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July 06, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-06

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WEDNESDAY, 3ULY 6,196e

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 1 9 G~ TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PA4~K THRV1~

i 411,!11% 1 L11V1.%Y

Sukarno Now Figurehead

Us.,.

Japan

As

Su harto Gains

JAKARTA, Indonesia (/P)-The
Indonesian Congress stripped Pres-
ident Sukarno of authority to
name cabinet members yesterday,
possibly marking the leader's fin-
al eclipse. The army was alert to
block any pro-Sukarno move.
The Congress, the nation's
highest legal authority, also took
away Sukarno's titles of president
for life and Great Leader of the
Revolution.j
It granted broad new powers
to the army strongman, Lt. Gen.
Suharto, and declared Suharto
would be acting president if Su-
karno, 65, left the country or were
unable to perform his duties.
It was clear Sukarno would be
no more than a figurehead presi-
dent-if the congressional deci-
sions can be carried out by Suhar-
to and the civilian-military re-
gime now in control of this na-
tion of 3000 islands and 105 mil-
lion people.
Ruler Since 1945
Sukarno has been ruler of In-
donesia since independence from
the Netherlands was proclaimed
in 1945.
To forestall any move by Su-
karno or his followers to upset the
rulings, about 80,000 troops were
moved into position around Jakar-
ta Monday.
Other soldiers loyal to Suharto
were moved to eastern and central
Java, where "Bung," brother,
Karno grew up and retains wide
popularity.
Congress stated that Sukarno
and Suharto should work together
to form a new cabinet.
It also set up a committee to
review his teachings, which many
delegates declared led to the rise
of the Indonesia Communist par-
ty.
The Congress also ratified the
results of the recent Bangkok talks
between Indonesia and Malaysia
to re-establish normal relations
between the two countries.
'Crush Malaysia'
Sukarno launched a "Crush Ma-
laysia" campaign after the fed-
eration was formed three years
ago.
The campaign never proved ef-
fective. The Suharto group has
blamed it in part for Indonesia's
bankruptcy.
The major break in Sukarno's
power came Oct. 1 when Commu-
nists attempted a coup d'etat. Su-
karno was increasingly friendly
with Communist China and an-
tagonistic to the West and had
granted the Indonesian Commu-

nist party, then third largest in
the world, more and more lati-
tude.
The attempted coup was crush-
ed by the army, led by Defense
Minister Abdul Haris Nasution.
Thousands of Communists and
their sympathizers were slain.
In February, Sukarno ousted
Nasution as defense minister. Aft-

er massive and violent student
demonstrations in Jakarata, Su-
karno relinquished most of his
powers to Suharto on March 11.
In one of its first actions after
it convened in mid-June, the Con-
gress named Nasution as its chair-
man and confirmed Sukarno's
transfer of power to Suharto.
Radio Jakarta imposed a black-

Power
out on news of the congressional
action. Observers in Singapore,
where the radio is monitored, said
this apparently was aimed at pre-
venting word from reaching Su-
karno's followers in eastern and
central Java.
Sukarno has threatened to form
his own political party and cabinet
to fight for power.

Communist China To Support
North Viet Nam at 'All Risks'

TOYKO P)-Marshal Chen Yi,
foreign minister and vice premier
of the Peking regime, warned the
United States Tuesday that Com-
munist China is ready to defy "all
risks" in support of North Viet
Nam.
"The Chinese ptople, defying
all risks, are ready to take all
effective measures to support the
Vietnamese people, thoroughly to
smash the U.S. imperialist policies
of war and aggression, and carry
this struggle through to the end,"
Chen said.
He spoke at a reception given in
Peking by Algerian Charge d'
Affaires Mohamed Khouri, mark-
ing the fourth anniversary of Al-
geria's independence from France.
His speech was internationally dis-
tributed by the official New China
News Agency.
Chen did not elaborate on his
reference to defying all risks, and
it was not known whether he
meant that Communist China was
ready to get directly involved in
the Viet Nam war.
"The essence of the Viet Nam
question is armed aggression
against Viet Nam by U.S. im-
perialism," he said.
"Every country, every govern-
ment, every political party and
every statesman in the world will
inevitably be put to the test by
history and be examined by the
people on the Viet Nam question.
"They either side with the Viet-
namese people or side with U.S.
imperialism. The middle road is
. . a blind alley."
Chen repeated the Peking gov-
ernment's statement issued Sun-
day denouncing U.S. air strikes in
the Hanoi-Haiphong area and said1
China reaffirmed "its unswerving
determination to support the fra-
ternal Vietnamese people in fight-I
ing through to the end."

