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August 11, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-08-11

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1966
Strike-Endgin

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Proposal
Hearings

Falls

Apart

In

WASHINGTON (P)-The last- approve arbitration without a pri-
ditch proposal of a politically or commitment on major contract
queasy Congress for ending the issues involving wages, fringe
34-day airlines strike without leg- benefits and working conditions.
islation fell apart yesterday. An Both Siemiller and Curtin ear-
airlines spokesman accused the lier yesterday agreed to the sug-

union of sabotaging it.
Chief airlines negotiator William
J. Curtin said Machinists' Union
President P. L. Roy Siemiller's
1 had made it clear that "the union
does not desire to end this dispute
by voluntary arbitration."
Curtin's statement came after
Siemiller said there is "little or
no prospect" that the 35,000 strik-
ers of five major airlines would

gestion of Chairman Harley 0.
Staggers (D-WVa) of the House
Commerce Committee to try to
work out an arbitration agreement
in order to avoid back-to-work
legislation.
The members of Siemiller's
AFLCIO International Association
of Machinists 10 days ago reject-
ed a contract proposal negotiated
in the White House, crushing it

by a margin of nearly 3 to 1.
"Prejudging the vote by the in-
ternational president clearly indi-
cates that the union does not de-
sire to end this dispute by volun-
tary arbitration," Curtin said of
the latest effort to get Congress
and the Johnson administration
off the hook by settling the strike
without legislation.
"Mr. Siemiller has done two
things which have underminedj
this effort by congressman Stag-
gers to end this burdensome 34-
day strike," Curtin said.
"First, he has publicly declared
that he does not believe his mem-

bers will accept arbitration. Sec-
ondly, he has said that he does not
believe he can convince them to
accept it."
What this apparently meant was
that the two sides never would
get together on an agreement as
to the issues which should be
arbitrated.
Meanwhile, Staggers said his
committee expects to complete ac-
tion by tonight on some kind of
strike-ending legislation, but not
necessarily the Senate-passed bill
that would order the strikers back
to work for up to six months.
The developments dashed hopes
briefly raised at yesterday's hear-

Reshuffles
Government
In England
LONDON (I)-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson reshuffled his cab-
inet last night, appointing For-
eign. Secretary Michael Stewart
to the strong man post of director
of the British economy. Wilson's
deputy, George Brown, was named
to succeed Stewart as foreign sec-
retary.
The announcement came as the
government won a 58-vote major-
ity in the House of Commons on
its bill to freeze prices and wages
The majority was nearly 40 votes
short of the Labor government's
nominal margin in the house.
Despite Brown's continuing des-
ignation as deputy prime minister
and his new duties as foreign sec-
retary it was clear that Stewart's
move is the real promotion of the
whole reshuffle.
He emerges, next to Wilson, as
a new strong man 'in the govern-
ment.
The other major change is that
Herbert Bowden takes over as sec-
retary of state for the Common-
wealth.
This is the job which involves
solving the long-drawn crisis over
Rhodesia. Arthur Bottomley, for-
mer Commonwealth minister, be-
comes minister of overseas devel-
opment, a job which means little
now that Britain is short of cash
to spend overseas.

JAKARTA (A') - Indonesia and
Malaysia will sign a formal peace
agreement today to end their
three-year-old undeclared war,
There were fears President Su-
karno, although now only a fig-
urehead, might try some last-
minute sabotage.
Some officials were worried that

Sukarno, who initiated the, con-
frontation in 1963, might insult'
Razak and cause him to walk out.
They hoped Razak would ignore
any outburst as he and other Ma-
laysian leaders ignored Sukarno's
anti-Malaysia tirade late last
month.
Sukarno tried to smash the
British-backed Federation of Ma-

World News Roundup

UNDECLARED CONFLICT:
Indonesia, Malaysia To Sign
Peace Agreement Ending War

Anticipate Korean-Si
In Viet Conflict By Ei

ing before Staggers' committee for
/) x p e a possible solution short of legis-
SExpenselation.
Curtin said Siemiller told the
House committee that he "would
] o f Y e r i urge his members to grant author-
1 d o f Y ea ity to submit all unresolved issues
to voluntary, binding arbitration."
500,000 to 600,000 might be neces- Curtin added that, "The five
sary to defeat the Communists in airlines immediately agreed to ar-
South Viet Nam. bitrate unconditionally."

