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August 03, 1966 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1966-08-03

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/

AT, AUGUST 3,1966

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

PA TT Iumv

r 'lxL 1 ALtt£,Z

.

Johnson

rp

;es Congress
Strike Laws

Administer
WASHINGTON (') - President
Johnson sent word to the Senate
yesterday that he wanted legisla-
tion that would halt the airline
strike, but without saddling him
with responsibility for ordering the
machinists back to work.
Senate Republican Leader Ever-
ett M. Dirksen of Illinois report-
ed receiving that presidential view
in a telephone talk with Johnson.
Dirksen's report came while the"
Senate argued about legislation
to get the five strikebound ma-
jor airlines flying again. The strike
of 35,000 members of the AFL ".
CIO International Association of
Machinists is now in its 26th day
after Johnson's pact-making ef-
fort had csollapsed over the week-
end.,
Against'a backdrop of election-
year politics, the Senate debate
centered on the question of who
-Johfson or Congress- should
actually order thestrikers back
to work. u
Dirksen reported a joint Repub-
lican-Democratic leadership effort
to draft, with the help of Senate
experts, a compromise that would
share the responsibility-and the .:
blame in labor's eyes-for a strike-
stopping decision.
Atty. Gen. Nicholas Katzenbach
came to Capitol Hill to join that
effort.
The compromise plan may be in-
troduced in the Senate today, the
GOP leader said,
"Certainly he wants legislation,"
Dirksen said of the President.
Until this point, Johnson had
avoided committing the adminis-
tration to support a law ending
the strike. U.S. SOLDIERS AWAI
At the same time, Dirksen told
reporters, Johnson does not want
that legislation to put solely in
heandsthe authority to order fA trA
"The President believes that the *
decision and the finding are a
matter for the legislative branch
of the government to make and D e nD es
not for him to make," Dirksen Dn e I
said.-
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore) has SAIGON W1) - United
proposed legislation which would planes have struck a third
have Congress rule that the strike the oil storage depotsc
t has disrupted essential transpor- North Viet Nam's key port
tation and order the strikers back phong.
to their jobs for six months.
The Senate Labor Committee This was announced in
advocates a measure which would ington after North Viet
make a similar determination but charged that U.S. planes
require an executive order to stop Haiphong yesterday, "indi
the strike. nately bombing residential
"The crux," said Dirksen, "is who ters and factories."
embraces the primary responsibil- The oil depot is situated
ity to move in this matter-is it Haiphong dock area two
the Congress or is it the Presi- northeast of the heart of t
dent? The Defense Department
"The general feeling is that
there ought to be a shared respon- ment, issued in response
sibility-if they can work it out,'' quiries from newsmen, sai
he said. "There were numerous m
Sen. Russell B. Long (D-La) by U.S. aircraft against PO
quoted Katzenbach as questioning troleum, oil, lubricant) tar
the legality of the bill that would North Viet Nam. One of
have Johnson issue strike-ending missions was flown again
orders. Haiphong POL storage are
"No standards are expressed in liminary reports from the
the resolution by which to guide indicate all ordnance was o
the President in this extraordinary get."
exercise of power," the attorney This was taken to mea
general said in a letter to Long. the port itself was not hi
Katzenbach said that would in- Pentagon did not elaborat
vite court action challenging the ''That is all we are going
action. at this time," a spokesman
In the Senate, Sen. Peter H. A radio broadcast from
Dominick (R-Colo) introduced hisA
own compromise idea, a measure
which would have Congress order P
a 60-day end to the strike and p fesSi
leave it to Johnson to extend that j
for 120 more days if he chose.
In the Senate and in private"
huddles, lawmakers conceded that -nereasii
the whole effort was clouded byant
Lelectiohi-year politics and the vot-
ing power of organized labor. (continued from Page )
Morse told the Senate that labor
lobbyists are peering ovr the shoul- He cited other factors:
der of the Senate, and he said As graduate studentsg

