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July 21, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-21

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THURSDAY. JULY 21, 1966

THIS MICHIGAN DAII.V

PAGE,

THURSDAY. JULY Z1, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pa aIa

Johnson Asks

Red

Cross

~Help(
Proposes
Conference
OnU.S.Fliers
Calls for Fuller
Application of 1949
Geneva Conventions
WASHINGTON (A') - President
Johnson yesterday assailed as re-
volting, repulsive and deplorable
Hanoi's threats to try captured
American fliers as war criminals.
But he shied away from counter-
threats and offered to talk in-
stead.-
"We are ready," he said, "to sit
down at a conference table under
the sponsorship of the Interna-
tional Committee of the Red
Cross, to discuss ways in which
the Geneva conventions of 1949
can be given fuller and more com-
plete application in Viet Nam."
These conventions provide that
prisoners of war-whether a de-
clared or undeclared war-must be
protected against acts of violence
or intimidation and against in-
sults and public curiosity.
Officials said later that this
willingness has been conveyed to
the North Vietnamese through
roundabout diplomatic channels.
Johnson said, though, that there
is no indication Hanoi wants to
iscuss prisoners, peace, or any-
thing else.
Meanwhile, he said, more man-
power will be needed in Viet Nam.

n

War

Criminals'

Wage, Price
Freeze Now
In Britain
Brown Threatens To
Resign Over Internal
Spending Austerity
LONDON ()-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson yesterday announc-
ed stringent economic measures
that could hit Britons with the
bleakest austerity since World War
II and affect British support of
the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-
nization.
The time has come "for every
one of us to earn a full day's pay
by putting in a -full day's work,"
Wilson told the nation in a broad-
cast last night. It followed his
call in the House of Commons for
a freeze on wages, prices and div-
idends. He slashed the nation's
spending by nearly $2 billion in a
bid to save the pound.
Wilson's chief economic expert,
Deputy Prime Minister George
Brown, who favors a policy of ex-
pansion, at first threatened to re-
sign, posing the Labor government
with a major crisis. But then
Brown said- he would stay on and
fight to make success of the gov-
ernment's policies.
In an offshoot of the far-rang-
ing program, Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer James Callaghan flew
immediately to Bonn to ask West
Germany to picg up the foreign
exchange tab for the 51,000-strong
British Rhine army.
Callaghan said he and West
German Finance Minister Rolf
Dahlgruen were "going to exam-
ine the very heavy costs of keep-
ing our troops and airmen" in
Germany, heartland of a NATO al-
liance already hit with French
President de Gaulle's decision to
withdraw.
Asked if he brought an ultima-
tum for Bonn to pay or face with-
drawal, Callaghan replied: "We
have no ultimatum for allies and
friends."
Wilson'sadvisers felt the impact
of the government's new austerity
program would be dulled if not lost
in the nation if it had been accom-
panied by Brown's resignation.
Labor members of Parliament
were reported to have joined in a
* move urging Brown to remain. A
number of them signed a motion
asking him not to quit.
A central feature of the govern-
ment's new emerkency program
was a call by Wilson for a wage-
prive-dividend standstill with the
aim of stablizing the economy.
Other measures will have the ef-
fect of cutting back public and
private investment at home and
abroad and introducing a vast
range of curbs to limit the runa-
way spending power of the British
people. All this cuts across the ex-
pansionism for which Brown has
fought in policymaking.
The program hit the heavily
burdened British taxpayer with a
10 per cent increase in some taxes.
It jolted the man in the street
hard with new taxes and curbs,
ranging from more expensive cig-
arettes, beer and gasoline to
tougher installment buying terms.
-r--

-Associated Press
YOUNGSTERS AND ADULTS SURGE THROUGH the door and smashed window of a drug store
in the Hough area of Cleveland, which was hit by rioting, looting, fire-bombing and vandalism last
night for the second night in a row. The Ohio National Guard was called out to help quell the
disturbances.
Guardsmen Seal Hough in
Effort To End Cleveland Riots

