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August 13, 1966 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1966-08-13

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 13,196(;

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 13,1966T HE MICHIGAN DAILY A I"IY~ ~I~WW~4

YALE THKES

5

'FLUNKEYISM'
North Korea Breaks with

28 Senators STRIKE ACTION NEXT WEEK?
Ask Limited House Commerce Committee

-.-=

Chinese,

Russian

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
North Korea has declared it has
had enough of what it calls "flun-
keyism." In effect, it has declared
its independence from both major
world Communist camps.
It mirrors a phenomenon now
taking place in Europe, indicating
a spreading contagion that threat-
ens the Communist bloc with pro-
gressive disintegration.
In-an official statement in the
party paper, Pyongyang's Rodong
Shimoon, the North Korean party1
yesterday said it will play flunkey

neither to Peking nor Moscow. It
contends no one party or nation is
superior to all others, and that no
one party can claim to guide and
direct the policies of all the others.
To a certain extent, North Kor-
ea, like other parties around the
world, is required to be a flunkey
in many respects to the two gi-
ants. But this statement can be
regarded as yet another manifes-
tation of nationalism as a factor
in world Communist affairs. It is
unlikely to be welcomed either in
Peking or Moscow.
It can jolt Peking because it

will tend to confirm the North
Korean party's success in wrig-
gling out of the grip of Red Chi-
nese domination. It can be read,
also, as a rebuff to Moscow's re-
peated claims to be the rightful
guide for the whole world move-
ment.
There has been considerable
evidence that the Soviet party has
been trying to force a world Com-
munist meeting which ostensibly
would be aimed at "unity of ac-
tion," but in reality would seek to
reaffirm Moscow's leading role in
the world movement.

[

World News Roundup

Blocbs
Not long ago, Moscow propagan-
da sought to reassure the world's
Communists that there was no in-
tention of re-establishing a Com-
munist International-Comintern
-in the pattern of the organiza-
tion which functioned as central
authority for the movement be-
fore the war.
One Reason
One reason for this reassurance
appeared to be that Red China
itself now was attempting to be-
come the single, authoritative cen-
ter of a Communist world move-
ment.
Soviet theoreticians wrote that
a new Comintern would revert to
a system which was obsolete and
could even hinder the development
of the world movement. The Com-
intern was dissolved in 1943.
But the Russians made clear
they wanted some new sort of or-
ganization for world Communist
unity, which they claimed could
be on the basis of independence
and equal rights of individual par-
ties. Current world conditions,
they contended, required "a new
organizational form.".
This was rejected by the prin-
cipal Maverick in the East Euro-
pean bloc, Romania. That rejec-
tion was in almost the same words
as the ones which now come from
North Korea.
Romania said: "An internation-
al center to guide parties along,
uniform lines no longer is pos-
sible."
North Korea said: "There can
be no superior or inferior party,

Reserve Call'
'A Scandal Here,'
Russell Charges,
Seeks Equal Service
WASHINGTON (A) - A new de-
mand that some Reserves be call-z
ed toNactive duty for the war in
Viet Nam came from the Senate
Appropriations Committee yester-
day when it approved a defenses
budget of more than $58 billion.E
"The committee insists that im-
mediate consideration be given to
utilizing Reserve forces, especial-
ly those individuals who have no
service in the active forces except
as trainees, to meet some or all
of the additional requirements of
the active forces for additional
men," the committee said.
"It would be in the national in-
terest to utilize a reasonable por-
tion of the Reserve forces of all
the services" in fulfilling the U.S.
commitment in Viet Nam, the 28-
man committee said in its formal
report on the annual military ap-
propriations bill for the yeart
which started July 1.
"We have got a scandal here,"
said Sen. Richard B. Russell, (D-
Ga.), floor manager of the bill.
"Men who have enough pull to
get into the Reserve or National
Guard units are not being sent to
fight, while the man across the
street who is drafted lands in Viett
Nam.r
"I am seeking equality of service
by all Americans," he told news-
men. "It costs just as much tor
train a Reservist as a draftee forE
six months. The difference is that
the draftee probably goes to Viets
Nam."'
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara, with the backing of
President Johnson, so far his de-1
clined to call any Reserves to du-
ty, either in units or as individu-
als. Both men have said such ac-
tion may be required in the fu-
ture, however.
Young men who enlist in the
Army Reserve or the National!
Guard obligate themselves to a
six-month tour of active duty.
They then are assigned to units orI
to a manpower pool.
Russell said there is a backlog
of more than 130,000 of these vol-
unteers who have not even been
given the six months of training.

By EDMOND LEBRETON
WASHINGTON (P) - A back-
to-work bill was approved yester-
day by the House Commerce Com-
mittee, giving Congress a chance
to legislate an end to the airline
strike next week if no voluntary
settlement is reached.
The committee divided 17 to 13
on the measure by which 35,400
striking mechanics could be order-
ed back to their jobs on five air-

Four Conservative
Groups To Merge

By WALTER R. MEARS
WASHINGTON (P) - Seeking
to forge a more effective political
apparatus, four major conserva-
tive organizations moved yesterday
to pool their efforts to influence
the American voter.

