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June 02, 1966 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-02

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THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1966

THE-' MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MiCHIGAN DAILY A E!

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Ky

Reaches

emporary

Settlement with Buddhist

SAIGON ()-Premier Nguyen
Cao Ky's military government and
his Buddhist critics agreed yester-
day on a formula to give civilians
a voice in guiding South Viet Nam
toward the general election Sept.
11. Buddhist crowds protested the
compromise.
The agreement capped a day
in which students, sacked and
burned the United States Con-
sulate in Hue and a screaming
mob of youths, burned a paper
effigy of President Johnson in
Saigon to emphasize their opposi-
tion to American support of Ky's
regime.
Twenty monks and nuns'doused
themselves with gasoline in the
muddy compound of the Buddhist
Institute and threatened to com-
mit suicide by fire, as five Bud-
dhists had done in the past five
days. But other monks intervened
before a match could flare, and a
loudspeaker of the main pagoda

called for an end to such self
sacrifice.
The militant branch of Viet
Nam's Buddhists, clamoring for
nearly three months for quick
restoration of civilian rule, was
clearly divided on the temporary
settlement reached after two meet-
ings of the ruling generals with
representatives of the church.
Highlights of the compromise
formula:
Ten civilians will be added to
the existing 10-man military di-
rectorate, with June 5 as the tar-
get date. The civilians will be
named by "mass organizations,
religions and political parties." A
communique failed to spell out
exactly how.
The enlarged directorate will
elect a chairman Monday, June 6.
The chairman of the existing
directorate is Lt. Gen. Nguyen Van
Thieu, the Roman Catholic chief
of state.

The enlarged directorate will,
in turn, name a Peoples and Arm-
ed Forces Council to assist the
present war Cabinet in the interim
before the election of a Consti-
tuent Assembly Sept. 11.
War Continues
While there was a lag, in the
ground war in the south, U.S.
squadrons were disclosed to be
using two new weapons to blast
missile sites and antiaircraft guns
in their revived air offensive
against North Viet Nam.
The Air Force told guardedly of
"a new type of ordnance" used
with devastating effect in the
greatest single fighter-bomber as-
sault of the war, a raid on the
Yen Bay supply and railroad com-
plex 80 miles northwest of Hanoi.
A spokesman said 25 antiaircraft
emplacements were silenced. The
raiders were reported to have de-
stroyed 72 warehouses and dam-
aged 44.

Navy fliers are using an im-
proved model of the Bullpup air-
to-ground missile. They report a
high rate of success. A new radar
guidance system helps them to
keep the winged explosive carriers
on target.
The political compromise de-
veloped after a mysterious grenade
attack on one of the leading
monks involved, Thich Thien
Minh.
An unidentified youth hurled
the grenade at Minh's car as it

was entering the gate of t
Buddhist youth center. Inflam
Buddhist youths later burned
U.S. Navy vehicle after runni
off the driver.
Over the smoking wreck of t
Navy Jeep, youths unfurled
banner saying : ".Americans ai
Gen. Ky Will Haveto Pay for t
Death of Thich Thien Mini
They either mistakenly believ
the monk had died or deliberat
madethe statement to prom
further violence.

