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June 21, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 21,19661",

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JUNE 21 1966

. ._._. .. .. . . ,..may . .

ll

Mississippi March:

Militant

EDITOR'S NOTE: A mood of
militancy and impatience runs
through the words of young
Negroes making the Mississippi
march. It is another problem for
civil rights leaders and com-
pounds divisions within the
movement over the direction,
meaning and motive of the
march.
By DON McKEE
GREENWOOD, Miss. (P)-The
marchers crowded around a leader
alongside U.S. 51 and chanted new
words to an old song.
"I'm comin', I'm comin', but
my head ain't bending low.
"I'm an American-a new, new,
new Negro!"
At a darkened campsite near
Grenada that night, a Negro sat
on the fender of a car and spoke
rapidly, angrily:
"It won't do to pass another law
as a sop to the Negro. There
would be riots upon riots, regard-
less of what people who are sup-
posed to be Negro leaders say."
Somber Prediction,
This somber prediction came
from Ernest Thompson, 33, a big,
muscular man who is vice presi-
dent of the Deacons for Defense
at Jonesboro, La. The Deacons
are an armed organization; they
keep guns in their cars.
"We came with the idea of pro-
viding protection if necessary,"
Thompson said.
"We're not going down the road
intimidating anybody, but at no
time does a Deacon intend to get
his head whipped."
New Militancy
Young Negroes from Mississippi

and elsewhere voiced similar de-
termination, reflecting a new type
of militancy that flies in the face
of the nonviolence preached by
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., one
of the march leaders,
The long,hot walk--its destina-
tion is Jackson, Miss.-has at-
tracted all types, and its objectives
depend on who is doing the talk-
ing.
Unlike the Selma to Montgom-
ery, Ala., march of 1965, which
moved straight to its objective,
the Mississippi march has been
a traveling rally, passing through
10 towns in its first 13 days. Every
night there is a rally, either under
the tents or in a church.
225 Miles
The Alabama pilgrimage was
well organized and kept to a time
table. There were no towns, only
a lonely countryside. It covered
only 50 miles as opposed to 225
between Memphis and Jackson.
The marchers were more serious
and restrained than those in Mis-
sissippi. The Alabama group was
firmly under control of King's
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference and there was no di-
vision of leadership. They were
united in their objectives, primar-
ily to reach the Alabama capital
for a huge demonstration to spur
enactment of the voting rights
bill.
The Mississippi march began as
something of an accident, result-
ing from the ambush ofnJamesH.
Meredith 13 days ago near Her-
nando, Miss. Meredith, wounded
by three blasts of birdshot from
a shotgun, said Friday in New

York he would return to Missis-
sippi tomorrow.
Agree to Nonviolence
King said the Deacons who
joined the Mississippi trek were
laying down their guns. But
Thompson said that while he had
agreed UO nonviolence in the
march, he was not excluding self
defense.
"W e w 11l try everything,"
Thompson said. "At least the man
won't say we didn't try. But we
have been on this nonviolent di-
rect action for a pretty good while.
I think it's about time for a
change.
King-No Violence
"If the white man won't listen,
maybe we ought to start killing.
Then he might listen."
If King's way does not work,
"he is going to have to join us,"
said Thompson. When told of that,
King said he would never embrace
violence, and reiterated that
marchers had agreed to non-
violence.
But King did not hear some of
the talk among marchers.
One man trudged along the
pavement in Batesville and talked
about the trucks that had driven
dangerously close to the marchers.
"Damn sure better kill me if
he hits me," the man said. "If he
don't, I'll pull him out of that
car."
'Fight for Rights'
Nathaniel Buckley, 18, of Bates-
ville, was asked why he joined the
march.
"I think I should fight for my
rights."
Would he fight if attacked by
whites?

