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June 16, 1966 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-16

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THURSDAY, JUNE16, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THURSDAY, JUNE16, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A MXJV4'

cf

BACKS KY:

Military Government
Pln ExeddTr

Hue Crackdown Begins
As Paratroopers Arrive

MAJOR SHIFTS:
NATO Prepares for Move,
U.S. Military Leaves France

SAIGON (P-The military gov-
ernment's decision to extend its
term of office to 1967, wholly
backing the plan of Premier Nguy-
en Cao Ky for a step-by-step re-
turn of civilian rule, stirred new
signs of disarray yesterday in the
divided Buddhist opposition.
Some said their followers will
boycott the Sept. 11 election of a
Constituent Assembly, whose du-
ties will be limited by junta or-
ders to writing a constitution. That
would mean they would be un-
represented in this body, forerun-
ner of a Legislative Assembly that
the government proposes to have
elected next year.
I The moderate head of the Bud-
dhist Institute, Thich Tam Chau,
left town. Apparently unable to
come up with an effective plan
for , anti-government action, he
went to the coastal city of Vung
Tau.
In Chau's absence, lower-rank-
ing monks clung to the theme:
"Down with the government and
its American supporters." Bud-
dhists took to Saigon streets for
the third straight day of small-
scale demonstrations, all quickly
dispersed by police firing tear gas.
Ky Unconcerned
Premier Ky declared these dem-
onstrations are insignificant. He
emphasized his lack of concern
with a field trip to U.S. military!
units cleaning up the Kontum
battle area, 280 miles north of this
city, of remnants of North Viet
Nam's 24th Regiment.
Of the Saigon outbreaks, Ky told
newsmen:
"How many people were involv-
ed there? At the most 5000."
Shadowing the allied victory
over the North Vietnamese regi-
ment was an intelligence report
that two fresh regiments total-
, ing perhaps 3000 men have cross-
ed into South Viet Nam's central
highlands from Laos. Six such
regiments have recently been re-
ported in staging areas across
the frontier.
The word from intelligence
quarters was that the 34th and
38th Regiments were digging in

as the vanguard for a drive dur-
ing the current monsoon, while
seasonal rains at times hamper
U.S. air power.
Replace Dissenters
In his news conference, Ky said
order will be re-established soon
in the dissident northern city of
Hue. He threatened to replace
those officers who disobey govern-
ment orders.
Asked whether he himself would
be a candidate for the Constituent
Assembly, Ky said: "I am not
planning to seek office. I don't
know, maybe if some friends ask
me.'
The enigmatic answer was in
keeping with the premier's past
attitude. Western diplomats and
political observers believe that Ky,

as well as the chief of state, Nguy-
en Van Thieu, intend to remain
in power-in one form or another
Decree Soon
The election law is expected
to be promulgated in a decree this
weekend in connection with Ky's
first anniversary in office. As pic-
tured by the junta's secretary-
general, Maj. Gen. Pham Xuan
Chieu, it follows lines of the pre-
mier's declaration to newsmen
here May 7.
Pressed at that time by a vocal
Buddhist minority to resign, he
said he expected to stay in power
until the middle of next year be-
cause the Constituent Assembly's
task would be limited to writing
a constitution and a second elec-
tion would be required.

HUE, South Viet Nam (A') -
South Vietnamese paratroopers
moved into Hue at dawn early to-
day to clamp government control
on this rebel city.
The government force of about
500 airborne troops arrived from
Phu Bai air base about eight miles
away.
Their arrival was greeted with
a noisy outbreak by Buddhists,
who beat on tin cans and other
metal with sticks.
The predominantly Buddhist
population of 160,000 was aroused
by the troop arrival. The clande-
stine "struggle movement" radio
immediately went on the air,
broadcasting announcements in-
terspersed with chanted prayers.
Several thousand people moved
into the streets, which for more
than a week have been blockaded
with small Buddhist household
altars as a gesture of protest
against the Saigon government.
It appeared that Premier Ngu-
yen Cao Ky intended to crack
down at last on Hue in much the
way he did on Da Nang last
month. At Da Nang, government
troops quelled the Buddhist re-
bellion after a week of fighting.
Ky told newsmen yesterday that
he hoped to "solve the remaining
problem" of rebellious Hue in a
few days.