ACCUSATIONS MOUNT:
See Evidence of Pek
TOKYO (AP) - New evidence Sho and Peng Pei-yun, of trying
emerged yesterday that Commun- to lead "in a wrong direction in
E ist China may be on the verge of opposition to chairman Mao Tze-
a major purge with its leadership tung's teachings."
embroiled in an internal dispute. With mainland China apparently
Accusations mounted against in political turmoil, Soviet Presi-
Tang To, once Red China's lead- dent Nikolai V. Podgorny made a
ing public spokesman, amid in- speech just across the border in
dications he would be brought to Soviet Siberia and said the area of
the trial. There were suggestions that Khabarovsk is strengthening its
led a purge could reach even higher frontier defenses. The Soviet area
a into the ranks of the Chinese has no neighbor except China.
ng Communist Party. China, which had to surrender
Peking Radio reported that even that territory to Tsarist Russia in
he the bulletin boards at Peking Uni-_ the 17th century, has published
a versity were carrying attacks on books and maps claiming it.
nd the university's president, Lu Podgorny did not refer to un-
he Ping, and other high-rank party confirmed reports of shooting in-
d." officials. cidents on the border.
'ed The radio said papers on the Peking, in an exchange of words
ely boards accused Lu and two mem- with Moscow, accused the Soviets
Pte bers of the Communist Party's of betraying Cuba's cause by its
Peking central committee, Sung comments on the dispute between
the United States and Havana
about Guantanamo Bay.
The beginnings of a purge, sim-
CM ilar to that which hit Moscow
before the death of Stalin, occu-
over pied attention of students of
Chinese affairs.
An official Red Chinese weekly
ild hopeful that it will be possible to
m- settle this question in a manner
h- which will foreclose floor debate
on this most sensitive subject and,
m- at the same time, give due regard
el, to the legitimate interest of all
he committees concerned in this
ns field." By The Associated Press
en. The negotiations probably will WASHINGTON - The White
ir- be as sensitive as the issue be- House conference on civil rights
m- cause it involves jealously guarded settled down yesterday to group
-case itnvolvs jaloy uaredn discussions while President John-
Senate status and jurisdictions son promised thorough considera-
tic and the worldwide reputation of tion by the administration of any
tat America s chief i n t e ll i g e n c e ideas that are produced.
he agency. * * *
he Mansfield said an open Senate LANSING-The House approv-
D- row might prove embarrassing to ed a county home rule bill yester-
both the CIA and to senators who day after nearly 16 months of
might say things they would re- work, debate and delay.
id gret later.

ing Purge

T
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magazine, Peking Review, received
in Toyko, added details to recent
revelations of an antiparty group
on mainland China.
'Official Chinese publications
disclosed the existence of the
group on mainland China.
Official Chinese publications
disclosed the existence of the
group last month, charging that
some intellectuals were seeking an
end to Mao Tze-tung's leadership,
Peking radio and the New China
News Agency distributed excerpts
of some of the articles that de-
nounced Teng, former editor of
the official People's Daily, Wu
Han, vice mayor of Peking, and
Liao Mo Sha, a member of the
Peking party committee. One ar-
ticle referred to "traitor Teng."
The latest issue of Peking Re-
view gave a fuller picture by
carrying the text of one of the
major articles published May 10
attacking the three.
The article said the Teng people
"pinned their hope on the seizure
of power in the party and govern-
ment by the antiparty, anti-
Socialist elements."

SEEK COMPROMISE:
Senate Avoids Figh

Johnson Predicts Successful
September Viet Nam Elections

WASHINGTON (/P)-Rival lead-
ers in the Senate battle over
supervision of the CIA agreed
yesterday to try to work out a
compromise and avoid an em-
barrassing floor fight,
After a close door meeting called
by Sen. Mike Mansfield (D-Mont),
in the role of mediator, they can-
celed a potentially bruising show-
down between some of the biggest
names in the Senate over who
should keep an eye on cloak-and-
dagger operations.
Mansfield expressed the hope
the dispute could be settled with-
out floor debate on "this most
sensistive subject."
Resolution
Chairman J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark), of the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee, had planned to
present to the Senate yesterday a

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WASHINGTON ) - President
Johnson predicted yesterday that
Viet Nam will achieve representa-
tive government and said there is
no reason to panic over that coun-
try-or the American legislative
program-just "because we have
some problems."
Johnson blended a Cabinet
meeting into a news conference
and wound up by taking a confi-
dent, encouraging view of most of
the globe.
He kept jumping back and forth
between domestic affairs, parti-
cularly congressional items, and
Viet Nam. Mixing them all to-
gether, he said the reports were
constructive and encouraging.
In starting off by reviewing
Asubjects that came up in the
Cabinet meeting, Johnson said he
was asking the Cabinet members
to stay on and report briefly to
the press or to answer questions.
But Johnson's own report, and
the questions and answers involv-
ing himself, ran on so long that
nobody else had a chance to get
into the performance.
In answer to whether he fore-
sees that Viet Nam can go ahead
with elections Sept. 11 in view
of internal turmoil, Johnson said,
"We realize the difficulties," and
we are working" very much
toward attaining a constitutional,
representative government and
"we believe that in time it is
attainable."
In discussing legislation in Con-