He charged that U.S. military
action had "pushed the war of
aggression to a new and still
graver stage."
"This barbarous and frenzied
act of aggression of the peoples
of China, Algeria and all other
countries of the world and called
forth unanimous condemnation,"
he said.
Earlier this week the Foreign
Ministry of Communist China
charged the United States with
"making active preparations for
sending its ground forces into
Laos."
The accusation, broadcast by the
Peking radio, was coupled with a
fresh outburst of invective over
the United States air raids on fuel
depots at Hanoi and Haiphong last
week.

The Foreign Ministry's state-
ment added:
At the instigation of the United
States, military personnel of Thai-
land and South Viet Nam have
successfully infiltrated into the
areas of central and lower Laos."
The statement did not say what,
if anything, the Chinese would do
to meet the alleged United States
challenge.
A statement by the Chinese gov-
ernment said that last week's
bombing "now has freed us from
any bounds or restrictions" in
supporting the North Vietnamese
Communist regime. Although the
declaration contained an implied
threat to increase aid to Hanoi,
it made no specific commitments.

Disagree at
Conference
Communist China
Seen as Pragmatic
By Japanese Head
KYOTO, Japan (P)--Japan and
the United States disagreed yes-
terday over Communist China at
the opening of the fifth annual
meeting of Japanese and U.S.
Cabinet officers.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
said Communist China was "con-
tinuing its hostility and intransi-
gence toward the United States
and the rest of the world."
But Foreign Minister Etusasa-
buro Shiina said that despite its
hostile attacks on the Japanese
government, Communist China
seemed pragmatic in its actions
toward Japan. He declared Japan
would continue to make contacts
with Red China to help it break
out of world isolation.
About 2000 Communists, social-
ists and extremist university stu-
dents snake-danced through the
streets of Kyoto, the ancient for-
mer capital of Japan, clashed with
police and shouted insults at the
American policy-makers.
They failed to muster the mass-
ed thousands they had predicted
would pour out to underscore Jap-
anese opposition to American
bombing of North Viet Nam, par-
ticularly the suburbs of Hanoi
and Haiphong.
Important Ally
America's biggest and most im-
portant ally in Asia, Japan has ex-
tended little more than lukewarm
moral support to the U.S. war ef-
fort.
The United States continues to
court the Japanese to maintain a
stand of aloof friendliness.
The reason for this is that Ja-
pan, hemmed in by a no-war con-
stitution of America's own devis-
ing, is prohibited from sending
military men overseas. The Japa-
nese want no involvement in a
quarrel they regard as alien to
them.
Prime Minister Eisaku Sato is
under heavy pressure from the op-
position and even from some mem-
bers of his own party to adopt a
more independent stand to exact
some concessions from the United
States on other questions, such as
that of Communist China, in ex-
change for his steadfastness.
"dNE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
-N. Y. Post -. Y. Daily News
1!Ao

