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May 26, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MAY 26. 1966

NEXT WEEK:

.DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI N
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Shaw 's 'Misalliance

To Be Presented

George Bernard Shaw was a
man seen through many eyes.
And well he might be, for the+
famous English dramatist (1856-
1950) wore a great many robes in
his long lifetime.
The dark suited Shaw, as seen
by his friend Sir Max Beerbohm,
reflects the scathing dramatic
critic who shocked turn of the
century London with the herald-
ing of Ibsen, the mocking dismis-
sal of contemporary English au-"
thors and, of course, the birth of
his own stunning dramas. The
eyes blaze with wit and perhaps
a little of the fervor he displayed
as a political orator.
The eyes of political cartoonist
David Low's Shaw are those of
the comic dramatist. This is the
man who revelled in the high jinks
of plays like "Arms and the Man."
The wicked glint beneath the
brows of the rogue in the smoking
jacket testify to another facet of
his dramatic ability. This is the
Shaw who saw through so many
social, political and moral pre-
tensions and gracefully demolish-
ed them with the wit that always
accompanied him and his work.
It is difficult to pinpoint what
connotions the drawing from
"Punch" of the satirical satyr
Shaw bring to mind. Perhaps this
comes closest to capturing the
essence of the man's spirit and
talent. He was free, more than an
ordinary man, shocking whenever
he could be. The language of his
plays, from his first farces to the
high comedy of "St. Joan," is one
of the greatest triumphs of the
English speaking stage.

ers, was written in 1910 and is a
rare blending of all Shaw's talents.
George Jean Nathan, one of
America's greatest drama critics,
said of it, "It has more wit, humor
and vibrancy than nine-tenths of
the plays we see."
Prof. William McGraw of the
University speech department,
who is currently directing the Uni-
versity Players production finds
it a classic example of British
comedy, joining Shaw's imagina-
tive sense of fun with his typically
adroit philosophizing.
This opening production of the
University Summer Playbill will
be June 1-4 in the air-conditioned
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
As Shaw was seen in a great
many guises, he in turn saw deep-
ly into the human heart. "Misal-
liance" deals comically, but sen-
sitively, with the complex relation-
ships within a rather unique Brit-
ish family, complicated by the ar-
rival of Lina Szczepanowska, who
quite literally "drops in" when she
crashes her airplane through the
green house roof.
Lina is one of Shaw's most de-
lightful heroines, almost as out-
spoken and multi-faceted as her
creator. It is her wit, aided sub-
stantially by her womanly wiles,
that resolves the proposed misal-
liance that gives the play its
name.
Most Shaw plots are indescrib-
able. Their joy lies in seeing them
spun out on a stage. Suffice it to
say that "Misalliance" is fast and
funny, witty and warmhearted.
Tickets for "Misalliance" and
for the entire Summer Playbill
are available this week at thy?

SHAW, as seen by Massaguer

SHAW, as seen by Punch's A.W.L.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an L
official publication of the Univer- r
sity of Michigan for which The t
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be I
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day 9
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are nota
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, MAY 26
Day Calendar
Electron Physics Laboratory Program
Review Meeting-Registration, RackhamI
Lobby, 8 a.m.
Conference on the Initial Managementt
of the Acutely Il or Injured Patient--I
Registration, Rackham Lobby, 8 a.m. f
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-r
inar - "How to Recruit Experienced
Executive Personnel": Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m.f
Student Laboratory Theatre - An-t
nounces its 14th production of thef
1965-66 season consisting of a bill ofe
three plays: Camus' "Caligula, Sartre'sP
"The Devil and the Good Lord" andf
lonesco's "The Leader." The time is
4:10 p.m. in the Arena Theatre, FriezeZ
Bldg., Thurs., May 26. The admissionr
is free.I
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Thurs., June 23.c
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Thurs., ,June 9. t
Doctoral Examination for David Ar-
thur Cunningham, Education; thesis:
'The Effect of Training on the Aero-
bic and Anaerobic Capacities," Thurs.,
May 26, PEM Bldg., Conf. Room, at 2
p.m. Chairman, J. A. Faulkner.
Counseling for the Dearborn Campus:
Will continue to be available in Room
2503 Administration Bldg. during the
first half of the Spring-Summer Term
(May-June). Freshman and sophomore
students interested in a senior college
internship program in business admin-
istration, senior college liberal arts
program and teacher certification may
call 764-0301 for an appointment with
a counselor.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
Graduate Study during the 1967-68
academic year are now available. Coun-
tries in which study grants are of-
fered are Afghanistan, Argentina, Aus-
tralia, Austria, Belgium-Luxembourg,
BoliiacBrazil, Ceylon, Chile, China
(Republic of), Colombia, Costa Rica,
Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fin-
land, France, Germany (Federal Repub-
lic of), Greece, Guatemala, Honduras,
Iceland. India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Ja-
maica, Japan. Korea, Malaysia, Mexico,
Nepal, The Netherlands, New Zealand,
Nicaragua, Norway, Pldistan, Para-
guay, Peru, the Philippines, Poland,
Portugal, Rumania. Spain, Sweden,
Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Repub-
lic, the United Kingdom, Uruguay, Ven-
ezuela and Yugoslavia. The grants are
made for one academic year and in-
clude round-trip transportation, tui-
tion, a living allowance and a small
stipend for books and equipment. All
grants are made in foreign currencies.
Interested students who are U.S. citi-
zens and hold an A.B. degree,or who
will receive such a degree by May,
1967, and who are presently enrolled in
the University of Michigan, should re-
quest application forms for aFulbright
award at the Graduate I ellowship Of-
fice, Room 110 Rackham Bldg. The
closing date for receipt of applications
is Oct. 17, 1966.
Persons not enrolled in a college or
Ph. 483-4680
tnntuvN CARPENTER ROAD

