
n barely beat out organized!
nplaints against dress regula-
is as the third most frequent
se of student demonstrations,
said.
eterson's fndings were based on
return of questionnaires from
)deans at the nation's 1000 ac-
dited four-year colleges and
versities. The deans were ask-
to indicate the extent of or-
iized student protest for each
27 educational, social, and poli-
al issues.
Questionnaire Results
'eterson said a majority of the
ins did report some form of or-
nized protest on their campus
ring 1964-65, but that students'
testing a single issue represent-
a very small percentage of their
dent bodies. No school reported
rotest that included more than
t per cent of the student pop-
tion and that top figure in-
ved dormitory or other living
mangements.
?mong the colleges and univer-
es surveyed, 38 per cent report-
protests over civil rights. Yet'
ese demonstrations involved
ly 6 per cent of the students.'
xt came the food protests (25
r cent), with only about 7 per
it of the students complaining.
Protest in the South over civil
hts during the summer of 1964

tied for third with dormitory reg-
ulations at 28 per cent of the in-
stitutions. But Southern civil
rights work attracted only half-
about 4 per cent-of the students,
as did the protests over dorm
rules and conditions.
Viet Nam demonstrations were
reported at 21 per cent of the
colleges-but less than 5 per cent
of the students participated. How-
ever, Peterson predicted that in
the immediate future Viet Nam
will be the top protest issue.
Few Protestors
In a related note, Peterson said
the "organized student left" prob-
ably accounts for "less thanl 1 per
cent of the total student popula-
tion." He added that there was a
correlation between the number
of students involvedin the student
left and the size of certain pro-
tests, such as those directed against
U.S. policy in Viet Nam.
Although noting that "relatively
few students were engaged" in di-
rect protest, Peterson said "there
obviously are substantial numbers
of students willing to make known
publicly their antagonism to exist-
ing situations-especially those
situations where there is a per-
ceived moral contradiction or hy-
pocrisy."
He said there is "every evi-
dence" that the "number of stu-
dent activists have been multiply-
ing in the past five years" and
called the "current surge of stu-
dent unrest and active protest .. .
among the most significant devel-
opments in higher education, per-
haps in American society, of the
mid-1960's."
Women's Rules
Dr. Prem S. Dua, assistant dean
of women at the Pennsylvania
State University, reported to the
Deans Conference on a study on
the Penn State campus of student
attitudes toward the university's
rules forbidding women from vis-
iting nen's apartments and mak-
ing both men and women liable for
discipline if the rule is broken.
. In a random sampling of ad-

ministrators, parents, and stu-
dents, Dr. Dua found that parents
and administrators generally agree
that the responsibility in deciding
whom and where the student may
visit is a function of the university
rather than the individual stu-
dent. Only 22 per cent of the
parents and 16 per cent of the
administrators thought the stu-
dents should have the right to
make these decisions for them-
selves. Of the students tested, 60
per centhsaid the students them-
selves should be able to make
these decisions.
Dean Dua concluded that any
change in the Penn State rules
was not warranted as "both par-
ents and faculty/administrators
have indicated faith in the uni-
versity's larger awareness of the
contemporary scene and respect
for its professional judgment in
the matter."
Career Plans
Christine Y. Conaway, dean of
women at Ohio State University,
reported that two studies she made
during the past decade indicated
that both the career and educa-
tional anticipations of women are
increasing. Both studies involved
a questionnaire given to freshmen
women during orientation and
both sought information of the
girl, her mother, and her grand-
mother.

(Continued from Page 1)

Shiel, one of the administrators

administration and various hous- working with the student commit-

ing study groups, such as the Pres-
ident's "Blue Ribbon" commission

tee, commented that "everyone
assumed" the committee members

on housing, have long been aware l would see the project statement

of the pressing need for married
student housing and have surveyed
wants and needs.
However, it was the student
committee that presented the spe-
cific request of 400 units of the
townhouse type, which provide
more quiet and privacy, some un-
furnished units , and more bed-
rooms than present units contain.
Goyer said that the committee
had wanted the University to offer
more unfurnished units, since a
survey conducted by the Survey
Research Center has shown 60 per
cent of married students prefer
that type of housing.
He said that the committee ex-
pected plans for Northwood 4 to
be presented at the April Regents'
meeting but that the committee
had not seen the final project
statement before it went to the
Regents, as had been promised. No
reason has been given to com-
mittee members for not being
shown the final statement on
Northwood 4, he said.

before it was presented to the
Regents but said that he "just
didn't know what happened" to
prevent that.
Goyer said that administrators
also failed to present a statement
which they had led the committee
to believe they would present for
another group of 400 similar
apartments, Northwood 5. The
committee hopes these units can
be completed by a year and a half
after the Northwood 4 group.
The committee had hoped that
both Northwood 4 and the pro-
posed Northwood 5 apartments
could be financed under 221 D3 of
the Federal Housing Act, which
offers an unlimited amount of
federal funds, available forua per-
iod of 40 years at a 3 per cent in-
terest rate.
The continued use of the Col-
lege Housing Act to finance mar-
ried student housing was decided

upon, however, since the Univer-
sity would have to set up a non-
profit corporation, approved by
both the Regents and the federal
government, to be eligible for 221
D3 funds. That process would not
have allowed the completion of
married student housing in time to
meet the crucial need.
To construct the new North-
wood group, the University will be
using the minimum building stand-
ards of the Federal Housing Act
which all apartment builders use
instead of its own standard in or-
der to keep rents from exceeding
present Northwood rents.
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