JOHNSON CITY, Tex. () -
President Johnson took an opti-
mistic view yesterday of the war
in Viet Nam, quoting "diplomatic
reports" as indicating the Com-
munists "no longer expect a mili-
tary victory."
Meanwhile in Saigon, another
air-sea fight marked the Ameri-
can campaign against North Viet
Nam yesterday. For the second
time in five days U.S. Navy
planes exchanged fire with Com-
munist torpedo boats. One plane
was shot down. It was undeter-
mined whether the boats were
hit.
On the political front Premier
Nguyen Cao Ky's military govern-
ment formally installed an.80-
member army and people's ad-
visory council, a generally repre-
sentative body including a num-
ber of skilled technicians.
The formation of the council
strengthened the plan for a pro-
gressive one-year transition of
power to an elected civilian gov-
ernment.
The council will assist the rul-
ing director and cabinet in poli-
tical, economic and social matters
at a particularly crucial time.
Magazine Report
And from a Paris weekly maga-
zine, Enterprise, came a report
that before the bombing of Ha-
naoi and Haiphong, President Ho
Chi Minh of North Viet Nam
Warned Communist China and the
Soviet Union that, "If there is no
new development, we will have to,
come to terms with the United
States toward the middle of 1967."
The magazine cited no author-
ity for its information.
At the same time Communist
China's foreign minister, Chen Yi,
declared in a statement broadcast
from Peking that his government
will support North Viet Nam at
all costs and "will not hesitate
to risk any danger to annihilate

University of Michigan
SAILING. CLUB
Regular Meetings Every Thursday,
7:45 P.M. in 231 Angell Hall.
SAILING and RACING every weekend
in 10 fiberglass Skipjaeks.
Come this THURSDAY, JULY 7, if you
want to find out about the club.

U.S. OPTIMISTIC:
Air-Sea Fight Goes on While
Ky Installs Advisory Council

U.S. aggression and win final vic-
tory."
A State Department spokesman
said yesterday he had no informa-
tion on the Paris report.
Press Officer Marshall Wright"
said the U.S. position of willing-
ness to discuss a peaceful settle-
ment is well known and has been
repeated at every official level
from President Johnson on down.
The President underscored dur-
ing his televised news conference
yesterday that never before in
U.S. history has there been "such
a rapid and effective expansion"
of this country's military might
without recourse to such measures
as mobilizing Reserves or clamp-
ing mandatory controls on the
economy.

No military force has been so
well supplied, Johnson went on,
and the U.S. forces always have
been able to bring their power to
bear without shortages.
Johnson said no required air
sorties have been canceled and
said air support being given the
troops is unprecedented.
U.S. Air Force and Navy squad-
rons, which flew 91 multi-plane
missions Monday, kept up their
blows north of the border yester-
day. Two fuel storage areas-19
miles southeast of Haiphong and
25 miles west of Thanh Hoa -
were singled out in Fourth of July
raids pursuing the drive to cut off
oil for North Viet Nam's war ma-
chine.

W.orld News Roundup
By The Associated Press Europe," was signed by all the
LANSING - Michigan's two- delegations representing the Soviet
year-old legislative apportionment Union, Romania, Czechoslovakia,
fight has been laid before the U.S. East Germany, Poland, Bulgaria
Supreme Court, State Solicitor asGemnPldBgri
General Robert, Derengoskisaid and Hungary, the Romanian news
yesterday. agency Agerpress announced. It
William T. Gossett, attorney for gave no details.
the 34 persons who have challeng- Official spokesmen denied knowl-
ed Michigan's one-man-one vote edge of the declaration, believed
legislative districting, said the to have been worked out by the
claim of appeal was filed in Wash- pact's foreign ministers in Mos-
ington last Friday. cow last month.
* *s

W

BUCHAREST, Romania - After
what appeared to be a clash be-
tween Romania and the Soviet
Union over military issues, the
Warsaw Pact powers found some-
thing to agree on yesterday-Eu-
ropean security.
i A "declaration on the strength-
ening of peace and security in