Meanwhile, Thich Venerable Tri
Quang, influential Buddhist lead-
er, started on the ninth day of a
hunger strike to protest the Ky
government and the U.S. policy of
supporting it.
The 42-year-old monk was in
Hue Municipal Hospital, which he
entered three days after starting
the fast June 8. At the time he
said he would fast until Premier
Ky and Chief of State Nguyen
Van Thieu resigned.
The paratroopers spent the
night on the outskirts of Hue. At
dawn they moved into the city.
Troops of the Vietnamese 1st
Division apparently were divided
as 'to the limitations of their co-
operation with the paratroopers.
About 1,500 troops of the division
are stationed in Hue.
Some of these troops merely
stood by as the paratroopers re-
moved Buddhist altars from the
streets and dispersed lingering
crowds. Tear gas was used on
several occasions.
Other 1st Division soldiers of-
fered what one observer described
as half-hearted cooperation. A few
pitched in and helped the para-
troopers.
Three Buddhists were treated at
a first aid station after being
overcome by tear gas, but there
were no reports of major disorders.

ASPAC Denounces Nuclear
Tests, Will Be Nonmilitary

SEOUL (gy)-Nine Asian and Pa-
cific nations, banded together in
a new non-military association
called "ASPAC," weighed yester-
day a final communique on Viet
Nam and a denunciation of nu-
clear tests.
Informants said all participants
in the three day Asian-Pacific
ministerial conference were agreed
on mentioning the Vietnamese
war but there was disagreement
on wording.
. A majority headed by the Phil-
ippines, South Viet Nam and South
Korea, was said to favor a strong
statement in behalf of South Viet
Nam; others led by Japan favor-
ed a mild statement.
There appeared no disagreement
over the denunciation of nuclear
testing which will apply to both
Communist China and France.
France plans tests in the Pacific.
Foreign Minister Thanat Kho-
man of Thailand said the new as-
sociation formed yesterday will be
informal and will require no trea-
ty.
He told reporters two names

were suggested, "the Council for
Asian and Pacific Cooperation" or
"the Asian and Pacific Coopera-
tion Council" but the main idea
was to preserve the ASPAC des-
ignation.I
The founders denied that they
were banding against anyone. But
all the participants are non-Com-
munist nations, and it could po-
tentially bolster their security by
promoting economic and social de-
velopment.
The members are Japan, South
Korea, South Viet Nam, National-
ist China, the Philippines, Thai-
land, Malaysia, Australia and New
Zealand. Laos attended as an ob-
server and may join.
Khoman, who will be first chair-
man of the association, said the
council will meet annually.
Just how strong the association
will be depends on how much pow-
er its members grant it. Japan,
Australia, New Zealand and Ma-
laysia have indicated they want it
to be little more than a forum for
consultation. The other countries
seem to be aiming for something
more solid.

PARIS (M)-The North Atlanticl
Treaty Organization set to work
yesterday to streamline its mili-
tary organization and prepare for
moves imposed upon it by Presi-
dent Charles de Gaulle.
Defense Secretary Robert S. Mc-
Namara announced in Washington
that all U.S. military planes and
some war stocks will be pulled out
of France. He gave details at a
news conference of major shifts of
servicemen, dependents and sup-
plies from France to other NATO
countries following de Gaulle's
order to leave.
By Sept. 1, the United States
will transfer two squadrons of
C-130 transport planes, totaling 32
aircraft, to Britain. After that,
six squadrons totaling 90 Air
Force reconnaissance planes will
be shifted from France.
A total of 7500 military and
civilian personnel and 10,700 de-
pendents will be involved in the
two shifts.
French Withdraw
At the same time France offi-
cially informed its NATO partners
in a meeting of the permanent
NATO council that it had with-
drawn 15 planes from duty in
West Germany as part of de
Gaulle's decision to pull out of
NATO's military command by July
1.
The French, however, said they
had not made a decision yet on the
other French air units in West
Germany.
France is said to have some 45
planes still in Germany.
In other business, the council,
which acts as the alliance's board
of directors, fixed July 1 as the
date to scrap the Standing Group,
NATO's highest military body.
The. action, ordered by NATO
foreign ministers in Brussels, Bel-
glum, a week ago, is part of a
move aimed at making the alli-
ance more efficient and cutting
down on its multiple separate
structure.
Group Replaced
The Standing Group, based inj
Washington and composed of rep-
resentatives of the United States,
Britain and France, will be re-
placed soon by an international
Welcome Students

