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June 22, 1966 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-22

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22,1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE t

WEDNESDAY JUNE 22, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TURE~

*REVOLT COLLAPSING:

Ky Arrests Buddhist
During Hunger Strike

Discusses Reducing
Forces in Europe

i

TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS:
Senate Committee Approves
Strict Auto Safety Proposal

SAIGON ()-Premier Nguyen
4 Cao Ky capped his operations
against Buddhist dissidents by ar-
resting one of their militant lead-
ers, Tri Quang, on the 14th day
of his hunger strike yesterday.
Quang was flown from a hos-
pital in Hue to a hospital in Sai-
gon, while Ky cautiously renewed
f' peace talks with other Buddhist
leaders.
Collapse of the power play by
the chiefs of a Buddhist minority
against the military gdvernment
and its American support could
free regiments of South Vietna-
mese troops from turmoil in Sai-
gon and Hue for renewed field
duty.
Against this background, 2000
or more Americans of the 101st
Airborne and 1st Cavalry, Airmo-
bile, Divisions smashed at heav-
ily fortified positions of the Red
battalion in Phu Yen Province
north of Tuy Hoa, a coastal base
240 miles northeast of Saigon.
Tunnels, Logs
The Communists fought from
tunnels and log bunkers to keep
a toehold on the eastern flank of
the highland area. This is an area
they have long wished to control
and thus cut South Viet Nam in
two. Two major battles earlier
this month were around Pleiku
and Kontum, on the western flank.
The Communist force has lost
69 known dead and probably
many more. However, headquar-
ters has not yet said whether the
unit was a hard-core guerrilla
outfit or a North Vietnamese reg-
ular battalion.
Much previous fighting in the
highlands has been against North
Vietnamese regulars who infiltrat-

nists went to their previously for-
tified hideout,
The virtual collapse of the Bud-
dhist revolt was emphasized by
the arrest of Quang and the mili-
tant leader of the Buddhist youth
movement, Bun Ton. The monk's
departure under guard caused lit-
tle evident concern in Hue, a
Buddhist stronghold now in the
hands of government troops and
police. About 20 monks and nuns
held a small demonstration, ask-
ing for his return.

Quang was spurning solid food
in a fast he said would be main-
tained until President Johnson
canceled American support of the
government and the ruling gen-
erals resigned.
Troops and police kept several
hundred other Buddhists penned
up for the fourth day within the
institute compound, despite their
plea to the International Red
Cross that they were menaced by
disease and starvation.

Cherry Bombs Great
Kin g in Mississippi

WASHINGTON (P) - Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
said yesterday the United States
would reduce its armed man-
power in Europe if the Soviet
Union cut its forces in the Com
munist East.
But McNamara would not say
whether the United States has
discussed this possibility with Mos-
sow. He said that is a matter of
diplomacy, not defense.
And he told senators investigat-
ing the problems that beset the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion:
"It would be unwise for our na-
tion today to reduce its combat
capability in Europe:"
Curtailment
He said a curtailment of U.S.
combat capability there would be
prudent only if the Communists
made reciprocal concessions, poli-
tical or military.
McNamara said he draws a dis-
tinction between combat capabil-
ity and manpower or expendi-
tures. He said there are legiti-
mate pressures now for reduc-
tion in the level of U.S. forces in
Europe.
"They must be seriously consid-.
ered," he said. "However, it should
be clearly understood that the U.S.
has no plans to diminish its com-
bat capability in Europe."
McNamara said that by Decem-
ber, the U.S. will again have 225,-
000 men in Europe, a level which
he said had dipped by about 15,-
000 because of "minor fluctua-
tions of normal replacement and
turnover rates."
Capability
"Let me say simply and cate-

gorically that the U.S. is capable
of maintaining its combat capabil-
ity in Europe while continuing to
meet planned troop deployments
to Southeast Asia."
While McNamara testified be-
fore the Senate Government Oper-
ations subcommittee on national
security, former Secretary of the
Treasury Douglas Dillon discuss-
ed NATO problems with the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Committee.
Both Dillon and McNamara said
French withdrawal from the mili-
tary structure of NATO will be
inconvenient, perhaps expensive,
but not crippling to the alliance.
"It appears reasonable to be-
lieve that France still intends to
oppose a Soviet attack should such
aggression take place," said Dil-
lon, once U.S. ambassador to Paris.
"It would be undignified and
would serve no useful purpose for
us to argue or quibble with France
about her basic decision," Dillon
said. "Nothing can be accomplish-
ed by showing resentment. Noth-
ing is to be gained by name-call-
ing."
Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark)
said it seems possible that the
Moscow visit of French President
Charles de Gaulle might open new
avenues of discussion with the So-
viet Union.
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy (D-
NY), questioning McNamara at a
session which drew a standing-
room crowd, said he would like to
see the U.S. take a leading role in
seeking possible avenues to a Eu-
ropean settlement.

