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June 28, 1966 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-28

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FEIFFER

Seventy-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

4

ere Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MIcH.
Truth Will Prevail"a

NEws PHONE: 764-0552

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1

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the inidividual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

ESDAY, JUNE 28, 1966

NIGHT EDITOR: MEREDITH EIKER

Detroit Is Facing
The Ultimate Traffic Jam

J

DETROIT--On the near east side of the
city, a number of once-splendid brown-
stones and row houses stand on still
pleasant tree lined streets. The houses
and the trees are doomed, for they stand
in the path of yet another freeway to be
built through this already car-choked
city.
Detroit is beginning to pay dearly for
being the motor city. Despite attempts at
diversification, this is still a one-industry
town. Chrysler dominates the east side
while Ford virtually owns the southwest-
ern suburb of Dearborn. General Motors
is conspicuous by its general offices in the
heart of town-the fourth largest office
building in the world--and its numerous
factories. Other major industries such as
Kelsey-Hayes and Budd wheel are totally
dependent on the automobile industry.-
IN THE SIXTH decade of Our Ford, De-
troit's total preoccupation with the car
is more prominent than ever. Three major
freeways are named Ford, Chrysler and
Fisher. The city's newest high school is
named for the man who put women be-
hind the wheel, Charles Kettering, inven-
tor of the electric starter. This automobile
hang-up, together with the overt and co-
vert opposition of the industry to any-
thing which would weaken its position
has prevented the city from seeking any
sort of imaginative solution to its massive
transportation problem.
While the traffic situation has not yet
become as critical as Manhattan's, it is
still possible to average thirty miles per
hour that even in rush hours, the powers-
that-be in the community seem deter-
mined to do nothing until the Ultimate
Traffic Jam finally develops.
The Ultimate Traffic Jam-that state
in which the streets become so saturated
with motor vehicles that all traffic finally
grinds to its ultimate, final bumper-to-
bumper dead stop-lies in the future of
all major metropolitan centers unless a
good deal of time and money are spent on
seeking imaginative solutions to the
problem of getting several million people
from their homes to their jobs every day.
THE SAN FRANCISCO Bay area is the
first major urban center to actually
make an attempt at finding a better way.

Work is beginning on the first integrated
megalopolitan rapid-transit system.
Unfortunately for Detroit, the mere
thought of rapid transit ranks with Com-
munism and highway safety as something
to be fought on the beaches, in the streets
and doorways. Apparently, they will never
surrender. Every plan for effective public
transportation has been stymied by the
vocal and powerful opposition of the auto
industry and its friends.
Public transportation in the nation's
fifth largest city is an extremely unfunny
joke. It consists entirely :of a large fleet
of very slow, air-poluting, smelly buses.
The system is so bad that it is used
generally only as an absolute last resort.
The control of the auto companies is so
strong that when the Detroit Street Rail-
ways, operator of the system, recently
bought several buses from an Ohio com-
pany rather than General Motors, which
had previously been the sole contractor,
the public outcry was loud and persistant.
'THUS FAR, Detroit's only answer to this
overwhelming problem has been to
build ever more expressways, destroying
more old brownstones, cutting into the
property tax base, dislocating thousands
of residents and ultimately only creating
new traffic jams.
Detroit simply refuses to face the in-
creasingly evident fact that the personal
automobile has become economically and
socially a totally obsolete mode of urban
transportation. The average commuting
car carries only its driver. The most ef-
ficient six-lane freeway can only handle
50,000 autos per hour at best. Once down-
town, the car must be stored and each
vehicle occupies at least 100 square feet
of floor space. The mere statistics can
eventually lead only to the Ultimate
Traffic Jam.
DETR'OIT AND the auto makers must
come to the realization that while the
car is an outstanding vehicle for high
speed, cross-country transportation, its
day in the city is over. The car manufac-
turers should reconsider their position on
rapid transport before Henry Ford one
day finds himself caught in the midst of
the Ultimate Traffic Jam.
-STEVE WILDSTROM

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Europe: Change in the Order of Things