"If they hit me, yes, I
Roy Ellis, 17, said he wa
ing for his rights, to get
to vote and for freedom.
"What would you do if,
by whites?"
"I wouldn't know right7
"Do you believe in nonv
"I do not."
Self-Defense is Mot
A Negro youth wearing
boy hat and jeans smiledE
"I would just have to def
self." He was Fred Ever
Milwaukee, Wis., a distan
he said, to Medgar Evers,,
sissippi NAACP leaderv
slain from ambush.
Aaron Henry, presiden
Mississippi NAACP, talke
possibility of a raciale
.during the march.
"Many of us are trying
sure there will not be a
sion," he said.
Quiet So Far
By the time the march h
ed the half-way point, t
been no confrontation
white spectators and
Most white persons al
route had watched quietl
"If they don't start no
we won't give them none
white woman, watchingr
stream into Grenada. T
been the general white re
suppressed hostility.
Stokely Carmichael,

Negroes
would." chairman of the Student Nonvio-
*s march- lent Coordinating Committee, told
Negroes newsmen that civil rights leaders
had discussed the question of pro-
attacked viding arms for self-defense but
decided against it.
now." No Retaliatory Violence
iolence?" The question of retaliatory vio-
lence was brought up during a
to roadside rally by Robert Green,
g a cow- director of education for the
and said, Southern Conference-headed by
fend my- King.
s, 19, of "The Negro has never retaliated
it cousin, against whites in a mass form in
the Mis- this country," Green said. "The
who was Negro has never systematically re-
taliated against the whites and
t of the we will never do it."
d of the Meredith, however, said Wed-
explosion nesday at a news conference in
Pleasantville, N.Y., that he would
to make stop at nothing to bring Missis-
n explo- sippi's power structure to its knees
if Negroes could not gain respect
from these officials.
had pass- Would he use violence? Mere-
here had dith was silent,
between While SNCC is interested pri-
Negroes. marily in the voter registration
ong the aspect of the march-to thus en-
y. hance its program of political ac-
trouble, tion-King and the SCLC are con-
," said a cerned mainly with new federal
marchers legislation.
That has Significantly, most of the talk
eaction- among marchers has centered on
Negro voter registration and not

HEYNS:

Today's Students Work Hard
To Meet Academic Demands

national the e

enactment laws.

Eastern Michigan Art Show
Features Faculty Paintings

(Continued from Page 1)
appeal to moral values and they
document the hypocrisy of their
elders extensively.
All this has a special message
to young men and women who are
in search of a set of standards
truly their own and which they
can defend. Many students are
uncomfortable about their beliefs,
or lack of them, and their young
colleagues who speak with such
moral conviction and such as-
surance, have, as a result, a con-
siderable impact on them.
The moral confusion in the
adult world doesn't help. It is
responsible for the fact that the
student, groping for standards of
behavior, exudes an unhappiness
with things as they are. Many
students are particularly disap-
pointed with the faculty for failing
to help them to find meaning for
their lives.
Influence on World
College students today have had
an unusual amount of influence
on the world around them. In
their homes, as children, they par-
ticipated in decisions about family
purchases and vacations. In ele-
mentary and high schools, they
had an increasing effect on the
way these institutions are govern-
ed. In fact, universities have not
kept pace with these trends. For
many, becoming a university stu-
dent has meant a more subordi-
nate role, with less influence than
they had had before coming.
Much of the character of the
present determination to influence
the academic life reflects, I think,
the fact that the mechanisms of
student participation are inade-
quate and the fact that areas in
which participation is sought in-
elude the most hallowed, and the
most earnestly protected from stu-
dent interference, namely, aca-
demic affairs.
This is not to exaggerate stu-
dent interests in dictating curri-
culum or telling professors how
and what to teach. Indeed, our
experience has been that students
may in fact neglect even the best
opportunities to debate and dis-
cuss academic issues with the fac-
ulty or "The Establishment." They
do, however, want to have visible,
viable, and effective machinery
for stating their views.
I foresee an increase in the
development of such machinery,
particularly in the schools, col-
leges and departments of the uni-
versity. The techniques that are
most likely to work are those that
involve students in consultation
rather than in decision making.
What students think, is very im-
portant and students are expert