integrated staff. This staff will
work closely with Supreme Head-
quarters Allied Powers Europe --
SHAPE-which is to be moved
to Belgium, near Brussels.
The NATO military commit-
tee, on which all the alliance
members are represented, will han-
dle the Standing Group's func-
tions meantime.
The NATO council also took
steps to knit closer together the
separate land and air force com-
mands in central Europe.
The commands are now located
at Fontainebleau, near Paris, and
the new headquarters will go eith-
er to one of the Benelux countries
--Belgium, The Netherlands and
Luxembourg-or to West Ger-

World News Roundup

WASHINGTON (T) - President
Johnson said yesterday the gov-
ernment will make no compromise
on civil rights compliance under
medicare and issued this appeal to
about 1500 still-uncertified hospi-
tals: "Please comply."
At a White House meeting of
administration officials and about
200 medical and hospital associa-
tion leaders, Johnson asked that
the health professions give strong
leadership in getting medicare off
to a successful start on July 1, by:
-Making clear to every com-
munity that hospital race dis-
crimination could make medicare
unavailable to the area's elderly
citizens.
-Restricting a possible "grow-

many. The council asked for r
ommendations by members or
new commander for the combir
central European staff si
French Gen. Jean Crepin, t
present commander, will, be wit
drawn in two weeks by de Gaull
De Gaulle is cutting all
forces from the NATO militz
command July 1, and has orde:
SHAPE and other NATO inst
lations out of France by July
1967.
The council also began prelL
inary discussions on the role a
mission of France's forces in W
Germany after they are pul
out of NATO. A special meeting
the subject will be held next we

Compliance To Civil Right
Laws Seen for Medicare,

ing pressure toward higher price
for hospital and medical services
which, he said, may come wit
the start of medicare.
-Standing firm against thos
"who would abuse their new pri.
ileges under medicare-who de
mand unnecessary treatment o
hospital care."
-Helping solve the problem o
possible overcrowding in thos
areas where hospitals already ar
pushing their capacity and med
care will add to the patient load.
"We have started the countdow
for medical care in this country
the President told the hospiti
administrators and state and n&
tional officers of the America
Medical Association.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
States yesterday announced the
resumption of full economic assist-
ance to India and Pakistan.
The decision, announced by a'
State Department spokesman, did
not apply to military arms or
weapons to either nation.
Press officer Robert J. McClos-
key said the governments of
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of
India and President Ayub Khan
of Pakistan have been advised of
the U.S. decision.
S *
CHICAGO-Police carried their
cluster-busting strategy into a
second night yesterday in efforts
to maintain peace, however un-
easy, in a riot-torn Puerto Rican
district.

71 ................... ... .
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
I................s........MMMM MG uigg2% MM~a MM MMMM MM .,.,.*,. . ... ...............