The four organizations are
Goldwater's own Free Society As-
sociation, Americans for Constitu-
tional Action, the American Con-
servative Union and the Young
Americans for Freedom.
Two of them - the Free So-
- 4- ..... . ..1 ..<_ .._ J LL A __ ___

lines for as long as 180 days.
Chairman Harley O. Stagg.rs,
tD-W. Va.), announced the action
with no enthusiasm, predicting
"a chaotic situation" when the
measure reaches the House floor-
which he said is not likely to be
earlier than Thursday.
"My prediction is it will have an,
awful time in the House," ,Stag-
gers said, adding he is not saying
how he will vote..

However, House leaders moved
to expedite consideration and the
Rules Committee set a meeting
for Monday afternoon, opening up
the possibility the House might
begin consideration Tuesday, The
Rules Committee, under usual pro-
cedures, must clear a bill before
there can be floor action on it.
Strenuous but closely guarded
efforts continued to settle the
strike, which began July 8 and for
36 days repeatedly ,has balked
would-be peacemakers, including
President Johnson. Despite offi-
cial denials, there were secret
meetings of spokesmen for both
sides yesterday.
' Identical
The committee-approved bill is
almost identical with one the
Senate has already passed. If the
House passes it unchanged, the
Senate presumably would accept
the minor alterations without in-
sisting on a conference.
The measure calls for a 30-day
resumption of work by congress-
ional mandate, followed by a num-
ber of procedures the President
could use to delay for as much as
150 days more any resumption of
the strike.
The administration has refused
either to endorse or condemn leg-
islation, and has called the strike
a grave inconvenience, but not a
national emergency.
House members are reported re-
ceiving a rising flood of letters and
telegrams, including many from
union groups other than the AIL-
CIO International Association of
Machinists, which represents the
strikers.

Approves Back-To-Work Bill

B'The A niatpd Pp

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sy neassoca eu Press Iavalabie to us snow tnat tne two ready to join Malaysia in fighting
The American embassy in Sai- targets are in Viet Nam," communism. Until recently, Indo-
gon yesterday responded to Cam- Of a Cambodian declaration nesia was communism's chief ally
that a pregnant woman was killed in Southeast Asia and received
bodian charges that U.S. and and six persons were wounded in about $3 billion in military aid
South Vietnamese aircraft at- the first raid, by two U.S. heli- from the Soviet Union.
tacked a village in Cambodia on copters, the embassy said, "Of Indonesia's visiting foreign min-
July 31 and Aug. 2. course, we profoundly regret the ister, Adam Malik, also told a
The embassy said the raids on loss of any innocent lives." news conference here his country
that village and on a point 900 * * welcomed Malaysia's offer to sup-
meters to the east were made in KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - port its readmission into the Uni-
response to ground fire and "maps Indonesia said yesterday it is ted Nations.
DAILY OFFICIAL BLEI
sed~ssisiM~tuNsaMM~.. . . . . . . .:.. . . . . imsismiagsigsess .msgn......ns~ge

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Barry Goldwater proposed the ciety Association and the Amen-
alliance, and presided over the can Conservative Union-were cre-
meeting at which it was approved. ated after Goldwater, as Republi-
The decision came at a Thurs- can presidential nominee, lost by
day conference in Goldwater's a massive -margin to President
Washington apartment and was Johnson two years ago.
announced yesterday. Goldwater, "The groups will not merge, but
through a spokesman, denied it will closely coordinate their work,
represents any move toward a con- avoid duplication and thus try to
servative third party. serve the conservative movement
The Republican National Com- more effectively, a spokesman
mittee, whose Chairman Ray C. said.
Bliss, has complained in the past Goldwater himself described the
of GOP splinter movements, was move this way: "My purpose was
silent on the conservative unity to bring the leading conservative
move. organizations together."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.