in what they think. Unquestion-
ably, we must develop more tech-
niques to ascertain informed and
responsible student opinion.
American institutions and the
society generally have been
strengthene'd by the annual infu-
sion of graduates of American
universities and colleges. Over the
years they have provided crucial
skills and a basic commitment to
the republic,
Their attitudes, values, and their
attributes of mind and heart have
given our country great flexibility,
resourcefulness and a readiness to
assume world-wide leadership.
This generation will be no excep-
tion; indeed those of us who work
with them on a daily basis con-
fidently expect even more from
them than their predecessors have
given.
Aspirations and Reality
Many of us have observed that
this generation is concerned about
the discrepancy between the as-
pirations of our society and its
performance. My colleagues in an
excellent study observe that "as
these students see it, while the
dominant group claims to cham-
pion freedom, religion, patriotism,
and morality, it produces and
condones slums, racial segregation,
migrant farm laborers, false ad-
vertising, American economic im-
perialism and the bomb."
No one can tell whether disil-
lusionment is more acute in this
generation; I think it unlikely
that it is. The difference, if there
is an important one, seems to me
to be in the way young people

respond to the inevitable distance
between human aspirations and
human behavior.
The distinctive character of to-
day's campus lies in the special
use of the techniques of political
and social power as the means of
response. There is a great appeal
in attacking the organization from
outside it, in negotiating from a
position of power. Basic to this
theory of social action is the pro-
position that institutions do not
change from within if left to
themselves. The people in them
are satisfied with things as. they
are, are fearful of changing them,
are powerless to alter them, or in
fact act out the roles the institu-
tion demands.
Sit-Ins Not Suitable
I see signs that students are
recognizing that-however useful
they may behunder certain cir-
cumstances-the techniques of the
strike, the boycott, the sit-in are
not in the long run suitable for
educational institutions, nor In-
deed as the methods of choice for
instiutions in the society at large.
This insight is coming slowly,
and it could be speeded up in two
ways: on the campus, by improv-
ing the processes for change, par-
ticularly by\ making the decision-
making apparatus more sensitive
to student opinions and ideas. Off
the campus, in business, govern-
ment and other social institutions,
by providing more evidence that
an individual with ideas can make
a difference, that there is a re-
siliency and a flexibility in "The
Establishment."

4
A:

CALT OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication,
TUESDAY, JUNE 21
Day Calendar
Insitute on College and University
Administration - Rackham Assembly
Hall, 9 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Managing for Improved Morale;
and Productivity": Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m.
General Notices
Grades-Spring 1966-IIIA: Instruc-
tor lists have been sent to depart-
ments for submission of Spring grade
reports. It is anticipated that all grade
reports will be submitted to the De-
partmental Offices or the Registrar's
Office within 72 hours of the final
examination. The Registrar's Office
will provide grade pickup on the cen-
tral campus on June 23, 24 and 27-29.+
Grades may also be submitted directly
to the office during regular office
hours at Window A, Administration
Bldg. Questions pertaining to grade re-
ports may be directed to 764-6292.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tora programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 784-2148.
Mr. and Mrs. Odinge Odera. Mr.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
* , s
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture-discussion (informal), Tues., June
21, 7:30 p.m., 3RD, Union.
U. of M. Judo Club, Practice resumes,
plus instruction for beginners, Tues.,
June 21, 4:30-6:30 p.m., I-M Bldg.