sortie lawmakers-he did not name know their professors, the
them-are reluctant to take re- many of them to be inte
sponsibility for ending the strike people, living interesting liv
with elections four months away. Along with the end of the
"We've got some senators in about the dull, absent-minde
Congress who say the President fessor, the myth about stun
isn't a candidate in 1966 but we bureaucracy in governmentI
are," Morse said. the dust.
"The issue here is not compli- Mr. Munschauer strongly1
cated," he added. "It is as simple that, instead of lecturing t
as election day." . dents for their lack of ap
Morse said advocates of presi- tion of business, they might
dential action want to pass the of the public image created
buck to the White House and various competing sectors.
avoid the blame by labor for a the modern student might
forced return to work. loss to name "any mode
He knows that labor backing and Andrew Carnegie," he rec
contributions can be crucial to a the names of Nathan Pusey
campaigning senator, Morse saidW.eGareaanC uke
for he has had them-but he W Gardner, and Clark e
added a lawmaker's responsibilities spectively president of I
"go far beyond our obligations to Secretaiy of Health, Edu
organized labor for° campaign sup- and Welfare, and president
port." University of California.
Sen. Frank J. Lausche (D-Ohio) Moreover, he warned, bu
contended that Congress would be too often takes the negative
ducking its responsibility if it conservative view on the ve
passed Clark's bill authorizing the sues of social science which
President to send the strikers back youth. He elaborated:
to work. "Politicians and bureaucra

Perth Amboy
Scene Of
More Riots
Puerto Rican YouthsI
Involved in Incidents
In New Jersey City
PERTH AMBOY, N.J. (R)
Police arrested 26 adults and seven
juveniles late yesterday as a rock-
throwing disturbance broke out
for the fourth straight night in a
predominantly P u e r t o Rican
neighborhood.
The disturbance, involving about
100 youths, lasted less than an
hour, police said. It was described
as the worst of the four outbreaks.
There were no immediate re-
ports of injuries but police said
several patrol cars were stoned.
The 33 arrested were charged as
disorderly persons.
Sixty helmeted policemen of the
city's 90-man force dispersed the
crowd which had gathered in ap-
parent defiance of a new anti-
loitering law which some Puerto
Ricans have charged was directed

HARASSMENT REPORTED:
Predict Exodus of Teachers
From New Argentine Regime

BUENOS AIRES ()--An exodus
of university teachers and stu-
dents from Argentina was preA
dicted yesterday as a result of
government seizure of the uni-
versities and bloody police clash-
es with students.
"Many of the best professors
will leave," said Warren Ambrose,
a professor of mathematics from
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology who has been teaching at
the University of Buenos Aires.
Amrose, 51, was caught in the
battle Friday night, between police
and students and reported he and
other professors were beaten and
insulted by police. In Washing-
ton, the State Department ex-
pressed concern to the Argentine

President Arturo Illia, charging
Illia had failed to promote Argen-
tina's development.
The government Monday night
authorized three universities to
resume classes, saying the rectors
had agreed to government control.
But the 150,000 students at the
other six universities, whose rec-
tors refused to submit to govern-
ment direction, remained on an
enforced two-week vacation.
'Police guarded the six campuses.
',ilario Fernandez Long, rector
of the University of Buenos Aires,

resigned, as did many of his fac-
ulty.
An Argentine chemistry profes-
sor commented: "I'm leaving for
Uruguay to seek work there."
In the United States Senate,
Se'n. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY) said
the U.S. government had extended
diplomatic recognition to the On-
gania regime too hastily. He urged'
President Johnson to withhold
economic and military aid from
the Argentine government on the
ground it had suppressed academic
freedom.

Experiments Pose

Embassy.
It was not learned immediate-
ly whether Ambrose would be
among those leaving.
President Juan Carlos Ongania's
military regime, in a drastic ac- (Continued from Page 1)
tion rare for Latin America, took cover may carry with it even more
over all nine state universities serious implications than the aw-

oblems

-Associated Press
T AIRLIFT from a rubber plantation 120 miles north of Saigon to an-
other area, searching for Viet Cong.
acks Hanoi Oil Depots,
Residential Area Struck