4
j

GEN. CHARLES de Gaulle's visit
to Moscow is by no means the
only sign of change in the order of
things to which we have become
accustomed during the postwar
era.
There is evidence of a thaw
in both parts of Germany. There
is first of all the remarkable
agreement to hold open televised
debates between the German So-
cial Democratic Party and the
East German Communist-Socialist
Fusion Party. Though the Soviet
government may yet prohibit the
debate, this would only confirm
and emphasize the fact that there
is a strong and potent feeling in
both Germanys in favor of talks
and positive collaboration.
THE SIGNIFICANCE of this
break with the old immobilized
official German tradition was
proved spectacularly the other day
when the majority leader in the
German Parliament, Christian
Democrat Dr. Rainer Barzel, pro-
posed terms of a settlement with

the Soviet Union which have never
been dreamed of before and are,
to say the least, offbeat.
There are signs also of a thaw
in -United States policy, not only
in the President's wise refusal to
get into an altercation with Gen.
De Gaulle, but significantly in
Secretary of Defense Robert Mc-
Namara's statement to the Jack-
son subcommittee that if the So-
viet Union reduces its troops in
Eastern Europe the United States
would act correspondingly.
This comes after McGeorge
Bundy's brilliant testimony before
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee in which he advised
the West Germans to accept the
Oder-Neisse frontier and to re-
nounce the business of nuclear
weapons.
IT IS NOW clear that Gen. De
Gaulle's objective has been to put
an end to the cold war between
the Western coalition, which in-
cludes the United States, and the
Eastern coalition, which includes

Today
and
Tomorrow
By WALTER LIPPMANN
the Soviet Union. His objective
will be achieved fully when and
if the two Germanys and the two
Europes are brought together.
As this process develops there
will be solved as a matter of
course the theoretical disputes of
how much and how little influence
the United States is to exercise
in the new Europe. For in an in-
creasingly reconciled Europe such
issues as the integration of mili-
tary command and nuclear shar-
ing will no longer matter and will
cease to be interesting.
A militarily reconciled Europe
will, one may imagine, be chiefly
concerned with the problems of
the coexistence, the reciprocal ad-

justments and the collaboration
of the many different kinds of
economy which now exist between,
the Atlantic and the Urals. For
there is no longer any such thing
as an old-fashioned capitalist
economy or a Stalinist Communist
economy. They are all mixed econ-
omies in varying degrees.
GEN DE GAULLE has released
and encouraged this European
process, and there is no doubt that
it carries with it strong anti-
American overtones. These are due
in the main to two things.
One is that, thanks to the State
Department, we missed the bus
in Europe and are associated in
the minds of so many Europeans
with the prolongation of the cold
war which they hope to end.
Another source of European
anti-Americanism is the fact that
without consulting them, without
asking the judgment of the United
Nations, of NATO, of SEATO or
of any other international body,
President Johnson is waging a war

in Asia which could become a
world war. From the European
point of view, to be an ally of
the Johnson administration with
its inveterate unilateralism is to
be in a dangerously entangling
alliance.
WHEN GEN. DE GAULLE tells
the Europeans that they cannot
count on the United States in
Europe because America's main
interests are now in Asia and else-
where, he does not mean that
Europeans can deal with, their own
affairs and give the United States
a free hand in all other continents.
There is much more to it than
that. Along with the changes
which in Europe are making ob-
solete the military confrontation
with the Soviet Union, there are
changes in the rest of the world
which are altering radically the
role of military power in the midst
of social turbulence. We are only
beginning to think about this, and
we -shall have to talk about it
much more in the future.
(c), 1966, The Washington Poet Co.

.

Urban Renewal: *Saving Old Neirghborhoods

Registration: Long
Lines and Bad Counseling

T'S SUMMER TIME, and as the Summer
Session (known to the initiate as IIIB)
begins, one finds orientation groups of
freshmen-to-be staggering around cam-
pus in the heat, looking very uncomfort-
able and a little awed, while sadder-but
wiser upperclassmen grit their teeth for
another round of registration.
It seems as though University's schools;
might take advantage of the smaller en-
rollment during the third term to try
to make registration more bearable for
students. But apparently they're determ-
ined to see us standing in line, hot wea-
ther notwithstanding.
IN THE LITERARY college, although
"registrationaires" and "class cards"
were available in advance, students could
not get the needed approval from a coun-
selor until yesterday. This means that
the counselors can give only a few min-
utes to each student, and that many stu-
dents are being forced to wait, whether
or not they really need counseling.
But waiting in line is nothing com-
pared to what faces the student when he

finally reaches a counselor. How many of
our counselors really understand the
scores of the QAIS or "raw carrots" test?
(Many of us can remember the day when
we were told, in the manner of a death
sentence, "Your motivation is below
average.")
How many departmental counselors
are well-informed about courses in other
departments which might help a student
with a particular field of interest? How
many freshman and sophomore counsel-
ors try to talk students into taking
courses in their departments, whether or
not the students are interested?
EVERY SEMESTER everyone agrees
that the University counseling ser-
vices could be much improved. The sum-
mer would be a good time to start. Maybe
next year ...
CAROLE KAPLAN
The Budget
C 0 *
Ceiling Debate
PRESIDENT JOHNSON and the Con-
gress are once again wasting valuable
legislative time in farcical debate over
how much to raise the National Debt
ceiling.
What difference if the figure is set at
$300 billion, $330 billion, or $500 billion
-the amount has as much meaning as
a campaign promise if it can be raised at
will whenever expenditures exceed the
limit.
The necessity to continually develop
verbose and believable excuses for having