university should direct inquiries and
requests for applications to the Insti-
tute of International Education, U.S.
Student Program, 809 United Nations
Plaza, New York, N.Y., 10017.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Assignments to the Trust
Territory of Micronesia Pacific Islands:
Special abbreviated application form
and no placement test make you avail-
able for this special program. Fill out
shorter forms available at the Bureau
and be notified within 15 days, by
phone, of your acceptance. College
grads in any field, especially liberal
arts, for Elementary ed., Public. Health
and Public works projects.
POSITION OPENINGS:,
Samuel L. Winternitz Co.-Two posi-
tions, one in Detroit, other in Chicago.
Executive Secretaries; light bookkeep-
ing and shorthand, BA and field, some
business exper. helpful, under 35. Com-
mercial auctioneering firm.
CTS Corp., Manufacturer of Electron-
ic Components, Elkhart, Ind.-Manu-
facturer of micro-electronic modules
and hybrid circuits seeks men to
perform materials research in the thick
film micro-electronic field. Chemical
engineers, chemists, and physicists.
Either recent grads or people having
from one to 10 years experience. ,
Ayerst Laboratories, Inc., Rouses Pt.,
N.Y.-BS and some experience mini-
mum for the following .positions: 1.
Export technical supervisor. 2. Deten-
tion technical supervisor. 3. Technician.
4. Administrative assistant in account-
ing. 5. Technical librarian. 6. Assistant
manager quality control lab. 7. Quality
control chemist. 8. Formulations phar-
macist.
State of Connecticut-Welfare Inves-
tigator classes 1 and 2. Seniors or re-

cent grads are invited to take an
examination (application deadline June
1, for dates June 25, July 9, and 16)
for position involved with investiga-
tions and services of Public Assistance
eligibility or Child Welfare. Degree and
0-1 years experience.
Management Consultants, New York
Area-Manager of information systems,
for technical and engineering .disci-
plines. Degree in engrg., phys., or
math. Some successful management ex-
per, in same area.
. Agency, New oYrk-Vocational Re-
habilitation Counselor Placement Spe-
cialist. Masters in some Vocational
Rehabilitation counseling curriculum
and related experience and ability to
qualify for the state exam in this
area. Bachelor's and 3 years exper., some
with physically or mentally disabled
persons can substitute. Immediate
opening.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
ORGAN IZATION"
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENVS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
. * S
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Sab-
bath service, John. Planer, cantor, Fri.,
May 27, 7:15 p.m., William Present
Chapel.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity supper & mass, May 27, 5 p.m.,
331 Thompson.

Have a Free Coffee (Iced Tea)
Break With Us!
INTERNATIONAL CENTER

:-

THURSDAY, MAY 26th:

4 to 5:30

You may be a star in a movie, too.

~ -
IFidayMay 27

6:30 P.M.

SHAW, as seen by Max Beerbohm

SHAW, as seen by David Low

"MINKAMPF"
the dinner-film series
of the Ecumenical Campus Ministry
at
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw $1.25 (dinner & film)

SS.

WAR OF THE WORLDS?:
When Other Worlds Are Met,
Will We Start Fighting Them

Please make din

nner reservations-662-3580

SHAW, as seen
WARD'S SURVEY-
Report Wide
DETROIT ()-An auto industry
trade publication reported last
night that car makers have cut
100,000 units from production
schedules for the three-month-
period ending July 31.
Ward's Automotive Reports said
the production cutback is in ad-'
dition to an estimated 175,0001
units it said were slashed from
production schedules two weeks
ago.
The report came at the same
time that American Motors Corp.
announced it was suspending as-
sembly operations Wednesday be-
cause of a lack of universal joints.
It said it was idling 13,000 hourly
workers at Milwaukee, and Keno-
sha, Wis., because of lack of the
components from a Dana Corp.
piant in Marion, Ind., which was
struck Monday.
AMC said 4,000 workers would
remain on other jobs.
Ward's did not break down the
reported 100,000-unit cutback by
company.
General Motors Corp. said it had
not changed its position since