at them. Friday, contending that Commu- ful achievements of the ator
Monday, just before the out- nists had penetrated the faculties. physicists."
break that night, about 500 resi- Violence broke out when stu- Individual m o r a 1 judgme
dents of the area met with city dents refused to leave the Buenos again must supplant legal def
officials and anti-poverty workers Aires campus after the govern- ition in physical experimentati
to discuss their grievances. ment orders suspending the uni- The rule which is supposedly gu
Mayor James J. Flynn Jr. versities' autonomous status. After ing experimenters is incorpora
promised to seek more Spanish- the disturbance, the schools were in a document known as the Ni
ordered closed until Aug. 16. emburg Code, established by a t
seakiyngorderstfor wslfare and edOngania, an army general, seiz- bunal committee after World W
employment departments., ed power in a coup June 23 from~ II.
After the meeting, however,_
about 100 youths left the hall to- -
join another 100 youths gathered
outside. Police began breaking up twhue
began ~rorld New s Roundup
the crowd and the disturbance g
Meanwhile, in Nebraska, Gov.
Frank Morrison emerged from a By The Associated Press WASHINGTON-The State I
conference probing Omaha's near J KARACHI, Pakistan-About 45 partment said yesterday t
North Side troubles yesterday and villages in a 2.300 square mile area Presidential Envoy W. Ave
vowed, "We're having no truck were reported destroyed by a Harriman will go to Cambo
with advocates of violence." severe earthquake which rocked early in September for talks w
His statement and one from the Quetta region yesterday. the chief of state, Prince Norodo
Omaha Mayor A. V. Sorensen sig- Officials estimated that 3.000 Sihanouk.
naled an apparent change in tos5.000 families were left home- Officer Robert J.
poiy;n h ra vrteless. PressOfieRortJM
Aftercriots Closkey said the talks will d
July 4 weekend, both Morrison NEW YORK - When Frazer with U.S.-Cambodian relatio
and Sorensen met with represent- Dou~ herty paid off his overdue but he did not rule out the pos
atives of the rioters to learn their parking tickets he sent the police bility that they would incl
grievances. denartment a check for $2,100. American prisoners held by No]
To meet two of the complaints The payment was part of more Viet Nam.
-lack of recreational facilities than $5 million the city received L.i.e
and jobs-the city afterward during a two week amnesty to mo- LONDON-Prime Miister H
moved quickly with programs in torists before putting into opera- old Wilson told Parliament y
both areas. tion a new computer designed to terday that President Johnson i
"It was constructive then but it track down scofflaws who ignore told him of "the continuing de
of the United States governmen
was not normal procedure and parking tickets.for uncoUnitd altaks inme
now we are going to follow normal Officers hand out about five uctn al
procedure," Sorensen said. million parking tickets a year,V
"There's no question about it. and less than half have been paid Wilson said his one-day meeti
We're not going to deal with these voluntarily. with Johnson in Washington la
hoodlum elements or teenagers. The last day for the amnesty week "ranged widely and deep
We're not going to listen to a lot was Monday, and the 60 000 pieces over the entire field of mt
of grievances that have been of mail that poured in brought national affairs, economically
chewed over and over again." $1,260,000. well as politically."

De-
,hat
Drell
dia
ith
om
VIc-
eal
ns,
si-
ude
rth
ar-
es-
had
ire
nt"
the
ing
ast
ply
er-
as

mric
ent
in-
on.
id-
ted
fur-
tri-
Tar

The Nuremburg Code presents a
strong recommendation, developed
to prevent a recurrance of the
Nazi German concentration camp
experiments. In extensive wording,
the Code advocates that the volun-
tary consent of the subject is es-
sential. It defines the extent to
which a patient should be inform-
ed of the nature and danger of
the work and exhorts the one who
engages in the experiment to take
this upon himself as a personal
responsibility.'
The Nuremburg document is not
binding by law in America and its
precepts are often hazed over by
clinical researchers. In fact, the
writer of the Saturday Review
article which quoted Kretch noted
that in ,gathering information, he
had found several doctors, includ-
ing one on the New York State
Medical Society Malpractice Re-
view Board, who had never heard
of the Nuremburg Code. Many of
those he interviewed, however,
gave their personal definitions of
propriety in experimentation and
these were quite inclusive.
The variation in their defini-
tions was striking. The wide range
of ideas which prevail among doc-
tors perhaps explains the difficul-
ty they encounter in attempting to
draft a uniform standard. The
problem seems stifling and the
implications frightening.
Yet some officials are searching
for means to ensure safety and
unity of purpose in the medical
profession.
TOMORROW: Who they are and what
they are doing.

