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June 04, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-04

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SATURDAY, JUNE 4,1966

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

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.

Buddhist Leader Calls foi

*B-oycott
Nun Added
To Number
Of Suicides
Religious Militants
Threaten To Wreck
Ky's Peace Moves

of Viet Elections

SAIGON (M)-The militant wing
of South Viet Nam's divided Bud-
dhist movement threatened yes-
terday to wreck renewed govern-
ment peace efforts. Further cloud-
ing the issue was a Buddhist nun's
suicide by fire, the sixth such
self immolation this week.
Among the make-or-break fac-
tors that could ultimately influ-
ence American involvement in the
war against the Viet Cong and
against social and economic ills of
South Viet Nam:
To Boycott Elections
-Influential Thich Tri Quang,
chief of the militants, proclaimed
at a news conference in Hue that
he will order the Buddhists to
boycott any elections held by the
government this year. Specifically
that meant the vote, scheduled for
Sept. 11, to choose a constituent
assembly.
Heckled since he led Buddhists
into a compromise with govern-
ment representatives Wednesday
that calls for the addition of 10
civilians to the ruling 10-man
military directorate, moderate
Thich Tam Chau submitted his
resignation as head of the Bud-
dhist Institute. He said, "I have
failed." A special council will be
convoked to weigh the resignation.
Ky Seeks Advice
Premier Nguyen Cao Ky sought
to sound out religious and political
factions on what 10 civilians
should be seated. They are sup-
posed to be named by tomorrow.
The compromise calls for the en-
larged directorate to elect a chair-
man Monday. The current chair-
man is Lt. Gen. Nguyen Van
Thieu, the chief of state.
Nu Bieu Binh, 26, a nun, burned
herself to death in the courtyard
of a small pagoda in Da Nang,
380 miles northeast of Saigon,
where government troops crushed
rebel forces May 23. Monks said
she left behind a letter for Presi-
dent Johnson chargingrthat "Viet-
namese Buddhists were annihilat-
ed by your policies in Viet Nam."
Bombing Renewed
In the war, U.S. airmen pressed
their renewed offensive against
North Viet Nam through low-,
hanging clouds and allied patrols
carried on the hunt for Viet Cong
in the South. Korean troops re-
ported they killed 32 of the enemy,
in an overnight fight in the cen-
tral highlands.
Peculiarities of the Vietnamese
scene were reflected in Hue, where
Quang denounced Americans,'
President Johnson and the Ky
government while Vietnamese
troops who moved into that Bud-
dhist stronghold Thursday were
arresting some of his followers and
seizing rebel arms.
Vietnamese 1st Division troops
occupying Hue seemed to be get-
ting things in hand. Orders were
reported framed for dissidents to3
turn in their weapons by 6 p.m.
today. A U.S. military source said
the troops already have collected
172 weapons and arrested 14 per-l
sons in connection with antigov-
ernment activities.t
Other Action
Political and military anglest
shared attention abroad:
-UN Secretary-General Ur
Thant believes he could not send
election observers to South Viet
Nam on his own authority, a
spokesman said in New York.x
Other quarters expressed doubt
that the Security Council or thef
General Assembly would authorizet
observers, as requested by Ky's
government Thursday.
-A State Department spokes-c
man in Weshington, Robert J. Mc-I
Closkey, said the United States isc
still actively trying to determinet
what North Viet Nam would do
about halting infiltration of troops
to the South if American planes
quit bombing the North. As to
whether Hanoi had shown any
interest in making a deal, Mc-

Closkey said, "I find no evidence
of that."

Teachers'
Strike Hurts
Detroit
Flint Schools Also
Affected; Romney
Attempts Settlement
DETROIT (M)-Teachers in a
fifth suburban Detroit school dis-
trict struck yesterday and those
in a sixth scheduled anwalkout
for Monday. More money in new
contracts is the goal.
In addition, 55 schools in Flint
remained shut a second day as
teachers there continued a dem-
onstration for higher pay.
More than 82,000 pupils are en-
rolled in the affected Detroit su-
burban and Flint schools. Year-
end closings are scheduled from
next Friday up to June 22.
The Ecorse AFL-CIO Federation
of Teachers broke off negotiations
with the board of education in
that downriver suburb at 1:30 a.m.
Its members began picketing at
7 a.m.
This walkout raised to 61 schools
and 38,830 pupils the number idled
in suburban Detroit. Flint's 55
schools have 44,000 pupils.
The Fitzgerald Education Asso-
ciation in suburban Warren voted
to strike Monday and picket the
Fitzgerald district's six schools.
At Fitzgerald, as in Flint and in
the Detroit suburban Crestwood
district, teachers are represented
by affiliates of the independent
Michigan Education Association.
They choose to term their demon-
strations "professional day pro-
tests."
But William Gayde, Fitzgerald
association president, said "we're
through calling a spade a club"
and would strike and man picket
posts.
Bargaining units affiliated with
the AFL-CIO Michigan Federation
of Teachers have termed their
work stoppages strikes, although
such are prohibited by public em-
ployes under state law.
Pickets carried signs Thursday
declaring "no contract-no work"
at most of the schools involved in
demonstrations.
In Lansing, Gov. George Rom-
ney met with members of the
state labor mediation board. He
then announced he would call a
meeting of state educational lead-
ers in his office Tuesday.j