Odera, editor, East Africa Journal,
East Africa Institute of Social and
Cultural Affairs, Kenya, Africa, and
Mrs. Odera, certified nurse, social wel-
fare nurse for Kisumu Municipality,
Kenya, Africa, June 20-July 22.
Rong-yaw Lin, senior specialist, Min-
istry of Justice, Taipei, Taiwan, Re-
public of China, June 22.
Dr. Prasop Ratanakorn, director of
Prasat Neurological Hospital, Thailand,
June 22-25
Choon-Hak Cho (Korea), student at
University of Hawaii, June 22-25.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Mount Zion Hospital and Medical"
Center, San Francisco, Calif.-Invite
medical tech. grads for all kinds of
employment opportunities. Immediate
opening for Clinical Lab. Tech., ASCP.
Calif. license required.
Korhumnen Steel and Aluminum Co.,
Evanston, I11.-Division of Nat'l. Steel
Corp. Service center for variety of
steel and aluminum product needs
sales trainees, productionplanning
trainees and general management
trainees. Contact, send resume, and in-
terviews will be conducted in Evanston.
Alco Products, Inc., Schenectady,'N.Y.
--Foreign and domestic service engi-
neers for diesel-electric, locomotives -
mechanical, electrical or general engi-
neering degree or comparable exper-
ience. Instrumentation engineer, de-
sign instrumentation used in research
on diesel engines. BS desirable.
Local Professional Review, Ann Arbor,
Mich.-Need librarian with Masters in
Lib. Set. Some math bkgd. desirable,
Editing work or library experience
preferred. Some foreign language abil-
ity needed.
David Taylor Model Basin, Wash., D.C.
-Naval Architect in Hydromechanics.
Degree in engineering or naval archi-
tecture and three years of professional

experience, one of which must
naval field.

be

State of Michigan - Ingham and
Wayne Counties. Data Processing su-
pervisors on several levels needed. Peo-
ple with degrees in math, statistics or
accounting and some experience in
computer operations, total of three
years experience, are best qualified,
Application for examination must be
received before July 11, applications at!
the Bureau.
Veterans Administration Regional Of-
flee, Chicago, 11.-Vocational Rehabili-
tation Specialist, three yrs, general edu-
cation nature, three of specialized work
in any of the following: vocational re-
habilitation or guidance and teaching
or in school for disabled, placement ac-
tivities for disabled. Degree substituted
for three years of exper., majors in
psych., ed., social work, personnel,
of guid. and counsel.
State of Connecticut, Cromwell or
Ansonia, Conn.-Opportunities for those
having completed 6 mos. military and
qualified for security clearance for ra-
dar technicians and missile technicians,
no specific exper. necessary.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAn,.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Detroit Diesel Division of General
Motors. Two Locations in Detroit -
Apply for jobs at 13400 West Outer Dr.
Ask for Mr. Bachman.
Huck Manufacturing Co., Detroit,
Mich.-Looking for man for factory
work.
Good Humor Co., Detroit, Mich. -
You can make up to $125 a week
if you work hard. Open to men and
women.
* * *
Details at Summer Placement Service,
212 SAB, Lower Level.

Ypsilanti, the home of the Big
Blue "Y." Why? It is the location
of the Ypsilanti Greek Theatre
and it is also the home of Eastern
Michigan University.
Also in Ypsilanti on Michigan
Ave. (next to Haabs) there is a
shop called Kreig's Kraft. In the
window are two signs: one adver-
tising the big blue "Y" Greek
Theatre, the other advertising the
Eastern Michigan faculty art
show. Shown here are composi-
tions in paint, charcoal and clay
by the EMU art faculty.
Alvin Loving Jr., whose draw-
ings are done in multi-colored
pastel, works to create an op-art
effect with gridded, criss-cross
patterns drawn over brightly col-
ored forms and figures.
In contrast are the paintings
by Dorothy Lamming in which
subtle colors are worked into an
abstract composition. The colors
with which she works are mostly
soft greens, blues and reds.
Jan Field, who also works with
abstract design, exhibits very ac-
tive compositions which work
through and against each other
by use of fine brush strokes and
thick texture. His main effect is
that of sharp figures moving
through space.
Use of glowing colors and mov-
ing solid objects through space
are displayed by Miriam Brumer.
Miss Brumer's paintings are me-
tallic colored shimmering squares
which appear to be in motion
against a textured background of
PH. 482-2056
NO WSOWCARPINTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING

integrated yellows, whites and
oranges. There is a certain ex-
urberance in these paintings in
spite of the compartively geo-
metric design.
Edward Eichel has used lead
pencil in sensitive drawings of
interior designs and figures whose
delicate lines work to create a
mood.
A stained glass effect is pro-
duced by the vividly colored prints
of Ruth Weisberg who displays
three cuts run off by a special
method which allows for multi-
colored designs. Her woodcuts
produce a certain flourescent ef-
feet which is used as effective il-
lustration of mythical and poetic
scenes.
There are also two potters ex-
hibiting in the show: Suzanne
Stephenson and John Loree, who
both exhibit richly colored deli-
cate pot designs, using subtle
toned metallic colors with an ef-
fective dripping and blending
technique.
The exhibit will be running un-
til July 2; it is worthwhile to
those who visit the big "Y," whe-
ther or not their intentions be
Greek.

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR:
PRESTON STU RGES

14;

uli~a4,

7haoeI4

(]941)
Seldom seen ... yet critically praised
Starring
JOEL McCREA and VERONICA LAKE
SHORT: "A CHILD'S CHRISTMAS IN WALES"
with Dylan Thomas' narration
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS

JRMM

DIAL 8-6416
ENDS WEDNESDAY

Diel 3 T4
662-6264 _ ..._... ___-_-_-- _-___

Ending Wednesday
At 1:30-4:00
6:30 and 9:05

SEE IT AGAIN AND AGAIN!
WALT DISNEY'S
IA-_ "

"ONE OF THE BEST PICTURES I'VE SEEN
pltS Y EA 'R! Brendan Gill, The New Yorker
"A PICTURE OF
"PULSES WITH THE TEMPO
DISTINCTION!" OF YOUTH AND THE SOUND
"FASCINATING!" OF TRUTH -A TRIUMPH"'
-imeMa ine --JudithCrist, N.Y. Herald Tribune
STARM'
II LEE PLATT
RS.TS RITA TUSHINGHAM
STROSS PRODUCTIONII N A NEW FILM BY SIDNEY J. FURIE.
: TU IRECtOR OF 'THE K RESS FILE'
1nTHR D-S
THURSDAY *
"Red Desert" & "Moment of Truth"

1'

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
(Department of Speech) presents
PLAYBILL
SUMMER '66

I'l

COMING-JUNE 29-JULY 2

4I

0 STARTS THURSDAY 0
DORIS ROD ARTHUR li
DAY TAYLOR GODFREY' G
IN PANAVSIOW AND METROCOLOR

$5.00 DEPOSIT HOLDS RESERVED SEATS

I ThISLAT DIRBLU I
CBY DEUXE Shown at 8:40 & 12:35
ALSO * Frankie Avalon
,1H ,E.BARE-AS-you.
DABE IS THE RULEL
Shown at 10:50 only
Pius "LADDER-UP" - Color
SPORTS IN ACTION
2 COLOR CARTOONS
~MCg s mf ASTA*e'G
PLUS -
IWA.TER READE-4TERLNG PRESENTS

I
I

i

k/it tei' 4

G. M I C H I GIIM

ENDING TONIGHT
"STOP THE WORLD, 1 WANT
TO GET OFF!"

by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

I

0 0 STARTS WEDNESDAY@f "
-From an Editorial in
The Washington Daily News
"WILDLY SHAKEN BY
LAUGHTER, WE FEEL IT
OUR BOUNDEN DUTY TO
WARN OUR READERS THAT
THEY MAY NEVERABE
QUITE THE SAME AGAIN.
"ONE OF THE BEST IN A
LONG TIME! ALAN ARKIN'S
POTENTIAL IS VIRTUALLY
UNLIMITED. IT IS A WON-
DERFUL PERFORMANCE!"
-Life Magazine
hr
! ~we towel t.

JULY 13-16
ENRICO IV
by LUIGI PIRANDELLO
JULY 20-23
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY
by HAROLD PINTER
AUGUST 3-6
BLITHE SPIRIT
by NOEL COWARD
AUGUST 10-13
OPERA DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
IN MOZART'S
COSI FAN TUTTE

Tale

11

11

11

~' / ~ ~rn u u U U U ~i.~A~"' / U I w

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