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July 12, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-12

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TUESDAY, JULY 12,1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 'T'HREE

TUESDAY, JULY 12, 1 9 6 6 Till MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Spokesmen Report
In Airline Strike T

'No

Progress'

egotiations

WASHINGTON (P)-
tions intended to haltf
old strike against five
lines went nowhere ye
were recessed overnigh
ing hope for any earlys
Union, company a

- Negotia- ment spokesmen agreed there was
a four-day- no progress yesterday and Wil-
major air- liam J. Curtin, chief spokesman
sterday and for the carriers, told reporters
t amid fad- "there appears to be no basis to
settlement. be hopeful for an early settle-
nd govern- Iment."

world News Roundup

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Bureau of
Labor Statistics said yesterday
that strike idleness in May reach-
ed the highest level for the month
since 1959.
About half the month's idleness
resulted from stoppages in the
construction industry.
The Labor Department's sta-
tistical agency said strikes in May
accounted for 2.9 million man-
days of idleness or 0.26 per cent
of the estimated total working
time.
The bureau said that thus far
in 1966 strikes have resulted in
8.5 million man-days of idleness,
about the same level as in the
corresponding period of last year.
BOMBAY, India-City and state
officials decided yesterday large-
scale voluntary evacuation of this
great seaport will be recommended
next Friday unless monsoon down-
pours replenish irying reservoirs

by then. The city population
estimated at 4.5 million.

is

Drastic water conservation meas-
ures were ordered meanwhile.
* * *
OXFORD, Miss. - Civil rights
attorneys filed suit in U.S. District
Court yesterday to enjoin opera-
tion of the Selective Service law
in Mississippi because no Negroes
serve on draft boards.
The suit was filed on behalf of
Ulysses Z. Nunnally, 20, a Holly
Springs Negro. He was drafted last
month by the Marshall County
draft board and was scheduled for
induction in the Army today.
* *~ *
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. -
United Nations diplomats reacted
cautiously yesterday to a Repub-
lican party report in Washington
proposing steps to strengthen the
United Nations. Because of its
criticism of the Johnson adminis-
tration, it was labelled by some
here as a political campaign docu-
ment.

Joseph W. Ramsey, vice-presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO Internation-
al Association of Machinists, also
reported no progress, as did As-
sistant Secretary of Labor James
Reynolds.
Reynolds decided to omit a
night conference and instead ask-
ed the parties to return at 10 a.m.
(EDT) today.
Ray of Hope
Late in the afternoon there was
one small ray of encouragement
when the union negotiators de-
parted to gather, at Reynolds' re-
quest, data on the costs involved
in their wage increase and other
demands.
Reynolds explained to newsmen
he had asked the union to de-
velop cost figures that could be
compared with those submitted
previously by the airlines in con-
nection with their estimate that
granting union demands would in-
crease airline expenses by $11 mil-
lion.
Observers considered this action
by the union to be at least one
small step forward in the talks.
Demands Unchanged
Curtin said the union has not
modified its demands in any way
since they were submitted July 7,
immediately before the strike.
Curtin said that since the air-
lines have agreed to go beyond
the wage increases recommended
by the presidential emergency
board, the airlines now expect the
union to modify their demands.
When the negotiations opened at
10 a.m., the union spokesman dis-

tributed mimeographed copies of
a statement contending that the
airlines had not negotiated mean-
ingfully.
Beyond Recommendation
William J. Curton, chief nego-
tiator for the five airlines, said
in rebuttal that the airlines not
only had accepted the terms pro-
posed by a presidential emergency
board--which President Johnson
had characterized as offering the
framework for a just settlement-
but even had gone beyond those
terms.
Here in brief are the chief is-
sues in the strike:
i Union Demands: Wage in-
creases of about 53 cents an hour
over a three-year contract period.
Present pay scales range from
$2.25 to $3.52 an hour. The union
also asks for a cost-of-living al-
lowance.
* Companies' Original Offer:
Wage increases of about 30 cents
an hour over three years, with no
cost-of-living clause.
* Presidential Emergency Board
Recommended: Increases of about
44 to 48 cents an hour over three
years, with the right to reopen
the contract if the cost of living
rises one per cent by December
1967. The companies agreed to the
wage figure and later went a little
beyond it, but the union rejected
the board's proposal.
Also in dispute are vacations,
holidays, hours and overtime spay,
health and welfare plans and pen-
sions, but the wage question is re-
garded as the central issue.