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.~~WV.WA....tfl. . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The military meeting is expected
to end today, probably with a
strong statement on Viet Nam but
with little else being made public.
*, * *
LONDON-The House of Com-
mons allowed by a huge majority
yesterday the introduction of a
bill to legalize homosexuality be-
tween consenting made adults in
private. The size of the vote, 244-
100, appeared to assure passage.
The bill does not cover women,
since lesbianism never has been il-
legal in modern Britain.
LOS ANGELES-The National
Governors Conference opened yes-
terday with Gov. George W. Rom-
ney of Michigan sparking a bit of
fussing and Democrats bidding
for an endorsement of the way
President Johnson runs the Viet-
namese war.
Outside the conference hotel,
pickets paraded peacefully but
noisily for or against peace in Viet
Nam. At one point about 100 were
yelling for it, 20 against. And a
quartet of policemen was keeping
an eye on all of them.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 6
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"True Story of an Election":
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Li-
brary, 1:30 p.m.
Dept. of English Lecture -- James B.
Sledd, University of Texas, "Lost inI
Space, or Gunsmoke from the New
Grammars": Aud. C, Angell Hall, 4:10
p.m.
University Musical Society Summer
Series Concert-Alfred Brendel, plan-
ist: Rackham Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Forum
-"The Management and Supervisory
Training Clinic": Room 146, Graduate
School of Business Administration, 8:30
a.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Richard
DIAL 662-6264
ENDING TONIGHT

Duncan Elder, Education and Psy-
chology; thesis, "A Comparison of the
Oral Reading of Groups of Scottish
and American Children," Thurs., July 7.
Room 4018 UHS, at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
man, I. H. Anderson.
Law school Admission Test: Appli-
cation blanks for the Law School Ad-
mission Test are available in 122 Rack-
ham Bldg. The next administration of
the test will be on Sat., Aug. 6 and
applications must be received in
Princeton, N.J., by July 23.
Admission Test for Graduate Study
in Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
mission Test for Graduate Study in
Business on Sat., July 9, are requested
to report to Room 140, Business Ad-
ministration Bldg. at 8:45 a.m. Satur-
day.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign vsi-
tars programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center. 764-2148.
Niels Haagerup, Paris defense corres-
pondent for the leading Danish news-
poper, Berlingske Tidende, Denmark,
July 5-6.
Benjamin Kwakwa, lecturer in Eng-
lish, University of Ghana, Legon, Gha-
na, July 5-7.

Helena Kwakwa, teacher, secondary
school, Accra, Ghana, July 5-7.
Boon Peng Sim, director, Singapore
Peaple's Association, Singapore, July 10-
17.
Mrs. Boon Peng Sim (Quek Sok
Chang), English teacher in pre-univer-
sity classes, Nan Chian Girls' High
School, Singapore, July 10-17.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
s * s
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Book
review and discussion of "The Mis-
sion" by Hans Habe, John Willertz,
Dept. of History, Thurs., July 7, 8 p.m.,
1429 Hill.
University Lutheran Chapel, Book
review: "Foreign Policy in Christian
Perspective" by John C. Bennett, re-
viewed by Steve Smallwood, Wed., July
6, 9 p.m. Midweek service, Rev. Scheldt:
"Christian Goals in Church Organiza-
tion," 10 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw.

The IibfTeiS
in Song and Coo'
ENDS TONIGHT
Thursday-
"HIGH INFIDELITY"

Phone 482-2056
6%nants OcmCARPENTER ROAD

The Area's Newest Drive-in is
easy to reach--2 miles South of
Washtenow Rd. on Carpenter Rd.
OPEN 7 P.M.

FIRST RUN-NOW SHOWING-ALL COLOR
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HILLEL presents
John Willertz
Dept. of History
BOOK REVIEW and DISCUSSION of
THE MISSION
by Hans Habe

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Showni at 10:40 Only :
PLUS-"EE-WEE LEAGUERS"-IN COL
2 COLOR CARTOONS

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"PARADISE
HAWAIIAN STYLE"

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THURSDAY, July 7
8 P.M.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill St.

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"PROMSE
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"THE FUNNIEST
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, -Saturday Review

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
(department of speech) present
ENRICO IV
by LUIGI
PIRANDELLO
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