OTTAWA - Canada disclosed
yesterday it has sent a Mandarin-
speaking special envoy, Chester
Ronning, to Hanoi again. He pre-
sumably would renew soundings of
Ho Chi Minh's government on
prospects of ending the Viet Nam
war.
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.-James
H. Meredith said yesterday he will
return Monday to his Mississippi
march if his doctor permits. He
criticized the leaders who have
taken it over in his absence.
"There seems to be a good bit
of show going on down there and
they-Mississippi Negroes-are not
used to that," Meredith told a
news conference.
* *
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Presi-
dent Sukarno declared his oppo-
sition yesterday to rising clamor
that the legislative and judicial
branches be independent of the
executive. He also said Parliament
should not advocate the liberal
type of Western Democracy.
Speaking at a palace ceremony,
Sukarno said the theory of the
separation of power between the
legislative, executive and judicial
bodies has to be abandoned. He
did not elaborate.
', *, *
WASHINGTON - A House sub-
committee voted yesterday to give
the attorney general broad new
powers to protect Negroes rights
but broke up in disagreement
over an open housing proposal.
Confronted with a wide range
of opinions on the controversial
housing section of the administra-
tion's civil rights bill, Chairman
Emanuel Celler (D-NY) put off
action on it until today.

TODAY:

4:10 P.M.

Arena Theatre, Frieze Buldng

JEAN GENET'S
THE MAIDS
and
ROBERT PINGET'S
ARCHITRUC

I

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
ADMISSION FREE

1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for pubtlcation.
THURSDAY, JUNE 16
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Work-
shop-"Advanced Employment Inter-
viewing": Michigan Union, 8:30 am,
Introduction to Numerical Control'
Workshop-Cooley Bldg., North Cam-
pus, 8:30 a.m.
Student Laboratory Theatre-The U.
of M. Dept. of Speech presents its
16th and final Student Laboratory
Theatre presentation of the 1965-66
season, Jean Genet's "The Maids"
and Robert Pinget's "Architruc." One
admission-free performance, Thurs.,
June 16, 4:10 p.m., Arena Theatre,
Frieze Bldg.
General Notices
Ushers: Ushers are needed for the
Summer Series of piano concerts which
will be given in Rackham Aud. in
July. Anyone who may be interested
in ushering for this series may sign
up at the Box Office of Hill Aud. on
Thurs.,tJune 16. from 7 p.m.uto 9
p.m. See Mr. Warner.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 BAB.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, June 16 and every
Thursday, 7:30 p.m., 3545 BAB,
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction, open to everyone,
every Fri., 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym,
Newman Student Association, Comn-
munityamass and supper, June 17, 5
p.m., 331 Thompson.

Doctoral Examination for David
Frank Gray, Astronomy; thesis; "Pho-
tometric Determination of Stellar Ra-
dii," Thurs., June -*, 817 Physics-As-
tronomy Bldg., at 9 a.m. Chairman, 0.
C. Mohler.
Doctoral Examination for Walter Gale
Briggs, Meterology; thesis: "Measure-
ment and Analysis of the Structure of
Turbulence Near the Ground with a
Hot wire Anemometer System," Fri.,
June 17, Room 221 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman, D. J.
Portiman.
Doctoral Examination for Charles Fed-
dema, Botany; thesis: "Systematic
Studies in the Genus Sclerocarpus and
the Genus Aldama (Compositae),"
Thurs., June 16, 1139 Nat. ScL Bldg.
at 9 a.m. Chairman, Rogers McVaugh.
:Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT :
U.S. Civil Service Commission, De-
troit, Mich.: Announcement of exam-
inations for a Rent Suppdement Spe-
cialist for the Department of Housing
and Urban Development, Federal Hous-
ing Administration. Total of six yrs.
exper., three specialized in real es-
tate, studies in housing, govt. pro-
grams, public housing, etc. Degree
can be subs, for three years of ex-
per. Obtain applications at the Bureau,
will be notified of test date and loca-
tion for month of August.