i

nor a party that gives guidance
ing;thesis: "Turbulent Natural Con-nd a party that gives guidn
Echo uic e eayM vection in Air Along a Vertical Flat and a party that receives guid-
Plate," Tues., Aug. 23, Room 2026 Fluids ance. No one party can serve as
School of Music Degree Recital-Ma- Lab., North Campus, at 9 a.m. Chair- the center of the world revolution
beth Saure, sopurano: Recital Hall, man, V. S. Arpaci. ,se a g r
School of Music, 8:30 p.m. or as the leading party. '
School of Music Faculty Recital - Place v-> Romania of Asia
Jerome Jelinek, cello and Rhea Kis:h, IThus, North Korea becomes, ap-
piano: Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30 p.m. ANNOUNCEMENT: parently, the Romania of Asian
Federal Service Entrance Examination communism. It indicates that'
D -ue to the large number of post- wiei a ebudb eti
( oneral i o ices "ons*silloen n hI". en-While it may be bound by certain
tucky, Mich., Oo, and Wis. area the internationalist obligations, it is
Student Government Council Approval FSEE will remain open for applications not bound to accept either Chi-
If the followiung studetit-sponsored until Aug. 31, 1966. Opportunities covernseoSvitdcao.
events becomes effective 24 hours after i age l. U itio nese or Soviet dictation.
the publication of this notice. All fondrat ge Bureau of pppinmens
publicity for these events must be or on back page of the FSEE announce-
withheld until the approval has becorne ment. Send it to U.S. Civil erviceGE
effective Commission, Main Post Office Bldg ,
Approval request forms for student Chicago, Ill., 60607. Test dates for all PARAMONTPEiassctithSEYEARTdSNTRA
sponsored events are available in Room cities in this area willsbe determined presents R3NK ffla=
1011 of the SAB. after sufficient applications are re-
India Students' Association, Inde- ceived, Applicants will be notified of M am a Lim
pendence Day Celebration, Sun., Aug. time and place of exams.
14, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union Confer- (Continued on Page 4)
e~ ce~R-o-.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 13
Day Calendar
International Seminar on Teacher
Education in Music-School of Music,
9 a n.
Cinema Guild-"Drums Along the Mo-
hawk": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Spech and School of Music
Opesa-Mozart's "Cori Fan Tutte,".7o-
sef Blatt, musical director and conduc-
tor, Ralph Herbert, stage director: Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-John
{, Vanelia, organist: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.

ENTERPRISES

s
.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizatins only. Forms are available in
Roam loll BS.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,
Mon., Aug. 15, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
India Students' Association, Inde-
pendence Day Celebration: chief guest,
Prof. Jablonsky; Sun., Aug. 14, 7:30
pm., Conference Room, Michigan Un-,
ion,
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
service, Sun., Aug. 14, 10:30 a.m., Hill
St. at Forest Ave.
University Lutheran Chapel, Worship
service, sermon by Rev. Scheips: "The
Whole Church-Christ's Mission," Sun.,
Aug. 14, 9:45 a.m.; Bible class, 11 a.m.,
1511 Washtenaw.

Doctoral Examination for William.
Dallas Coats, Education; thesis: "In-
vestigation and Simulation of the Re-
lationships among Selected Classroom
Variables," Sat., Aug. 13, Room 4200G
UHS, at 2 p.m. Chairman, M. C. John-
'son.
Doctoral Examination for Bruce Yen
Lin Wu, Far Eastern Languages andI
Literature; thesis: "Tai Chen: Confu-
cian Classics and Philosophy," Mon.,
Aug. 15, Room 4001 Angell Hall, at 3
p.m. Chairman, Ying-shih Yu.
Doctoral Examination for William
Henry Evers, Industrial Engineering;
thesis: "A New Stochastic Linear Pro-
gramming Model," Mon., Aug. 15, Room
275 West Engineering, at 7:30 p.m.
Chairman, R. M. Thrall.
Doctoral Examination for James
Alexander Reeds, Linguistics; thesis:
"Front Vowel Aperture and Diffuse-
ness in Midwestern American English,"
Tues., Aug. 16, Room 168 Frieze Bldg.,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, Gordon Peterson.
Doctoral Examination for Clifton Da-
vid Hollister, Social Work and Sociology;
thesis: "Bureaucratic Structure and
School-Parent Communication in 18 De-
troit Elementary Schools," Thurs., Aug.
18, Room 5615 Haven Hall, at 3 p.m. Co-
Chairmen, Eugene Litwak and L. H.
Mayhew.
Doctoral Examnination for Charles
Young Warner, Mechanical Engineer-

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j he' i Southern Clifori visit Universal C'ty Studios
WORLD PREVUE ENGAGEMENT!
tarts WEDNESDAY, AUG. 24
Itis with special pride that we present the first univer-
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motion pictures of the decade. Adult, Mod, and in the
tempo of the times . . . this exciting adaptation
of the successful London annd Broadway stage success
"THE PRIVATE EAR" by Peter Shaffer is a "must see"
for those who aren's easily shocked.
Really!! ,
there's a time
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everything.
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this time I know
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TONIGHT ...
f U
JOHN FORD
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DRUMS ALONG
THE MOHAWK f
(1939)
1 1
SHORT: "Polodini"
COLOR;
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Starring: HENRY FONDA, CLAUDETTE COLBERT,
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3

W
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IMPORTANT! NO ONE UNDER 18 WILL BE ADMITTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY HIS PARENT.
ru a
II ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION
OF EDWARD ALBEE'S
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Shows at 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Eves, & Sun, $1.50
Matinees $1.25

MI

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F r n r rr ws o o .r r rrrmn r

L

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Summer

Session

Students:

I

DON'T LEAVE WITHOUT SOMETHING
TANGIBLE!

I ':' "

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