LACK OF FUEL:
Gemini Space Walk Cut Short

CAPE KENNEDY (P) - Gemini
10 pilot Michael Collins cut short
a dramatic cosmic escapade 247
miles above earth yesterday when
his spaceship ran low on pre-
cious fuel trying to stay close to
an old, powerless rocket.
He spent less than half the time
he wanted to on his celestial stroll,
but did have time to become the
first man ever to touch another
satellite caught in space.
Yesterday's adventure was a
high spot of the bold three-day
journey in space.
Walk Shortened
For about half an hour, Collins
was a breathing, talking, human
satellite of the earth - flicking
around with a nifty space gun. But
the order came: "Get back in."
Mission control issued the or-
der when command pilot John W.
Young began using too much fuel
from the already low tanks trying
to stay close to the Agena rocket
-bled of all its power. Gemini 10
caught the dead rocket earlier in
the day after a space chase from
record heights.
Officials wanted to make sure
Young and Collins had ample pow-
er to get back down today from
the 247-mile-high orbit for a
splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean.
No Problems-At First
Collins, the fourth man ever to
leave an orbiting vehicle, had
planned to stay out 55 minutes,
and things went flawlessly at first.
He plugged a nitrogen fuel line
into his space gun to give it power
to flash him around while he was
connected to a lifeline feeding him
spacecraft oxygen.
The eager astronaut edged over
to the Agena a few feet away while
Young steered the spaceship, fir-
ing its tiny jets.
"Everything outside is about
like we predicted only it takes
more time for body positioning.
This is indeed a problem. Although
the nitrogen line got connected
without too much of a problem,
when I translated over to the Age-
na, I found that the lack of a
hand hold is a big impediment.
Only Hanging On
"I could hang on but I couldn't
get around to the other side where
I wanted to go. Finally I did get
the S-10 package and the nose
fairing both off."
The S-10 was a panel-like ex-
periment tacked to one side of the
Agena that hopefully has collect-
ed valuable information on micro-
meteorites in space by measuring
the number of hits.
"However there's a piece of the
shroud hanging or rather the nose
of the Agena which came loose,"
he continued.
"And I was afraid I would get
snarled up in that, and so was
John.
He told me to come on back."
As a result, Collins did not get
a chance to install a new micro-
meteorite plate for an astronaut
on one of the later Gemini flights
to retrieve. Instead, he said, he
just tossed it into the limitless
void.
Camera Lost
"Also, I lost my Eva Hasselblad,
I'm sorry to say," Collins added,

meaning the still camera he was said: "I have no idea where it
to use to take pictures of the Collins slipped outside w
earth, the spaceship and anything uracticed smoothness into a v
he saw of interest. that makes a man feel as if r
By the time the end came the immersed in jelly. He and Yoi
capsule was down to 110 pounds of tackled the difficult task w
fuel, less than 10 per cent of the eagerness, although the low f
fuel and near the minimum re- supply had been a point of conc
quired for them to save for the throughout the day.
critical maneuvers necessary to Because Young and Coll
bring them down to a proper orbit burned excessive amounts of f
for splashdown. their first night in space, t1
Once Collins got back inside, was doubt for a while if t:
Young was told to fire the space- would even attempt the sec(
craft jets to race away from the rendezvous which set the st
Agena. But, the command pilot for Collins' walk.
U.S. Losing Planes at Rat(
Close to That of Korean Wa
WASHINGTON (W) - Commu- reference points. For accuracy,
nist anti-aircraft guns in Viet ' must make his runs at subsc
Nam are knocking down U.S. war- speeds.
planes at the rate almost identi- So the pilot attacking groi
cal with that of the Korean War. targets where accuracy is man
While the U.S. aircraft involv- tory is the same old sitting d
ed in the Viet Nam operations are he's always been.
vastly superior to those used in The Soviet-supplied surface
Korea, so are the enemy ground air missiles, on the other ha
defenses. have so far been relatively ineff
Further, the air effort to im- tive. They operate most efficier
pede the movement of Communist at altitudes over 10,000 feet.
troops and supplies to the fight- There is some speculation in
ing front in Viet Nam seems to be Pentagon, that the Soviets h;
about as successful-or unsuccess-- withheld more advanced miss
ful, depending on the viewpoint- from Hanoi lest the United Sta
as it was in the 1950-53 conflict. learn too much about jamm
During the first full year of air their guidance radar.
war over Viet Nam, North and In Korea the United Sta
South, the Defense Department completely dominated the st
reported, the United States lost over the north. Despite this,
386 fixed-wing aircraft - 286 of Chinese supported a million-n
them over the North. army at the end of a 250-r