By NEAL BRUSS
WHEN CURRENT social work-
ers and their patients are
dead, the buildings raised for ur-
ban renewal will be the prime-
concrete, perhaps-testimony to a
war on poverty that was begun
even before the Great Society.
The housing projects, the con-
sequences of slum clearance, are
black comic testimony to the sad
absurdity of the American up-
heaval.
THEY ARE the deteriorating
high-rise buildings placed futur-
istically on flat weedy malls. They
are the ranch-style housing wedg-
ed tight on the dark and narrow
sidestreets, the ones where shiny
late model cars are parked bumper
to bumper on both sides of the
street.
Both kinds are honeycombed
with miserably cramped apart-
ments outfitted with shining new
electric appliances and fixtures.
Sometimes the occupants shrug
their shoulders over whether the
new place was better than the
old, the house with the leaky pipes
and crumbling stairs. And the
rats.
THE HOUSING PROJECTS sit
on land once covered by real
neighborhoods. But the buildings
were old and filthy. There was
crime and violence. The neighbor-
hood was titled a slum, and per-
haps slowly the neighbors were
relocated.
The buildings were smashed.
Motorists from the outside would
drive by and gape at the ruins
recently created by the destruc-
tion tools, and they would pride
themselves on a city that was
helping its poor by destroying
dangerous old homes.
Then the big pieces would be
carted away, and the little pieces
would go into the basement fill,
Some noble signs would title the
parcel of land, explain that the
land could be bought by industry,
or that it had been set aside for
an international village or some
luxury apartments. Or a housing
project.
But there would be a hole in the
skyline. Square blocks, a neigh-
borhood would be missing.
Then the new, monolithic struc-
tures would be placed on the
empty lots-new housing, perhaps
without leaky pipes for a while.

slum for demolition. The residents
protest; but because of the classi-
fication, owners are discouraged
from making improvements, banks
will not finance renovations, ex-
cellent but timid residents move
away. So by the time the protest
drags through the hostile adminis-
trative procedure, the neighbor-
hood is certifiable as a slum and
is demolished. The example is
grim because there is, at the same
time, a critical shortage of hous-
ing, and a functioning neighbor-
hood has been disrupted."

GOODMAN, who believes
borhoods should be given'
rule," presents a rather
example.

neigh-
"home
tame

half the cost of building new pub-
lic housing.
"Neighbors are talking about
bricking in and planting the once
junk-filled courtyard at the back;
the city will close off an entire
block for a park, and U.S. Gypsum
has promised playground equip-
ment, treets, and lights ."
Perhaps it is too early to give
sweeping praise to all involved in
the Harlem experiment. Perhaps
as U.S. Gypsum tackles other
apartments, results will be less
shining.
HOWEVER, this alternative to
knock - em - down-and-toss-em-up
urban renewal has accomplished
several laudable aims.
It has provided decent and dur-
able "new" housing,
It has been economical.
It has not necessitated reloca-
tion of neighbors. There are no
refugees to outlying neighbor-
hoods.

It has, rather, returned tennants
to stunning old homes.
It has retained the character of
an old significant spot on the city
map.
It has uplifted morale and ban-
ished commonplace crime.
It has stimulatedresidents to
improve their neighborhood.
And it will probably inspire en-
thusiasm among residents of other
shabby neighborhoods.
The U.S. Gypsum project and
the Goodman example provide evi-
dence, at least, that slum clear-
ance is no panacea.
TO% WRECK a neighborhood
does remove a pitiable problem
demanding attention. In many
cases, the old neighborhood may
be beyond repair-or perhaps
painfully out.of-keeping with a
sound urban design. Then wreck-
ing and rebuilding may be defend-
able.
But the men who order the bull-