TOKYO (W)-Communist China
warned today that even its
highest-ranking and oldest leaders
will be struck down mercilessly if
they oppose Mao Tze-tung.
The warning, carried by Peking
People's Daily, came the day after
powerful Peking Mayor Peng Chen
was dismissed as first secretary of
the Peking municipal Communist
party committee.
The party organ's editorial,
quoted by Radio Peking monitored
in Tokyo, did not mention Peng by
name, nor did it indicate whether
the warning was aimed at some
leader even higher than Peng.
There was no indication, how-
ever, that Peng, whose associates
have been caught up in a wave of
denunciation, had been relieved of
his more important Politburo and
secretariat jobs.
General Shakeup
The tenor of the announcement
indicated a shakeup in the party
in the Communist capital, for a
number of other changes were
announced.
Peng was replaced as secretary
of the Peking Central Committee
by Li Hsueh-feng. Li also is a
member of the secretariat and is
first secretary of the Communist
party's North China Bureau.
The announcement of t h e
change did not name Peng, who
has not been reported seen in
public for two months. There have
been numerous reports that he
was marked for the purge.
The purge apparently has en-
tered a new phase, with the party
leadership intensifying its crack-
down and admitting the opposition
is "still very powerful." Editorials
in the official Peking People's
Daily and other published state-
ments this week show that the
cleanup is not having smooth
sailing.
Formerly Mao's Successor
Peng Chen, now 67, reportedly
ranked ninth among Communist
China's leaders and once was re-
garded as a possible successor to
Mao Tze-tung. He has not been
openly accused, but there have
been hints that he was involved
with three men charged with
wanting "to overthrow the leader-
ship of the Chinese Communist
party."

These three, whom Peking re-
peatedly has accused of being trai-
tors, are Wu Han, the vice mayor
of Peking; Liao Mo-sha, a mem--
ber of the Peking party central'
committee, and Teng To, former
editor of the Peking People's Daily.
The campaign against dissidents
started last November as a crack-
down on intellectuals. It has
broadened, with Peking's official
publications calling it a life and
death struggle. They also note
that the Hungarian uprising al-,
most 10 years ago started with an
intellectual revolt.
The People's Daily acknowledg-
ed Wednesday that the campaign
was of purge proportions, saying

it had swept away "a horde of
monsters" entrenched in ideologi.-
cal and cultural positions.
Another People's Daily editorial
Thursday struck a note of con-
cern and urgency and admitted
that "bourgeois ideology is still
very powerful and exerts an im-
mense influence in our country."
It urged Chinese Communists to
"rally under the great banner of
Mao Tze-tung's thought and wage
resolute and relentless struggles
against the antiparty and anti-
socialist bourgeois representa-
tives."
The editorial said that victory
in the struggle could not be taken
for granted.

MAO'S SUCCESSOR:
Party Leader Loses Post in
Chinese Communist Purge

world News Roundup

-Associated Press
THICH TAM CHAU, right, who recently resigned as head of Saigon's Buddhist Institute, talks to
newesmen along with Thich Phap Tri, the institute's deputy chairman.
U.S. Officials Vi0ew War
AsInternal Political Struggle

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President
Johnson told a group of elderly
persons yesterday he will seek an
across-the-board increase in So-
cial Security benefits during the
next Congress.
Johnson said the elderly arel
struggling even though he has
signed into law increases of more
than $1.5 billion a year in Social
Security benefits.
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican
Republic - Joaquin Balaguer's
sweeping victory in the Dominican
presidential race appeared yester-
day to have carried his Reformist
party into control of Congress as
well.

Final unofficial results released
by the National Electoral Junta
gave Balaguer 745,409 to 517,784
for Juan Bosch.
Balaguer's total was 56.3 per
cent, just under the 58 per cent
Bosch got in the 1962 elections.
The results showed colleagues
on the Balaguer ticket ahead in
17 of 22 provinces, with four others
unreported. This was taken as an
indication that Balaguer will have,
as did Bosch in 1962, complete
control of the two-house congress.
Signs mounted, meanwhile, that
Bosch's losing Dominican Revolu-
tionary Party was preparing to
present official charges of fraud.
Official observers from 21 Western
Hemisphere nations have pro-
claimed the elections fair and
honest:

WASHINGTON ()-High ad-
ministration officials both in'
Washington and in Saigon say
they interpret the political tur-
moil in South Viet Nam as an
internal power struggle rather
than a dispute over the American
presence there.
Sources - while emphasizing
current administration thinking is
necessarily tentative - reported
yesterday even so militant a Bud-
dhist leader as Thich Tri QuangI
has told Americans that the real
object of anti-American demon-
strations and violence has been to
win ,American support for Bud-
dhist political objectives.
In essence, the political up-
heaval is picturedhhere as a power
struggle among the South Viet-
namese themselves "behind a
shield of American protection."~
Officials contend the United
States is neithertoptimistic nor
pessimistic about the outlook and
is seeking to be realistic. But
they argue that American military
successes actually paved the way
for the political turmoil.
According to this arg ument, the
very fact that American troop
strength and firepower gained
military supremacy over the Viet
Cong in the troubled 1st Corps
area prompted both Premierl
Nguyen Cao Ky and militant
Buddhists to see a turning of the
tide.
Carrying the argument further,
the officials say that had this not
been so it is doubtful Ky would
have fired the powerful 1st Corps
commander whose ouster sparked
the Buddhist uprising.
Buddhist Bids
The Buddhists, according to the
argument, also saw a turn in the
military tide and decided the time
was ripe to mount a strong bid
for power.
The administration has been en-
couraged by the fact that the Viet
Cong have not capitalized in any
important way on the political
turmoil, though they believed
Communist agents did infiltrate
the Buddhist camp to some extent.
Even when the Saigon govern-
ment lost all control in the Da
Nang-Hue area, the Viet Cong did
not mount a major offensive. Of-
ficials said that the Communists
perhaps were waiting for the mon-
soon season and to assess the
progress of the Buddhist bid to
topple the Ky government.
Military Weakness
However, they expressed the
opinion that the major reason
for the Viet Cong's action, or lack
of it, was reduced military effec-
tiveness.
Encouragement also has been

taken in Washington from the
fact that the ruling military junta
has definitely moved toward the
election of a constitution-drafting
constituent assembly. Officials
believe the Saigon government
cannot back away from the com-
mitment.
The administration is describ-
ed also as pleased that the Ky
government is adding civilians to
the ruling group sooner than many
had expected. Evidence of unity
within the Saigon government also
was welcomed by what they in-
terpreted as a weak public re-
sponse to Buddhist appeals.

Officials have concluded that
the Buddhist militants overesti-
mated their own strength and
underestimated the tenacity of Ky
and his asociates. They say the
Buddhists also miscalculated the
extent to which the United States
would be "spooked," as one official
put it, by anti-American demon-
strations.
The administration contends
that, even within the most mili-
tant Buddhist groups, a more
moderate sentiment seems to be
emerging. However, officials said
they realize the picture could
change abruptly,

T - T -"Mmml

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
tore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication,
SATURDAY, JUNE 31
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-"Bringing Up Baby":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - George Bernard Shaw's
"Misalliance": Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
Events Monday
Center for South and Southeast Asian
Studies Lecture-Clifton R. Wharton,
Jr. "An Agrarian Strategy for U.S.
Foreign Policy in Southeast Asia":
Rackham AmphItheatre, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Candidates who expect to
receive degrees in August, 1966, must
have at least three bound copies (the
original in a "spring binder") of their
dissertation in the office of the Grad-
uate School by Mon., June 20. The re-
port of the doctoral committee on the
final oral examination must be filed
with the Recorder of the Graduate
School together with two copies of the
thesis, which is ready in all respects
for publication, not later than Mon.
July 18.
Doctoral Examination for Arnold Pal-
mer Jacobson, Radiation Biology; thes-
is: "M2easurement of Bioluminescence
and Cellular Respiration during X-Ray
Exposure," Mon., June 6, 3008 SPH, at
1:30 p.m. Chairman, G. H, Whipple.
Doctoral Examination for Fred Henry
Leonard, Economics; thesis: "An Analy-
sis of short-Run Changes in Functional
Income Distribution," Mon., June 6,
208 Economics Bldg., at 4:30 a.m. Chair-
man, K. E. Boulding.

Placement
ANNOUNCLMENT:
Federal Service Entrance Examina-
tion-Due to the large number of po-
sitions still open in Ill., Ind., Kentucky,
Mict., Ohio, and Wis. area the FSEE
will remain open for applications un-
til Aug. 31, 1966. Opportunities cover
wide range of fields. Use application
found at the Bureau of Appointments
or on back page of the FSEE an-
nouncement. Send it to U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission, Main Post Office Bldg.,
Chicago, ill., 60607. Test dates for all
cities in this area will be determined
after sufficient applications are re-
ceived. Applicants will be notified of
time and place of exams.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Metropolitan Hospital, Detroit-Reg-
istered Physical Therapist, degree in
Phys. Ther. plus some experience pre-
ferred, recent graduate acceptable.
Russell Marketing Research, Inc., New
York-Several openings at a trainee
lcvel in all phases of marketing re-
search, field tabulation and project
direction. ePople having course work
in Marketing, Math, Psych., Soc., and
Bus. Ad. are well qualified for this
learning position.
West Virginia Pulp and Paper, De-
troit Office-Industrial sales training
position open for recent grad, prefer
1 or 2 yrs. exper. Initial position as-
sisting in Detroit office, leading to
outside sales job, with probable relo-
cation.
(Continued on Page 4)

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