e

F

He did not say how much. By The Associated Press being inspired by professional agi- Gunfire killed a woman Monday
Persistence National Guardsmen sealed off a tators, but added that wherever night and a man Tuesday night.
"I have said 'to the American violence-wracked Negro section there is trouble, there are individ- Both were Negroes.
people time and again, and I re- in Cleveland, Ohio, yesterday in uals under suspicion. In cases of Between 300 and 400 Guardsmen
peat it today," the President said a move to prevent further rioting violence, he added, there usually patrolled in Jeeps and on foot dur-
in firm tones, "we shall persist, after two killings in two nights. are found people "who do not ap- ing the day in the Hough section
We will send Gen. William C. But as troops patrolled the prove of our system" who contri- where ruins still smoked.
Westmoreland such men as he will streets, another fire broke out and bute to the disorders. Crowds of Negroes stood watch-
require and request, and they will there was scattered looting of Johnson said, as he has said be- ing the soldiers along Hough Ave.
be amply supplied and will give ruined stores. fore, that he is "not interested gwhich runs through the heart of
a good account of themselves." Guardsmen clamped tight re- in black power or white power, the trouble area, two square miles
In response to a question abouts but in democratic power, with a of slums three miles east of down.
recurring suggestions that the Hrictions on auto traffic in the small 'd'., town Clnd
United States again halt bombings Hough area, Only residents orm- "We must recognize," he added, evelan.
of North Viet Nam, Johnson said permitted on official business were "that while there is a Negro mi- Several Guardsmen quietly dis-
he didn't think Americans should through the security ring.nority of 10 per cent in this coun- persed a crowd that formed after
be spending all their time talking ,, try, there's a majority of 90 per some Negro boys jumped into a
about what this government might "We are going to restore order, cent who are not Negroes, but truck and grabbed cartons of ice
be willing to do without the slight- Mayor Ralph S. Locher said grim- who want to see justice and equal- cream. The truck was loading
est indication of what the enemy ly after meeting with the com- ity given their fellow citizens-in goods from a fire-wrecked and
might be willing to do. mander of nearly 2000 troops call- an orderly manner and without looted store.
Johnson staged the news confer- ed up Tuesday. violence. In a three-block stretch of

l
t

Inthree full years of war in Ko-
rea, the United States lost 1,109
aircraft to ground fire--550 Air
Force, 559 Navy and Marine. Of
the total 652 were World War II
propeller types. The annual loss
rate was 369.
The figures come from the Pen-
tagon's Office of Statistics.
Air statisticians measure losses
also against exposure to enemy
fire-combat flights or sorties. The
more exposure, the higher the ex-
pected losses.
Quite probably the annual sortie
rate in Viet Nam against ground
targets will be close to Korea's,
especially with the present policy
of limitation on targets. It has left
pilots mostly with what they call
"cheap targets"--trucks, military
depots, bridges, roads and rail-
roads.
In their anti-aircraft war, the
North Vietnamese are using weap-
ons ranging from .60 caliber to
85mm plus some guided missiles.
They apparently have ample
stocks.
They apparently are also well-
equipped with advanced radar and
with radar that controls the aim-
ing of guns.
Air strike tactics for jets have
not changed appreciably since the
Korean War. A jet can't come in
at treetop level in pin-point bomb-
ing runs because the high ap-
proach speed would prevent the
pilot from seeing the target and
using landmarks as navigational

says:
"Film-Making at its
Marvelous Best!
Genuinely Entertaining!"
PLAYBOY are
"Movie-Making
at its Inventive Best!
Glamorous, Exciting...
Pure Fun"

supply line. They went un
ground and supplies were mc
on the backs of thousands of c
ies.

t
r
{

ence in the White House East In Washington, President John-
Room before scores of reporters on son yesterday urged citizens'
hand in person and the micro- against violence. He called for co-,
phones of all the national radio operation with authorities in riot-
and television networks. struck cities to remedy "evil con-
He didn't have any of his cus- ditions."
tomary announcements. The first The President told questioners
question bored in on Viet Nam and that he would not wish to say that
the prisoners of war. And the con- protests and demonstrations are
ference kept coming back to them.,
On the strike of 35,000 machin-
ists against fivedmay orairlines, W orld N e w
that, "The President has taken all
the steps he could under the law." f
He voicedi a hope that negotia-
tions would continue round the By The Associated Press;
clock to end a strike he said is WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen.,
trying the patience of the people, Nicholas Katzenbach said yester-
who deserve to be served. day that legislation aimed at al-