States
time at
outside
of Hai-
Wash-
Nam
raided
sedimi-
I quar-
in the
miles
he city.
state-
to in-
d:
nissions,
)L (pe-
gets in
these
ist the
a. Pre-
pilots
on tar-
n that
t. The
ie.
to say
said.
Hanoi,

the North Vietnamese capital, said North Vietnamese army high com-
six U.S. planes were shot down mand protested to the Interna-
over Haiphong and one over the tional Control Commission against
adjacent province of Hal Duong the "extremely savage crimes
The U.S. has not announced the against the Vietnamese people."
loss of any planes in the raids. Hanoi declared the Haiphong
The U.S. has ordered its fighter area raid Tuesday was "an im-
bombers to stay clear of both pudent flouting" of the Geneva
Haiphong and Hanoi. agreements of 1954 that set up a
Although North Viet Nam claim- divided Viet Nam and established
ed that the target of the raid was the International Control Com-
the port of Haiphong, the Soviet mission-made up of India, Can-
news agency Tass said in a dis- ada and Poland-to supervise the
patch from Hanoi that North Viet truce.
Nam protested the "bombing of :........
Haiphong suburbs."
The North Vietnamese also
charged that U.S. planes Monday#
bombed the Thai Nguyen iron and1
steel complex, one of the most
important industrial facilities in . : s ': {"rc::.::-".:"::"::::"a::{" {. M;s
the country.
Ith counthrThe Daily Official Bulletin is an
It was the first such claim from official publication of the Univer-
Hanoi. There was no announce- sity of Michigan for which The
ment in Saigon of such a raid. Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
the bombings hit "many populated Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
areas and economic establishments fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication adb ~.Fia
and "what is particularly serious, for Saturday andSbyn p.m. Feneral
U.S. aircraft bombed a number of Notices may be published a maxi-
installations of the Thai Nguyen mum of two times on request; Day
,,t eCalendar items appear once only.
iron and steel complex" Student organization notices are not
A Hanoi broadcast said the accepted for publication.

t
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4
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Phone 482-2056
s
etw"e Ok CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7:00
NOW SHOWING
/00071"," at S-,w m~

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rF" .................. ..r::A v.:.. :" "...... ........ . ... . , .. ...... .. .... :.*.*v }t... . . r.1 .: ..:

t.

)ns Attract
ng Num bers

get to
y findI
resting
es.
legend
ed pro-
tifying
has bit
hinted
o stu-
precia-
think
by the
While
be at a
ern-day
ogiuzes
, John
rr-re-
arvard,
acation
of the
usiness
ve and
e'-y is-
attract
ts di,-

played their faith in youth
through the Peace Corps, and
youth responded, while the con-
servatives carped." Too often, he
added, the conservatives represent
industry and "lately, industrial-
ists have made a habit of rein-
forcing this impression."
He cited their performance
before Congressional committees
such as when a young, research-
and public-service-minded lawyer,
Ralph Nader, took up the fight for
auto safety and industry tried to
discredit him.
"We have built our railroads
and opened the West, but we
haven't reached the moon as yet,"
the Cornell official added,
Of course, industry is a key ele-
ment in the journey to the moon,
and increasing numbers of up-to-
date industrialists, instead of en-
gaging in a Cold War with govern-
ment, join Washington in running
the Job Corps. But-implied the
Harvard and Cornell experts--not
enough of the business spokesmen
realize that in this, the public
service and technological adven-
ture side of their potential, is the
appeal to the cream of youth.
Reprinted by permission of N.Y. Timesi

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview - "Long Day's Journey" and
"Wild River": Multipurpose Room, Un-
dergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Performance - Noel Coward's "Blithe
Spirit": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Wayne Hamilton, trombonist: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Sept. 16. Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
not later than Thurs., Sept. 1.
PLANS FOR SUMMER
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
Sunday, Aug. 7, 1966, 2 p.m.
Time of Assembly-1:15 p.m.
Places of Assembly-Regents, Presi-
dent and other executive officers, min-
ister, speaker, candidate for Regents'
citation, and candidate for honorary
degree, in the Kalamazoo Room of the
Michigan League where they may robe.
IDeans and other administrative of-
ficials taking active part in the exer-
cises, in the Michigan Room of the
Michigan League, where they may robe.
Members of the faculties in Room
2071 Natural Science Bldg., where they
may robe.
Students of the various schools and
colleges, in Natural Science Bldg. as
follows:
Section A-Literature, Science, and
Arts - Front part of auditorium,
west section.
-Education-Front part of auditor-
lum, center section.
-Architecture-Front part of audi-
torium, east section.
-Law-Front part of auditorium,
east section (behind Architecture).