POSITION OPENINGS:
Owens-Illinois Technical Center, To-
ledo, Ohio-Numerous openings for all
engineering degrees, some for new
grads. Non-engineering degree openings:
Estimator-Clerk-Administrative assist-
ant, exper. as estimator. Chemistry de-
gree openings: two for PhD with con-
siderable administrative exper.; two
for BS or MS with some exper.; one
for BS with no exper.
United Cerebral Palsy of Delaware
County, Chester, Pa.-Speech Therapist
for out-patient unit In suburban Phila.
Thiskol Chemical Corp., Job Corps
Urban Training Center, Clearfield, Utah
--Openings for teachers with or with-
out teaching degrees for technicalwand
vocational skills, automotive, refrigera-
tion, heating, air-conditioning, chemi-
cals, plastics, food industries, medical,
veterinary, farm. Degrees not required
for some.
Sinclair Petrochemicals, Inc., Chica-
go, Il.-Sales trainee, training for one
year and assume representative sales
responsibilities. New grad with major
in Chem., with one year of organic
chem.
City of Philadelphia, Pa.-Finance-
Budget Officer for Police Dept. Bach-
elor's and foui yrs. of administrative
exper. in large public jurisdiction, util-
ity, or corporation. Applications for
examination may be obtained by writ-
ing to Room 127, City Hall, Phila., Pa.
Residency requirements are waived for
this position.
WWTV, Cadillac, Mich.-Mature news-
writer-newscaster for an important late
evening newscast. Station of award

winning newscast, requires profession-
ally trained man.
City of Sandusky, Ohio-City engi-
neering dept. needs one full time civil
engineer. Near Lake Erie, Cedar Point.
* * *

Open 6 Days a Week
U-M BARBERS
Near Kresqe's
OR
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near the Michigan Theatre
-AIR CONDITIONED--

CAMPUS MAST'S SKOP

619 East Liberty

662-0266

For further information
764-7460, General Division,
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

please call
Bureau of

I

I

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVlCE:
212 SAB-
Waltham Grinding Wheel Co., De-
troit, Mich.-Looking for students age
20 or over for work in office or ware-
house.
Camp Nahelu, Ortonville, Mich.-Will
interview here for counselors Wed.,
June 15, for students finishing school
June 24. Good opportunity to start
work immediately. Details at Summer
Placement Service, SAB, Lower Level.
Details at 212 SAB, Lower Level.

--

N OW! L 616
DIAL 8-64 16

TONIGHT
AT
7 and 9 P.M.

Skip through town this spring and summer in
these new round-toe, tiny-heeled Cloudhopper
pumps by Oomphies. In fashion's newest tex-
ture-woven Swiss nylon straw-for longer wear,
easy care. Cloudhoppers sponge clean in seconds,
stay bright. Color-matched trim.
Colors: Neutral, Pink, Pale Blue
cwou4hoppers BY 6~d~

O J(rieq j e//rj6
12 W. Michigan, Ypsilanti
(next to Hoab's)
EMU STAFF SHOW
JUNE 14-JULY 2
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, June 19, 2-5 P.M.
U Brumer Lamming
Eichel Loving
Field Weisberg
t}"°."" '^s"" '<" "'<"||~{ !:| C' ' t} <" }! '"" }, {|""" {<""t "> ""> <|""
ENDS TODAY
"ONE OF THE SLICKEST, FUNNIEST, BEST-ACTED
WESTERN COMEDIES TO COME DOWN THE TRAIL
THIS YEAR!" -Detroit News

"ONE OF THE BEST PICTURES I'VE SEEN
THiS YEARi" -~--nd-n G-,,, b .t
"A PICTURE OF
DISTINCTION!".PULSES WITH THE TEMPO
-SauCda Rview OF YOUTH AND THE SOUND
"FASCINATING!" OF TRUTH '-A TRIUMPH!"
--am.Magaozne a-,udit" r*V " Htribe.,.
R. LEE PLAiT R IT AIn________
A MRYMOND______
STROS PRODUCTION IN iA NEWO BY CfStNEY 1. FURZE,

w

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"RED DESERT"

11

COMING:

I

m.....mm........mmm ..... .....u .....mmmmm .
r r
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FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR
r r
MICHAEL CURTIZ
r r
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e ei W
r r
* (1941)
r r
H Jack London's powerful sea drama ;
r performed by an outstanding cast.
r r
r r
Starring
EDWARD G. ROBINSON (as "Wolfe" Larsen),
JOHN GARFIELD, IDA LUPINO,
. .. . .. - . . - - - - .

Passport Pictures
Application Pictures
Group Pictures
Wedding Pictures
Available at any time
Ready Quickly
CALL NO 3-6966

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JASON ROBARDS
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