Proponents of slum clearance
would say that the real slums must
be cleared, that Goodman's neigh-
borhood is far from home, that
nothing like that happens in their
town.
But even in possibly The Worst
Neighborhood In The United
States, slum clearance has been
challenged, and urban renewal
may be discounted.
It is in Harlem, according to
United Press International writ-
er Maggie Bellows, that slum re-
habilitation has proven itself, and
the U.S. Gypsum Company has
done some pleasing efficient work.
U.S. GYPSUM, Miss Bellows re-
ported, "found a row of six time-
wracked brick buildings in the
notorious section of East Harlem,
on 102nd Street. They were dingy
and peeling; the hallways stank of
urine and winos; the streets were
littered with 'Harlemairmail'
(garbage tossed out' of the win-
dows at night).
"The apartments had no closets;
no showers (Just tubs in the kit-
chens). Plumbing hung precar-
iously to the gaping walls; win-
dows rattled at the rims; patched
against the cold with old rags or
cardboard," Miss Bellows' article,
published Sunday in the Detroit
Free Press, accounted.
"The company found empty
apartments on the block for tem-
porary housing, made repairs,
moved the families out of No. 307,
and went to work with sledge
hammers, stripping it to its orig-
inal brick, tearing down parti-
tions and ripping out old plumbing
and wiring.
"Special materials developed for
rehabilitation work were used.

LETTERS:

A Refusal To Send

dozers into action must be very
careful that they are not acting
out of bitter revulsion at some-
thing that mocks, terrifies, and
shames them. They must also be
wary of a trend of demolition that
destroys their City itself.
The odd, quickly-depreciating
new buildings are 'alien to new
tennants, who may not know how
to operate their new appliances.
The new housing has been expen-
sive to build and certainly not
durable.
EVEN FRAGMENTARY results
of urban revitalization projects of
saving and refitting, and the fail-
ures of the new housing of the
poor point that the new housing
approach may be only a short-
sighted expedient to a reworkable
problem. But whether newly-
constructed or salvaged, the hous-
ing left after the war on poverty
will mark the urban landscape
long after the poor and the pov-
erty administrators.
!Grades
like "blind idealists" and, although
I may have been deluded in col-
lege by "marching moralists" and
their "new hurrah," I am in
graduate school and have learned
the necessity for perseverance to
the task at hand and will bring
that dedication to whatever serv-
ice you people think can benefit
our country and its great society.
I AM AFRAID I have forgotten
my questionnaire but I'm not sure
why you need it since you already
have a file for me with the num-
ber 51 20 44 50 with your local
branch number 85 here in Ann
Arbor. If you have any further
questions, please do not hesitate to
send me another form.
-Mike Karreich
Union Pool
To the editor:
AS AN ALUMNUS of the Uni-
versity, a life member of the
Union, and a present graduate
student, I want to indicate my op-
position to the present plan to
close the Union swimming pool to
make room for Alumni Associa-

*.

-

EDITOR'S NOTE - This is a
copy of a letter sent by Ruven
Brooks to The University Regis-
trar, Vice-President for Aca-
demic Affairs Allan F. Smith,
and to Local Board No. 85, Ann
Arbor.)
Dr. Edward G. Groesbeck,
Registrar
1550 Administration Building
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Dear Sir :
By SENDING out class ranks
without specific, positive con-
sent on the part of its students
and by its willingness to com-
pute these ranks on a males-only
basis, the University of Michcigan
has shown support for a Selective
Service policy which is arbitrary,
immoral, and inherently unjust.
I am, therefore, unwilling to
have any part of my academic
record, class standing or anything
else, sent to my draft board un-
less the board makes a specific re-
quest to me to review my entire
academic record to see if, indeed,
I am a "student in good stand-
ing, making normal progress to-
wards a recognized degree."

berlane, Peace Corps Selection
Service, as encouragement to
other not-so-outstanding stu-
dents to serve with her organ-
ization.
Dear Miss Chamberlane:
I AM COMPLETING the form
you sent me. Although I realize
how immense your task must be
and how impossible it is for you
to maintain a personal corre-
spondence with all your applicants
I hope you won't consider me
forward for writing to you. Your
form is so exact and I'm afraid
my answers may not have satis-
fied them. I hope this letter may
clarify them.
IT IS DIFFICULT (as you can
perhaps imagine) to find six per-
sons who can corroborate my ac-
count of the year since my appli-
cation. I had thought of suggest-
ing the registrar would could ver-
ify my enrollment at the Univer-
sity of Michigan but the tran-
script I have sent will (I hope)
servejust as officially since it
carries the University's seal. That

CI4r Atd jigazn Daily
Editorial Staff
LEONARD PRATT ................. ..Co-Editor
OHARLOTTE, WOLTER .................... Co-Editor
HUD WIL$YNSON ...................... Sports Editor
BETSY COHN .................. Supplement Manager
NIGHT EDITORS: Meredith Eicter, Michael Heffer,
Shirley Bosick, Susan Schnepp, Martha Wolfgang.
Business Staff

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