ANAHEIM, Calif. )-JuSt sup-'
pose, as a political scientist sup-
posed yesterday, that space travel
leads to meeting intelligent beings
from or on another planet.
Would earthlings unite or wage
uinterstellar war? Would we have
to kowtow to a more advanced
n by a camera civilization, or dominate an "in-
ferior" one? Suppose they had no
more, or even less, feelings of love
and responsibility? Might meeting
with an advanced society push
A ut Cutback an further toward "creating a
AutoCutb ek~utureof frantic fun"?
The speculations come from
early May on production sched- Prof, Harold D. Lasswell of law
ules for the remainder of its 1966 and political science at Yale Uni-
model run. versity, in a paper presented to
A Ford Motor Co. spokesman the American Astronomical So-
declined to state the firm's pro- A nciety.
duction plans beyond this week. Ma m aoWar?
Chrysler Corp. reiterated its thran might a b caindon war
statement of plans to close as- through meetillg a civilization
sembly plants at Newark, Del., and
Los Angeles for four days next
week.
Ward's said its latest projection
includes the loss of 13,000 Mus-
tangs because of a strike at Ford's
Metuchen, N.J., plant.
Ward's estimated car output this'
month at 800,000 units, second
only to the record 837,166 built in
May 1965.
It said June production would
be "robust" despite the reported

more advanced
technologically
well said.

In that case, also, he said, "it
is conceivable that man's civiliza-
tion will intensify the predisposi-
tion already visible toward creat-
ing a culture of frantic fun, whose
chief thrust will be toward in-'
tense participation in the immed-
iate-in music and the dance, in
affection and drama, in gambling
and in sport."
"Besides frantic fun there may
be a strand of emphasis on serene
repose, on meditation and with-
drawal from immediate participa-
tion with others." he added.
Subjugation?
Beings from another planet
might treat humans as industrial-
ized man has treated primitive

scientifically andI
than ours, Lass-I

societies on earth, he said. They
might try to destroy or subjugate
the earth, or might help nations
on earth unite peaceably,
There are no persuasive grounds
for asserting that a higher form
of civilization will have greater
"aesthetic sensibilities exhibited
in art creation or criticism than
we have; or a keener sense of re-
sponsibility for giving deference
to the thoughts or feelings of
others," Lasswell said.
"It is not necessary, either, that
love occupies a significant place
in the lives of the new society."
If the other civilization was
peaceful, he said, nations of this

planet might intensify their
race. Each might try to be
to put the technology of
strangers to military use.

arms
first
the

NOW SHOWING
COME SPY1YITH YOUR FAVORITE
INTWO SM-BANGc
ADVENTURES 1
OBER9TSENTA ROBERT DAV)
VAUGHN BERGER VAUGHN-McCALLUM
DAVID McCALLUM gUcIAfA PAIUZ
Shown at Shown at
8:25-12 10:20 Only
ALSO-
"BEAU-JEST"-In Color
Unbelievable Accuracy
In Championship Archery
2 COLOR CARTOONS
BIG FIREWORKS
DISPLAY SUNDAY, 9 P.M.

- -
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR:
/ l
BILLY WILDER
1 ..
1
1 1
1* 1
(1954)
A Marvelous and Romantic Fling
by one of Hollywood's ablest directors.
1 . ;
I Starring
HUMPHREY BOGART, AUDREY HEPBURN
and WILLIAM HOLDEN
1
SHORT: "CLAY"
/ l
1
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMInSSON: FITY CENTS
U* wrrmn wrIrwnrrrrrrO~wwrr"'M

4

I

I

TODAY 4:10 P.M.
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Bldg.
CAMUS' CALIGULA
SATRE'S THE DEVIL AND
THE GOOD LORD
IONESCO'S THE LEADER
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
Department of Speech
ADMISSION FREE

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

production cIt back.
The new cutback, it said, "does
not- include all four major auto
makers,"
The industry's inventory of un-
sold new cars hit a record 1.6
million units this month, and
Ward's said auto makers are
keeping a close eye on the new-
car inventory trend,"

For KlUL I
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

1I

U

TODAY
THRU
SATURDAY

DIAL 8-6416
When that madl
from Rio and
that woman from France
meet that man from
Goldfinger...the sparks fly in a
delightful adventure in Suspense!
rFANME MOPEAU

Shows
-Today
at 7 & 9 P.M.

ENDS TONIGHT
COLUMBIA 4
PICTURES
presents+
Rosalind Hayley
Russell Mills

r~~jl tgluesaRid, Notwith gGrct1
Frank! o
AND
Johnny
were lovers...
and you'll
loVe every
minute
of it!
{ ~ iTlr

I

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i

I

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