virginia Vote
May Unseat
Eneumbents
Liberals Challenge
Old-Timers Today in
Democratic Primary
RICHMOND, Va. (WP)-A hard-
fought Democratic primary cam-
paign grinds to an end in today's
showdown between the tradition-
al conservatism of the Byrd orga-
nization and its moderate-to-
liberal challengers.
In a 13-hour voting period, an
estimated half million voters will
decide whether the Democrats will
stick by both its U.S. senators and
a key House figure or recast the
Virginia image in Congress.
Robertson Challenged
Senior Sen. A. Willis Robertson,
79, the Senate's 11th ranking
member, was battled down to the
wire by State Sen. William B.
Spong, a Portsmouth attorney,
Sen. Harry F. Byrd, Jr., ap-
pointed last year to succeed his
ailing and now critically-ill father,
faces the challenge of a former
State Senate colleague, Armistead
L. Boothe of Alexandria for the
four years remaining in Byrd Sr.'s
unexpired term.
And rounding out the main
events of the primary, Rep. How-
ard W. Smith, 83, chairman of
the House Rules Committee, is
shooting for a 19th consecutive
term.. He faces one of his few
real tests in the challenge of
George C. Rawlings, Jr. Rawlings,
a liberal, is an attorney also and
a member of the Virginia House.
The incumbents were generally
favored but some knowledgeable
politicians said if there was to be
an upset it appeared Spong had
the best chance of scoring it.
THANK YOU
U-M Barber Customers
and friends for your
patronage. We now
WELCOME you to the
DASCOLA BARBERS near
the Michigan Theater.
-Dominic Dascola
Michigan Lit '36

By The Associated Press
There is room for cautious op-
timism that a United States hunch
about the Viet Nam war has been
justified. Red China displays no
eagerness for direct military in-
volvement which might risk a
showdown with the Americans.
And Secretary of Defense Rob-
ert S. McNamara said yesterday
the United States now is produc-
ing air munitions so much faster
than they are being burned inViet
Nam that he is ordering a $1-bil-
lion cutback in production.
Within a year, he said, the
United States will have an air
ordnance inventory of 500,000 tons.
His assertions came only three
months after reports, some of
which appeared in print, that the
Air Force in Viet Nam was suf-
fering severe ordnance shortages.
Denies Charges
Answering questions, McNamara
denied Russian charges that three
Soviet vessels had been endan-
gered or damaged by the air as-
saults on the oil storage facilities
near Haiphong last week.
The Hanoi regime can hardly be
wildly enthusiastic about the re-
sponses of either Red China or the
Soviet bloc to the intensified U.S.
air war.
From time to time in the past
two years, following the escala-
tion which brought the air war to
North Viet Nam, both the Rus-
sians and Red Chinese have open-
ly threatened to send volunteers
to fight the Americans.
DIAL 662-6264
ENDING WEDNESDAY
DIRECT FROM ITS RESERVED
SEAT ENGAGEMENTS!
I TTIE AT POPUAR PR

Now, the Russians announce thatx
because of the U.S. bombings in
the outskirts of Hanoi and Hai-
phong, Soviet teams won't play
with American teams in track,
field and basketball events, as
scheduled this month. That will
hardly make the North Vietnamese
regime stand up and cheer.
The Chinese, for their part, have
advised the Vietnamese Commu-
nists not to depend on outside
help, but to be prepared to "carry
on the struggle by themselves."
This is a great deal different from
Chinese statements of 1965.

A year and a half ago, shortly
after the air war was brought to
North Viet Nam, Peking told the
United States, "We are waiting
for you in battle array," and spoke
ominously of Korea, referring to
the 1950 intervention there by Chi-
nese "volunteers."
Now Peking has elected to view
the most punishing U.S. attacks
of all, close to North Viet Nam's
capital and its chief port, as a
sign of American weakness -and
an indication that "U.S imperial-
ism has come to the end of its
tether