WASHINGTON (P)---A "much
tougher" auto safety bill than
President Johnson sought or auto
makers proposed-requiring man-
datory federal standards - was
approved unanimously yesterday
by the Senate Commerce Commit-
tee.
The description of the measure
was given by Committee Chairman
Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash),
who said "we think" the bill,
fashiond in weeks of hearings,
will reduce deaths and injuries
in auto accidents, if it becomes
law.
The committee authorized spend-
ing $51 million over the next three
years to set up the standards. The
administration had asked $18 mil-
lion but Magnuson said the com-
mittee's plan is so much more
comprehensive that considerably
more money would be needed.
Interim Standards
The measure directs the secre-
tary of commerce to set interim
federal standards by next Jan.
31, with the expectation that these
would apply to 1968 model cars.
A year later, on Jan. 31, 1968,
the secretary would be required to
lay down the first permanent safe-
ty standards. These would be re-
vised and kept up to date every
two years after that.
The mandatory standards would
apply to American and foreign
cars, trucks, buses and motor
scooters sold in this country,
The committee rejected an in-

dustry suggestion that a cost fac-
tor be included in deciding on
standards.
The committee also rejected,
over Magnuson's objection, setting
criminal penalties for manufactur-
ers who violate the bill's provi-
sions. But included are fines of
up to $400,000 for a related se-
ries of violations.
The government would also have
a right to get injunctions to pre-
vent any violation of the stand-
ards.
But the committee inserted lan-
guage to allay industry fears of
antitrust prosecution of the auto
makers work together to develop
safety devices.

The secretary would be required
to consult with state officials and
the industry before establishing
standards.
And the secretary would be au-
thorized to undertake extensive
testing and research to guide him
in framing standards and to set
up a special traffic accident re-
search center,
Magnuson said the interim
standards the committee hopes
will be required for 1968 models
will be based on such things as
seat belts, padded dashboards, im-
pact-absorbing steering columns,
exhaust control devices and back-
up lights. .

I r

a

HILLEL GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL
presents
A TALK. and DISCUSSION

PHILADELPHIA, Miss. (R) - A
throng of hostile, jeering whites
threw cherry bombs and shouted
threats yesterday as Martin Luth-
er King told a crowd of Negroes
at the Neshoba County Courthouse
of "men with hatred on their
faces, who want to turn this
country backwards."
The Negroes were stoned as they
marched to the downtown area
from a church a mile away. One
man was clubbed. Two camera-
men were manhandled and their
equipment smashed. White youths
wielding ax handles and hoes
grabbed Negroes in the line of
march and started fights that were
broken up by police.
"I'm not afraid of any man,"
King shouted as the heckling and
disorder mounted. "Before I will
be a slave, I will be dead in my
grave."

King flew to Philadelphia to
lead an anniversary memorial
service for three civil rights work-
ers who were slain near here two
years ago. He was joined by a de-
tachment from the Mississippi
march, which reached Yazoo City
yesterday, and local Negroes+
Numbering about 100, the group
walked from the Mt. Nemo Bap-
tist Church to the Neshoba Coun-
ty jail to the courthouse.
The man who initiated the
Mississippi march, James H. Mer-
edith, said in New York he would
join the trek tomorrow or Fri-
day, and continue into Jackson.

"'WHY JEWS ARE DIFFERENT"
Martin Gold, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Sunday, June 26,
2 P.M.

Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street

ed down the Ho Chi Minh trail "We'll help you," roared several
and across the Laotian border. whites in the crowd, Others laugh-
Like the earlier battles in the ed.
west, the latest was precipitated by King, head of the Southern
an American thrust into Commu- Christian Leadership Conference,
nist-infested territory. Monday. didn't flinch when a cherry bomb
the Red Force attempted to sur- exploded loudly at his feet. He
prise a small unit of the 101st said afterward he considered Phil-
Airborne pushing through an open adelphia "by far the toughest
valley as part of the newly town we have been in. There is
launched Operation Nathan Hale. a complete breakdown of law
As soon as the battle was join- and order." He told newsmen he
ed, the 101st troopers were rein- would ask for federal protection
forced by units from the cavalry. in the town, because he intended
Vastly outnumbered, the Commu- to return.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