Section B-Graduate - PhD candi-
dates, Room 1053.
-Masters candidates, rear part of
auditorium.
Section C-Engineering-Room 2054.
-Business Administration - Room
2042.
-Music-Room 2033 (north end).
-Nursing-Room 2033 (south end, be-
hind Music).
-Public Health-Foom 2023 (west
end).
-Social Work-Room 2023 (center,
behind Public Health).
-Natural Resources-Room 2023 (east
end, behind Social Work).
March Into Hill Auditorium: 1:45 p.m.
Academic dress,
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
Crandall English, Physics; thesis: "A
High-Resolution Measurement of the
Hyperfine Structure of the J-1 Rota-
tional State of Cs133F19 by the Molecu-
lar-Beam Electric-Resonance Method,"
Wed., Aug. 3, Room 629 Physics-Astron-
omy Bldg., at 10 a.m. Chairman, J. C.
Zorn.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
City of San Diego, Calif.-Librarians
working in the extension division, re-
sponsible for children's work in large
branch, or take full charge of a small-
er branch. Grad from school of Lib.
Sci., or Lib. Arts degree with 24 semes-
ter hours of library training.

Local Laboratory, Ann Arbor - Re-
search Asst., BS courses or exper. in
quantitative analysis, or Med. Tech.
trng. Man or woman, begin Sept. or
Oct. No other exper. required.
- Local Research Project, Ann Arbor-
Research Asst Familiar with electronics
or machine shop or general lab tech.
Could be undergraduate.
M . * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Thee following schools have vavancies
for the 1966-67 school year:
Belleville, Mich.-Chem., Librarian.
Bell River, Ontario, Canada - 9th
grade Math.
Chelsea, Mich.-J.H. Engl./Art or Sci-
ence
Garden City, Mich.-st, 2nd, J.H.
Math/Sci.. J.H. Comm./Bus. Math, J.H{.
Engl.n/SS, H.S. Id Arts, H.S. French,
Emot Dist
Highland Park, Mich. - Art, Speech
The rapy', Psychol., Diag.
Lockport, N.Y.-J.H. English.
Ortonviile, Mich.-Lower Elem., J.H.
Science, Sec. Ind. Arts, H.S. Band.
Saginaw, Mich.-H S.: Biol., Counse-
lor, Engl./Journ., Geog.; J.H.: Girls
Phys. Ed.
Southgate, Mich.-3rd, 1st, 5th, 6th,
Lower Elem. Type A.
Sylvania, Ohio-J.H. Counselor, Elem.
Art, H S. Hist./Football, 7th grade
SS/Engl. or Engl./SS, Elem. Music,

6th grade (man), 2nd grade.
Washington, Ill.-- Primary,
Math.
* * *

Science/

For additional information contact
Miss Collins, Bureau of Appointments,
Education Div., 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered stundent or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Mid-
term Frolic, Thurs., Aug. 4, 8 p.m.,
1429 Hill St.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, book review: "Faces of
Poverty" by Arthur Simon, and "To
Mend the Broken" by Karl Tutze, Wed.,
Aug. 3, 9 p.m.; devotion service: "Chris-
tian Goals in Interpersonal Relation-
ships," by Rev. Scheidt;10 p.m.

ALSO
TOtNY CURTIS SIDNEY POTTIER
Shown at
11.00 Only
PLUS-IN COLOR
"CHAMPION STUNT DRIVERS"
2 COLOR CARTOONS

IMPORTANT! NO ONE UNDER 18 WILL BE ADMITTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY HIS PARENT.
EM .Zi ET
0 ERNEST LEMMAN'S PRODUCTION
OF EDWARD ALBEE'S
EFEEE is
VhEA1 ® NI y
WUr Mn MF7

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Shows at 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Matinees $1.25

DIAL 5-6290

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DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
NJUGAL
....w. .1 ,..

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STEVE M0IUEEN L
KARL MAWEN
AAIIII KRITAl

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STREET DANCE
On

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NOw-a name
-"7B.oon
a legend.

"AN AMUSING GAME OF CO
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