VIET NAM:
Chinese Avoid Involvement;
McNamara Predicts Cutback

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, JULY 12
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Freeway Phobia I, Freeway
Phobia II, One Got Fat" and "Signs
Take a Holiday": Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
General Notices
Student Identification Cards: Stu-
dents who enrolled for the first time
in the summer half-term and who will
be continuing in the fall term, should
have a student identification card.
These continuing students may secure
an identification card by making appli-
cation at Window A of the Office of
the Registrar in the lobby of the Ad-
ministrationBldg. during regular work-
ing hours Monday through Friday. All
students will be required to have an
identification card in order to register
during fall registration, Aug. 29-31, 1966.
Doctoral Examination for Leonard
Norman Schoenberg, Chemistry; thes-
is: "Optically Active Complexes of Co-
bait (III) with Asymmetric Tetraden-
tate Ligands," Wed., July 13, Room
3003 Chemistry Bldg., at 1:30 p.m. Co.
Chairmen, C. F. Liu and D. W. Cooke.
Doctoral Examination for Jasper,
Braley Reid, Jr., History; thesis: "The
S Mephistopheles of Southern Politics": A
Critical Analysis of Some of the Poli-
tical Thought of Alexander Hamilton
Stephens, Vice-President of the Con-
federacy, Wed., July 13, Room 3609
Haven Hall, at 2:30 p.m. Chairman,
W. R. Leslie.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Huff
Plattner, Business Administration;I
^ thesis: "Fund Administration in the
Electric Utility Industry," Wed., July
13, Room 816 Bus. Admin., at 2 p.m.
Chairman, W. J. Elteman.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
4f tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Boon Peng Sim. director, Singapore
Peaple's Association, Singapore, July 10-
14.
Mrs. Boon Peng Sim (Quek Sok
Chang), English teacher in pre-univer-
sity classes, Nan Chian Girls' High
School, Singapore, July 10-14.
Mario Zagari, undersecretary for for-
eign affairs for Italy, July 12-13.
Maurice Ramanankasina, teacher of
French, secondary school, Tamatave,
Malagasy Republic, July 13-16.
*
DIAL 8-6416
Cooled by Refrigerotion
Ends Wednesday {.

Christian Desclercs, student at In-
stitute of Political Science at the Uni-
versity of Paris, and in Faculty of
Law, University of aPris, France, July
15-29.
Jose Maria Infante, member of the
Provincial Council of the Christian
Youth and secretary of the University
Department of Students, Argentina,
July 17-21.
Juan Carlos Labourdette, delegate to
the National Convention from the Uni-
versity Christian Democrats, and super-
visor at the Ministry of Labor and So-
cial Security, Argentina, July 17-21.
Juan Carlos Rosell, president of the
School of Economics Student Associa-
tion, Argentina, July 17-21.
Julio Ariel Sanchez. assistant, Histol-
ogy Department, School of Medicine,
and coordinator for the University
Team, Argentina, July 17-21,
Nguyen Quang Quynh, professor and
head of the Research and Documenta-
tion Division, National Institute of Ad-
ministration (NIA), Saigon, Viet Nam,
July 18.
* * -
Following are the names of faculty,
parents and group leaders who are
traveling in the United States with
50 French students from Aix-en-Prov-
ence, France, and who will be stay-
ing in Ann Arbor July 14-26.
Mrs. Cros, group leader, literature.
Mr. Aberlen, group leader, professor
of English.
Miss Clarion, professor in faculty of
sciences.
Mr. Chanter, professor of mathemat-
ics.
Mrs. Chanier, professor of literature.
Mr. Lantier, professor of philosophy
and Mrs. Lantier.
Mr. Dorne, professor of practical en-
gineering and Mrs. Dotne.
Mr. Rondeau, director, fire depart-
ment and Mrs. Rondeau, parents of
French student.

Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
WED.-THURS., JULY 13-14-
International Business Machines,
Dearborn, Mich.-Advisor positions to
users of IBM computer systems, sales,
stat., market. reps., systems prog. in
space, intelligence, command, commu-
nications, and fields of IBM product
dev, and engineering. BA/BS/MA/MS in
Astro., Chem., aMth, Physics, Engrg.
and all scientific disciplines. Call Bu-
reau of Appointments for appointments
with interviewer tomorrow and Thurs-
day, 764-7460.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Union Oil Co. of California, Los An-
geles, Calif.-Staff mgmt. oppor. avail-
able in Calif., Texas & Ill., for ChE
and ME with up to 8 yrs. exper., as
well as new grads.
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-Civil Engr. and architects for
Real Estate Dept., design work on new
stores working with outside contractors.
ME and Structural Engrs, for team
work on same.
Scott Paper Co., Philadelphia, Pa.--
New grad with transportation major.
Traffic Supervisoh-Transportation Serv-
ice. Knows. of Carrier operation &
tech, traffic distribution methods.
State of Idaho, DIept. of Highways-
Landscape Architect, classes II & III
for expand. prog. of roadside der. and
beaut. of rest areas and rel. highway
facilities.
Adult Psychiatric Center of North-
eastern Indiana, Fort Wayne, Ind.-Ad-
ministrative director for teamwork sys-
tem (psychiatry, psychology, social
work). PhD pref., not necessary if
extensive exper. in mental health pro-
gram and community mental health
organ. Administrative exper. desirable,
community agency exper.
Wood County Community Action Or-
ganization, Inc., Wood County, Wis. -

Executive Director. Degree in soc. sci,
or Bus. Ad. Oppor. for new programsj
in comm. action.
Oak Ridge Associated Universities,
Oak Ridge, Tenn.-Physics assistant for
developing exper. and equip. for sec-.
ondary schools. BS Phys. plus some
teaching exper. Health phys, assistant
for radiation safety and control courses.
BS plus some health hps. work. Phys.
assistant dev. of acceleration exper. for
undergrad instit. BS phys. 2 yrs. exper.
with Cockcroft-Walton accelerator.
Sunland Training Center, Miami, Fla.
-Director of Social Service Dept. for
new State Center for the Retarded.
MA and ASCW required. Work with
Admissions and Discharge Committees,
evaluate information on applicants, di-
recting other workers.
For further information please call
764-7460, Bureau of Appointments, 3200
SAB.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, "Free-
dom and Speech," Dr. Carl Cohen, Dept.
of Philosophy, Thurs., July 14, 8 p.m.,
1429 Hill St.
er Ccton 4am odern chn"
DIAL 5-6290

4

h

THIS WEEK ENRIwOIV 9
by LUIGT PiRANDELLO
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (department of speech)
8:00 p.m. in the
ENRI O IV air-conditioned 9
Lydia Mendelssohn
by LUIGI PIRANDELLO Theatre
tickets available for oil summer playbill shows
BOX OFFICE OPEN
Mon., Tues.
12:30-5:00EN I O V
Wed.-Sot.
12:30-8:00 by LUIGI PIRANDELLO
123-80

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Phone 482-2056
MI
6duug" 0*1 CARPENTER bDAS

The Area's Newest Drive-in is
easy to reach-2 miles South of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter Rd.
OPEN 7 P.M.

FIRST RUN-NOW SHOWING-ALL COLOR
THEY LIVE FROM SPINOUT TO CRACK UP!
F.AVALON
RMFUNICELLO
at 8:40 12:15 FABIAN
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A hilarious
romantic -
misadventure!
WALT DICNEYf
@16 Wal 0 stey Pr s a/ M5
ITde

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America's Funniest Family in their
FIRST FULL-LENGTH FEATURE
.RED GWYNNE YYON DECARLO-AtLLEWIS
BUTC PARICKandDEBIIASON
also stang
TERRY-THOMAS- HERMIONE GINGOLD
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
AND
FULL-LENGTH
CARTOON
FEATUREINM
COLOR!I
A Swallow Ltd-Benlsion Production - A Unversal eas
STARTS WEDNESDAY
UNIVERSITY DRIVE-IN

EATTLE UF
THE BULGE
ULTRA-PANAVISION*
TECHNICOLOR*
FROM WARNER BROS.
* Thursday
Jerry Lewis in
"3 ON A COUCH"

$5.00 DEPOSIT HOLDS RESERVED SEATS

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NAI FY -
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Campus Financial Wizards ..
do all their banking at Ann Arbor Bank. They appreciate the economy
and convenience of Ann Arbor Bank's Specialcheck checking accounts
.. you pay just 1Oc for each check you write ... there's no service
charge eitherl Campus financial wizards also appreciate the fact that
Ann Arbor Bank has 3 campus offices . . . and soon to be four .. .
to serve their complete banking needs. If you're not a CFW (Campus
Financial Wizard) see Ann Arbor Bank soon.

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