gress, he ticked off measures that
have gone through recently and
others that are well on the way
and summed up: "So we are mak-
ing solid progress right on down
the road."
Then, in a quick switch, he re-
verted to an earlier question and
said: "I feel about our legislative
program much like I feel about
John's question on Viet Nam. I
don't think we should panic be-
cause we have some problems.
"I think that you will find that
the historians will record that you
lived in a period when we made
greater progress in health, edu-
cation, conservation, and develop-
ment throughout the world than in
any similar period in history.
"Itnis a very exciting time to
live in."
The White House was asked af-
ter the conference to clarify a
complaint by Johnson that the
American press has failed to pro-
vide adequate coverage of South
Vietnamese political developments.
Johnson had said "I am en-
couraged by the progress the elec-
toral committee is making out
there-although I don't get to
follow its progress in the press as
fully and in depth as I would
like to."
In response to an Associated
Press letter asking for clarification
on this, a White House official
said that the President would have
nothing furtherdto say on the
subject, but added :

"What he referred to today
the day-to-day progress of
electoral committee."

was
the

esolution that in effect wou
ut three Foreign Relations mer
ers on the Senate's CIA watc
og panel.
The move was opposed by mer
ers of the seven-man CIA pan
nade up of senior members of t
rmed Service and Appropriatio
ommittees and headed by S
lichard B. Russell (D-Ga), chai
nan of the Armed Services Co
nittee.
But Mansfield, the Democra
enate leader, told newsmen th
had been agreed to put off t
ight because one member of t
IA panel, Sen. Carl Hayden (
riz) is in the hospital.
Compromise
Another reason, Mansfield sa
vas that "we are still trying
vork out a compromise soluti
n consultation with various i
erested senators."
Mansfield said he wasn't at<
ure this could be achieved. Ru
ell said last week after a meeti
ith the CIA watchdog group
as extremely doubtful a coi
romise could be worked out.
But, added Mansfield, "I a

vsRoundup
The much-revised, controversial
measure was approved 78-29 and
sent to the Senate for concur-
rence in House amendments.
The bill, which originally passed
the Senate early last year, was
described as "a cordial invitation
to Michigan's counties to accept
the opportunity to reorganize their
government," by Rep. Francis-Bee-
don (D-Muskegon), chairman of
the Towns and Counties Commit-
tee.
The area's newest Drive-in is
easy to locate . .. Just. 2 miles
south of Washtenw-on ar-
penter Rd.
SOX OFFICE OPEN 7:00

The official said the President
believes the progress of the elec-
toral project has received less
attention from the press than it
might have except for "distressing
incidents" which have provided
more spectacular headlines.

Siukarno's 'Cr
Campaign En
BANGKOK, Thailand (A>)-The
more than two-year campaign of
President Sukarno of Indonesia to
"crush Malaysia" collapsed yes-
terday, as the two nations signed
documents agreeing to settle the
dispute.
Over the objections of Sukarno,
Foreign Minister Adam Malik
journeyed to this Thai capital and
signed the agreement with Prime
Minister Tunku Abdul Razak of
Malaysia. While both governments
must ratify the agreement, there
was little doubt hostilities were at
an end.
A new civilian-military regime
has wrested authority from Su-
karno, now little more than a
figurehead, who set out shortly
after Malaysia was formed in 1963
to crush the federation. He called

DAILY OFFICIAL BULL

ousn miaaysia 's
wi
ids Peacefully j
it a creature of British colonialism
designed to strangle Indonesia.
The confrontation was one of
Sukarno's expensive policies that
the new regime in Jakarta was
anxious to end. Malik had said in
a speech recently the financial
and economic strain of the cam-
paign was to great for Indonesia
to bear.
Malik said that an immediate
end to confrontation could not be
possible because there are so many
technical aspects to be discussed.
But he and Razak agreed to
further contacts.
Among the aspects probably is
getting word to Indonesian guer-
rillas on Borneo, who have been
making hit-and-run attacks on
Sarawak and Sabah. Indonesian
infiltrators also have been landed
in Malaya from time to time.
ETIN
of duty in service, as engineering of-
ficer. Design maintenance systems that
will provide maximum utilization of
the mill's complex and highly auto-
mated equipment.
United Fruit Co., Boston, Mass. -
Planning Associate, MBA with heavy
concentration in advanced math, prob-
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Some business exper. in corporate eco-
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For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
WHAT'S AN
ADLER J-4?
Keep watching
for answer