National Roundup
By The Associated Press across-the-board increase" in fed-
WASHINGTON-A big drop in eral taxes.
food prices last month gave Dillon, a Republican who served
Americans a temporary breather in the cabinets of Presidents Ken-
in the highest spiral of living costs nedy and Johnson, told the Sen-
in 15 years, the government said ate Foreign Relations Committee
yesterday. that budget cutting and tightened
Grocery prices declined six- monetary policy are not sufficient
tenths of one per cent and bal- to meet the problems of inflation.

anced off increases in other liv-
ing costs to a relatively slight
over-all rise.
The net effect on the Labor
Department's Consumer Price In-
dex measuring typical family liv-
ing costs was a one-tenth of one
per cent hike to 112.6. This means
it cost $11.26 in May to buy goods

WASHINGTON - The Senate
Ethics Committee concluded two
days of closed hearings yesterday
on its investigation on misconduct
charges against Sen. Thomas J.
Dodd (D-Conn), and will start
public hearings today.
Chairman John Stennis (D-

The. Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
tore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Day Calendar
Insitute on College and University
Administration - Rackham Assembly
Hall, 9 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-"Management of
Behavior Change": Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m.
Events .Friday
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., June
24, 4 p.m., Room 807 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg. Barrp M. Lasker, Mt. Wilson and
Palomar Observatories, yill speak on
"The Dynamics of H II Regions."
DT Astronomy Dept. Visitors' Night: Fri. ,
June 24, 9 p.m., Aud. D, Angell Hall.
Darrell J. MacConnell will speak on
"Cluster of Stars." After the lecture
the Student Observatory on the fifth
floor of Angell Hall will be open for
inspection and for telescopic observa-
tions of the Globular Cluster M13 in
Hercules and the Moon. Children wel-
corned, but must be accompanied by
adults.
General Notices
Grades-Spring 1966-IIIA: Instruc-
tor lists have been sent to depart-
ments for submission of Spring grade
repprts. It is anticipated that all grade
reports will be submitted to the De-
partmental Offices or the Registrar',
Office within 72 hours of the finalIi
examination. The Registrar's Of fice
will provide grade pickup on the cen-
tral campus on June 23. 24 and 27-29.
Grades may also be submitted directly
to the office during regular office
hours at Window A, Administration
Bldg. Questions pertaining to grade re--
ports may be directed to 764-6292.
Walking Tours: Free walking tours
of the University's Central Campus will
be offered beginning Mon., June 27,
at 11 a.m. Tours will depart Monday
through Friday from the information
desk of the Administration Bldg.
Doctoral Candidates who expect to
receive degrees in August 1966 should
have turned in two bound and one
unbound copies of their dissertations
to the office of the Graduate School.
The report of the doctoral committee
or, the final oral examination must be
filed with the Recorder of the Gradu-
ate School together with two copies
of the thesis, ready in all respects for
publication, not later than Mon., July
18.
Parking Notice: Effective June 22, the
restrictions on Parking Lot W-26, 400
d hinek of Thompson St.. will be chana-

anrd south bays'5ill b]e open meter
pr<king, no permit required.
Doctoral Examination for Salvatore
Vincrent DiFranco, thesis: "A Study
of Grad(uates of Sixth-Year Programs
in School Administration," Thurs., June
23, Room 3206 UHS. at 1 p.m. Co-
Chairmen, L. W. Anderson and H. S.
Bretsch.
Doctoral Examination for Bernard
Arnold Green, Psychology; thesis: "Con-
cern about Emotional Alienation: A
Motive for Conformity," Thurs., June
23, Staff Room 1007, East Huron, at 9
«mn. Chairman, E. S. Bordm.
Doctoral Examination for Albert
Michael Katz, Speech; thesis: "A His-
torical Study of Jacques Copeau and
the Vieux-Colombier Company at the
Garrick Theatre in New oYrk City,"
Fri., June 24, East Council Room,
Rackham Bldg., at 1 p.m. Chairman,
W. P. Hnalstead.
(Continued on Page 4)i

worth $10 in the 1957-59 base Miss), announcing this, said tne
period. first witness will be James P.
Boyd Jr.
WASHINGTON - Former Sec- Dodd, who sat in on the com-
retary of the Treasury Douglas mittee's closed hearings, told
Dillon said yesterday economic newsmen he also will testify at the
conditions warrant "a modest public sessions.
- - - - .. - . - _

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Ends Today DIAL 662-6264
"MARY T STARTS
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A RAYlMMN
STROSS, PRODULCTION

RITA IUSHINOIIAM
IN A NEW FILM BY SIDNEY 1 FUIE
OARCTOR OF 'THE IPCRESS IE

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
(Department of Speech) presents
PLAYBILL SUMMER '66
June 29-July 2 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S

July 13-16: Piranudello's ENRICO IV
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