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A divided
Senate headed yesterday toward a
showdown tomorrow on efforts to
bring up for debate the House-
passed civil rights bill before La-
bor Day and to keep it from being
bottled up in committee.
CHICAGO-A band of 200 civil
rights protestors marched through
downtown Chicago and picketed
the Chicago Real Estate Board
office yesterday after a series of
confusing decision changes.
The demonstrators have been
protesting against alleged housing
discrimination for three weeks.

CALCUTTA-Five persons were
reported killed and 71 injured
when the army opened fire on
rioting students yesterday in Shil-
long, capital of Assam, India.
According to reports reaching
Calcutta, the students swept
through the state secretariat,
smashing doors and windows and
then burst out of the building and
into other areas of the city.
HONOLULU - Gen. William C.
Westmoreland said yesterday that
more troops will be needed in Viet
Nam. But, the top U.S. military
leader in Viet Nam declined to
get into questions of troop ratios
needed to defeat the Communists.

laysia on the grounds that it wa
a form of colonialism. He calle
this action a "policy of confron
tation." The new government c
Indonesia is determined to en
this expensive and potentially ex
plosive conflict.
Indonesian Foreign Ministe
Adam Malik was scheduled to fi
to Kuala Lumpur with Razak fo
further celebrations there of th
peace agreement to exhibit Indo
nesian enthusiasm.
Indonesia's Nationalist party
one of the most powerful politica
groups in the country, renewed it
support of Sukarno and his poli
cies yesterday. The party, domi
nated by the 65-year-old presiden
for 38 years, is strongest in centra
Java where the new government i
weakest.
The war also had global reper-
cussions. Indonesia walked out of
the United Nations when Malaysi
was admitted; Britain, Malaysia'
Commonwealth partner, had t
keep 50,000 men in the area to
defend her former colony. Th
trade ban was a blow to Singa
pore, the natural market for In
donesia's exports, and port of en
try for imports. Singapore took it
self out of the Federation of Ma
laysia largely because of the con
frontation policy.

WASHINGTON (RP)-Viet Nam
appears well on the way to be-
coming the biggest foreign war in
American history outside of the
two world wars.
There is a general expectation
that by the end of this year the
Vietnamese conflict will assume
Korean-size proportions, and could
reach much higher levels.

"It's very apparent we're going'
to need more men there," Sen.
John C. Stennis (D-Miss), chair-
man of a Senate Armed Services
subcommittee, told a reporter yes-
terday.
Stennis, who predicted in Jan-
uary the U.S. commitment in Viet'
Nam could reach 400,000 men by
the close of 1966, said an eventual

U.S. Marines Smash
Viet Cong in-H Fighting

SAIGON (A) - South Korean
troops and U.S. Marines smashed
the enemy yesterday in two battles
about 140 miles apart, and report-
ed killing at least 310.
In their biggest battle of the
war, South Koreans, in company
strength, and five U.S. tanks shot
to pieces a battalion of 600 North
Vietnamese who charged in hu-
man waves through the central
highland jungles. The Koreans
reported 170 enemy dead and
many arms captured.
To the north, elements of the
U.S. 5th Marine Regiment, which
fought alongside the Koreans in
the Korean War, attacked a Viet
Cong force and estimated they
killed 140 in a battle 35 miles
south of Da Nang, the northern
Leatherneck base. Fighting con-

tinued after nightfall.
In both actions, military spokes-
men said allied casualties were
light.
There were other developments
as the tempo of fighting picked
up:
-U.S. planes launched hun-
dreds of strikes against military
targets in North and South Viet
Nam Tuesday and for the first
time in three days the U.S. Corn-
mand reported no planes were lost.
-The U.S. Air Force said the
Viet Cong captured a village in
the Mekong River delta Tuesday,
fired on a spotter plane, then held
the villagers at gunpoint when two
U.S. jets attacked, killing 15 Viet-
namese and wounding 182. Help
was rushed to the village later
when it was learned that the Viet
Cong had provoked the air raid.