The sealing off of the Houvh}
area cut the size of Negro crowds{
on the streets.I
Locher and Maj. Gen. Erwin C.
Hostetler, commading the Nation-
al Guard, said troops will remain
as long as needed to keep downa
the firebombings, shootings and?
looting.
s Roundup
said a union plan to recess for a

Hough, there were six burned
buildings and five others with
smashed windows. Two fires still
smouldered.

I

Gov. James A. Rhodes, acting on
request of the mayor, called up 2,-
000 Guardsmen, said John M. Mc-
Elroy, an aide of the governor in
Columbus. But McElroy said the
actual duty force would be 1,750
men.
Rhodes, in a proclamation sign-
ed late Tuesday night, declared a
state of emergency in the destruc-
tion-littered Hough section. He
said he would activate as many
Guardsmen as needed, on request
of city authorities.

vote of the 35,000 strikers was

Other Topics
As the questioning rolled on,
other topics came up:
Politics-Johnson said he will be
out there campaigning this fall,
and will "take advantage of every
opportunity to go out to the coun-
try and explain our programs" and
"ask for support."
Tight Money - Johnson said
that, "We are seriously concerned
with the plight of the home build-
er. We are distressed at increased
costs from high interest rates."
The best thing that can be done,
he said, is for Congress to act on
legislation the Treasury recoin-
mended.
Communist China-UN - The
President gave no direct answer to
a question pegged to admitting
Communist China to the United
Nations alongside Nationalist Chi-
na. He voiced a hope that "at a
not too distant date mainland
4 China will be willing to perhaps
come nearer to abiding by the
principles laid down in the United
Nations Charter."
Western Heisphere - Staff
work and discussion of topics are
under way for a Western Hem-
isphere summit meeting but so far
M "we do not have a date or a
place,"
He said he would be glad to go
to a meeting and would do so,
after proper preparations.
All these were secondary sub-
jects to the war in Viet Nam, in
which Johnson said the Commu-
nists have been losing 10 men to
our one for 10 weeks now, and to
the threats from Hanoi to try as
war criminals the 45 U.S. airmen
the Pentagon says it holds as cap-
tives.

leged terrorism and violence by'
members of the Ku Klux Klan
"might unnecessarily complicate;
prosecution of the perpetrators of
such violence."
Katzenbach told the House
Committee on Un-American Activ-,
ities that "there are constitution-
al difficulties and problems" with
some aspects of the legislation
sponsored by Rep. Edwin E. Willis
(D-La), the committee's chairman.
Despite Katzenbach's criticism,
early approval is expected for the
bill which Willis introduced after
the committee's six-month inves-
tigation of Klan activities.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The House
passed and sent to the Senate yes-
terday a $58.6 billion defense ap-
propriat-ion bill, swollen almost $1
billion beyond the amount Presi-
dent Johnson requested.
The unrequested funds included
$153.3 million for procurement
programs for the Nike-X anti-mis-
sile system still being developed.
WASHINGTON - Airline strike
talks continued last night after
President Johnson urged round-
the-clock negotiations and Secre-
tary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz
Kenneth Tynan of
'The New Yorker" called
A THURBER
(CARNIVAL
".. . easily the funniest
show on Broadway ..."

7
l
1
I
a
1
1
A

"pointless."
While the striking machinists
union made no formal withdrawal
of its plan to present the latest
proposal of the five strikebound
airlines to an almost certain voter
rejection, negotiations continued
under the stepped-up federal pres-
sure aimed at ending the 14-day-
old strike.
HAVANA-Prime Minister Fi-
del Castro says schools for board-
ing students of all ages are being
built in Pinar del Rio, Las Villas
and Oriente provinces.
One purpose of the schools is to
free women from housework and
put them to work as "producers
for the revolution" in factories and
fields where needed, he added.
"When these institutions are es-
tablished, 100 per cent of the wom-
en in physical condition to do so
will be able to join in production,"
Castro told a school meeting at
Topes de Collnantes in eastern
Cuba.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

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