.T y " . li .,. ,

, 4
to
on
in-
all
is-
ng
it
m-
ain

The resolution approved by the
Foreign Relations Committee and
drafted by Sen. Eugene J. Mc-
Carthy (D-Minn) would establish
a nine-member Senate Committee
on Intelligence Operations.
The panel would be composed
of three members each from the
Foreign Relations, the Armed
Services and the Appropriations
Committees.
ENDING TONIGHT
Show Starts at 7:30
Feature at 7:45
D TO ANNOUNCE THE RETURN OF
,s Daily
:30
at 1:45)
T:30
at 7:45)
)AY
ONS RETURN
"Irma La Douce"

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DIAL 8-641t6

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Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
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THURSDAY, JUNE 2
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"How to Plan, Install, Conduct,
and Measure Management Training":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - George Bernard Shaw's
"Misalliance": Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
Ceneral Notices
Admission Test for Graduate Study in
Business: Application blanks are avail-
able in Room 122 Rackham Bldg. for!
the Admission Test for Graduate Study
in Business, The next administration of
the test will be on Bat., July 9, and
applications must be received in Prince-
ton, N.J., by June 25.,
Doctoral Examination for Paul
Woodson Davis, Pharmacology; thesis:
"Inhibition of Sodium-Potassium-Acti-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THiS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENVS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 BAB.
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, June 2, 7:30 p.m., 3545
AB.
Hillel Graduate Student Council, Pic-
nic, Sun., June 5, 2 p.m., Island Park.
Newman Student Association, Com-

vated Adenosinetriphonphatase Activi- ye
ty In Rat Brain by Substituted Pheno- int
thiazines," Thurs., June 2, 6314 Medi- ha
cal Science Bldg., at 10 a.m. Chair- sp
man, T. M. Brody.I
Doctoral Examination for Esther Fai- Y
Wan Su, Biological Chemistry; thesis: or
"Studies on Arylhydrazine Oxidase and lit
on the Biosynthesis of Azetidine-2- ed
Carboxylic Acid in Plants," Thurs", en
June 2, 5243kMedical Science Bldg.,
at 10 a.m. Chairman, Bruce Levenberg. t14
________org
tioc
Doctoral Examination for Charles tro
Isaac Smith, Geology; thesis: "Physi- e14
cal Stratigraphy and Faces Analysis,t
Lower Cretaceous Formations, North-
ern Coahuila, Mexico," Thurs., June 2, F
2051 Nat. Science Bldg., at 9 a.m._-
Chairman, L. B. Kellum. De
wi
En
Placement pl
POSITION OPENINGS: coa
* dar
Oakite Products, Inc.--Sales repre- tic
sentative in the Detroit area. Six C
weeks training in New York, guaran- pe
teed income during early coverage of No
the territory, commission arrangement mn
later. Prefer men out of school a few yo
t--

eare with some business experience,
aterested especially in someone who
s engaged in athletics or taught
ports at high school level.
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co.,
oungstown, Ohio-Research Librarian,
ganize library, supervise clerical help,
terature search function. Experienc-
d, masters in Lib. Sci., bkgd. in sci-
nce or engineering.
Genesee County Tuberculosis Associa-
rn, Flint, Mich.-Program consultant,
rganize programs for the intensif ca-
on of tuberculosis control and con-
.o of other respiratory diseases. Bach-
tors in Health, Ed. or related areas,
wo or more years in a voluntary or
ublic health agency.
Ford Motor Co., Mt. Clemens, Mich.
Chemical Products Plant, Product
evelopment Dept. seeks recent grads
th degrees in Chemistry or Chemical
ngineering. Research, development of
lstic, vinyl, using Polymeric films,
atings, color instrumentation calen-
ring, extrusions, laminations, solu-
on coatings and printing processes.
Chase Brass and Copper Co., Mont-
lier, Ohio-Project Engineer in new
orthwest Ohio brass rod mill, equip-
tnt oriented bkgd. Interested in
sung engineer who has completed tour

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