President Johnson has said that
whatever forces are required will
be sent to Southeast Asia, and
Congress, despite a hotbed of cri-
ticism over his Southeast Asian'
polices, has backed his requests.
Already U.S. forces associated
with the Viet Nam war amount to
an estimated 375,000. This includes
290,000 on the ground, 60,000 off-
shore in Navy vessels and at least
25,000 in supporting bases and
supply units in Guam, Thailand,
the Philippines and Okinawa.
A 400,000-man ground force in
South Viet Nam, plus the 85,000
offshore and in war-related oper-
ations in the general area would
exceed the 475,000 men used di-
rectly and in support of the Ko-
rean War at its peak in 1953.
The prospect of . a Korean-
sized war around next Christmas
stands in stark contrast to the
late 1964 prediction of Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
that the United States could wind
up major Viet Nam operations in
1965. Communist actions led to a
change in U.S. planning.
U.S. planes now are bombing
targets in North and South Viet
Nam at three times the rate of
Korean bombing. The annual rate
of bomb tonnage being directed
against Communist infiltration
routes and supply and troop areas
totals more than 600,000 tons, al-
most the amount used in three
years of the Korean War.

The apparent blowup of any
arbitration agreement tossed the
hot political potato of the airlines
strike back to Congress.
Initial Reaction
Initial reaction from strikers
was mostly negative to the pro-
posal to go back to work volun-
tarily while submitting unresolved
issues in the contract dispute to
binding arbitration.
Siemiller appeared to indicate
the strikers would first have to be
promised most of the hefty gains
in the proposed White House con-
tract the strikers rejected by a
crushing vote 10 days ago. That
provided for an estimated 72 cents
an hour over three years in-wages
and fringe benefits.
"We expect to meet the car-
riers-to find out which issues we
agree on and which issues we can-
not agree on," Siemiller said.
"We are prepared to ask our
members for authority to submit
l the unresolved issues to arbitra-
tion," the union chief said; add-
ing: "In my opinion, unless there
is agreement on most issues there
is little or no prospect of member-
ship ratification or approval."
However, the proposal was ac-
cepted in principle by Curtin.
Staggers, in making the arbi-
tration proposal, said it was "the
last thing we could possibly do"
before going on with proposed leg-
islation to force the union to call
off the strike.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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--

.:

The Daily Official ulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
Ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 11
Day Calendar
Bureau of Indusrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Negotiating for School Admin-
istrators": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
International Seminar on Teacher
Education in Music-School of Music,
9 a.m.
Dept. of Spech and School of Music
Opera-Mozart's "Cori Fan Tutte," Jo-
sef Blatt, musical director and conduc-
tor, Ralph Herbert, stage director: Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Grade Sheets: Grade sheets have been
distributed to all departments for the
reporting of Spring-Summer full term
and Summer half term grades.
Grades for students receiving degrees
at the end of the summer term should
be submitted to the Office of the Reg-
istrar within 48 hours after the exam-
ination has been given. Grades for stu-
dents not candidates for degrees should
be submitted to the Office of the Reg-
istrar not later than 72 hours after
the examination.
To assist instructors in reporting
grades, the Office of the Registrar will
provide messenger service to departmen-
tal offices on the central campus on a
regular basis during the period Aug.
17-19 and Aug. 22, 23 and 24. Grades
may be submitted directly at Window
A in the Administration Bldg.

Any questions concerning grades may the student's graduation until a later applications available dt Bureau of Ap-
be directed to this office by calling date. pointments.
764-6292.- -1

i

Recommendation for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative August grad-
uates from the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, for Honors or
High Honors should recommend such
students by forwarding a letter to the
Director, Honors Council, 1210 Angell
Hall, by noon, Fri., Aug. 19.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters di-
rectly to the Office of the Registrar,
Room 1513 Administration Bldg., by
11 a.m., Fri., Aug. 19.
Attention August Graduates: College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music,
School of Public Health, School of
Business Administration: Students are
advised not to request grades of I or
X in August. When such grades are
absolutely imperative, the work must
be made up in time to allow your in-
structor to report the make-up grade
not later than 11 a.m., Aug. 19. Grades
received after that time may defer

Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you may serve.
Test will be given Sat., Aug. 13, at the
downtown Post Office, Main and aCth-
erine, at 9 a.m. To take test applica-
tion must be completed. Details and

POSITION OPENINGS:
New York Air Brake Co., Syracuse,
N.Y.-Openings in engineering fields,
Project, Process, Industrial, Manufac-
turing, IE, ME, EE with 3-5 yrs. exper.
These in Watertown, N.Y. Other oppor-
tunities in R.I., Mich., Ill., Mass. Open-
ings in marketing in NYC.
(Continued on Page 4)

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IMPORTANTI NO ONE UNDER 18 WILLB E ADMITTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY HIS PARENT.

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