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February 10, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAFLY

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JOHN HEATH-STUBBS:

RUBAIIYAT

Visiting English Poet Returns To London

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4

By ANDREW HAWLEY
John Heath-Stubbs, a young
British poet who has published
several books of verse and criti-
cism, left the University last week
to return to London after two se-
mesters as a visiting lecturer in
English literature.
He has not decided what he will
do, but he wants to stay in Lon-
don, where he would like to find
"some kind of editing job."
In addition to his year at the
University, Heath-Stubbs taught
English in Alexandria, Egypt, from
1955 to 58. He also visited Mexizo
last summer.
However, he finds that "traveling
has no direct effect on my poetry.
I am too much of an introvert to
write directly about things I've
observed."
Two Poems
For example, Heath-Stubbs
wrote two poems about Alexandria
-one before he went there and
one afterwards. "No one could telll
the difference between what I had

written before I ever saw Egypt Heath-Stubbs is "not happy" 'to students in English 31, to receive
and the poem written after I had about teaching modern poetry as papers including careful, detailed
been there three years." an academic subject. "Students 'quotations and bibliographies, but
On the other hand, he feels that should be left to read what Is he thinks this kind of traininig is
"living in different places widens contemporary for. themselves," he "an excellent thing"
one's sensibility to the human con- said.One problem in trying to teach
dition-the poverty and misery contemporary literature arises be-
under which people live must have At Oxford, literature after 1840 cause there is little agreement on
a moral effect." was not taught, he said, but the the comparative values of the work
students read it on their own and
Enjoys Stay discussed it among themselves. being produced today. "It is diffi-
Heath-Stubbs enjoyed his stay "The teachers didn't read it or cult to muster a set of great
in Ann Arbor, especially the fall care for it." Even the Victorians names," he pointed out.
semester, during which he "made were optional. No Controversy
more friends and was much hap- At the University, Heath-Stubbs But at the same time "there is
pier." But he probably will not taught a course in major English no violent controversy about con-
seek another teaching post.maoEnls temporary poets, as there was in
authors of the modern. period, the 1920's," he said.
"Tecahing literature analytically an introductory course in the short Heat92u's is alm
seems to destroy my creative ima- story and poetry and one in neo- Heath-Stubbs is "alarmed" by
gination," he said. "I hope it didn't classics. the number of brilliant American
do the same to my students." "Depressing" writers who have been enormously
"Some take the extreme view- popular and then have fizzled out
that literature ought not to be He was told that students will in the last 15 years.
taught at all. In an ideal society not read the material unless it is He finds fault with the meth-
taugtit all.e nnr Ideal soiy assigned in a course," and he finds ods of modern journalism: "young
it would be unnecessary. The only hi"dpesn.wrtsca't bear the weight. of
conceivable way would be for poets uP "depressing. writers can
to teach other poets their techni- On the other hand, Heath-Stubbs publicity," he said. oFr example,
cal skills," he added. considers American literary re- in London, two Sunday papers

DAILY BUSINESSMEN'S- BUFFET LUNCHEON $1.45
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University Student Protests
Southern Poice Harassment

i

(Continued from Page 1)

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county, Along with three students
from the University of Texas, we
had visited the "Tent City," which
was set up in Fayette county to
house displaced Negro tenant
farmers.
When we returned to Somerville,
the county seat of Fayette, we
entered a restaurant. Before our
food was served, the local police
entered and questioned us for an
hour and a half. They warned us
that since strangers weren't wel-
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would be best for us to stay out.
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TONIGHT
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grew. The sheriff assured us that
there would be no trouble. The
state police also arrived. We were
able to drive away without fur-
ther incident.
In the South, little is needed
to provoge intimidation by the
white citizens. In Fayette and
Haywood counties seemingly in-
significant matters are enough to
trigger harassment by townspeople
and law enforcement officials.
Northern license plates, boxes of
food or clothing or association
with members of the Negro com-
munity -however little -subject
you to intimidation.
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people, as did the judge, will at-
tempt to convey the impression
that there is no need, that the
Negroes are being provided for,
this was not my impression.
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ds pathetic. For most, the tents
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superior to the housing they, had
before.
In Nashville, I found that the
average income for a Negro fam-
ily in Fayette is only $706 a year.
The average years of education
total less than seven.
The government is testing the
ability of the landlords in Fay-
ette county to dispossess their
tenants for other than economic
reasons in a court case that will
be tried on Feb. 20 in the district
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