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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 27, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

uAA Playoffs Begin Tomorrow

Dayton Frosh Denies
Scandal Implication

0------ >

By BRIAN MacCLOWRY
'our of the nation's best college
eball teams open their bid for
Iwestern baseball supremacy to-
rrow when they meet in the
t -round of the NCAA District
ir playoffs at Ferry Field.
'or the winner of the double
nination affair, the reward'will
a trip to the college world series'
Omaha, June 9-14..
vidently none of the coaches is
king past tomorrow, however,
ause each is going with his best.
n the 1 p.m. opener, Mid-
erica Conference champion
stern Michigan will send ace
Playoff Tickets
Tickets for the NCAA base-
all playoffs will go on sale to-
iorrow at 12 noon, and can be
irchased at the booth on State
treet, between the Athletic Ad-
inistration Building and Yost
ledhouse, before entering ser-
r Field. Tickets are priced at
1.50 for general admission and
5 cents for students. There will
e no advance sale.
thander Bill. Orlieb: (8-0)
ainst the University of Detroit's
Dave Debusschere.
Joyce To Pitch
!nd in the second game,, start-
20minutes after the end of the
it, Big Ten champion Michigan
1 pin its hopes on sophomore
se Joyce (8-2), who will be op-
sng Missouri. Valley winner Ci-
atti, and'flame-throwing right-
nder Bill Faul (7-0).
k team will have to be beaten
ce to be eliminated from the
irnament. On Tuesday, tomor-
v's losers will play the first game
I the winners the second.
t'he Wednesday opener, will
tch the winner of Tuesday's
t game with the loser of the
ond, with the beaten team being
minated. This will leave one un-
ten team to fight it out with
% once-beaten winner of Wed-
iday's first game.
Gin or lose tomorrow, Michigan.
ach Don Lund will come back
Tuesday with southpaw Fritz
her (6-1), who hurled a one-
ter in his last regular season

start against Illinois. If the Wol-
verines are still in the thick of it
on Wednesday, Lund will probably
use either senior lefthander Bob
Marcereau (2-0) - or come back
with Joyce.
Joyce has been Lund's "first
game" pitcher all year, and' al-
though Fisher looked sharper in
the Illinois doubleheader last
weekend, the Wolverine mentor
will continue to follow the pattern
that brought Michigan its first Big
Ten baseball title since 1953.
Joyce finished with a 5-1 mark
in conference play, and needed re-
lief in only one of his five starts.
That was last Saturday against
Illinois when he lost his only Big
Ten decision, 4-1. He, won one
game in relief against Michigan
State.
By being paired with Cincinatti
in the first game, Michigan will
avoid meeting either of the teams
that have accounted for three' of
the Wolverines nine lossesonthe
season.
Beat 'M' Twice
Detroit has whipped Michigan
twice, 3-2 and 8-7, overcoming a
7-0 lead in the second game. Last
Tuesday, Western bested the Wol-
verines 7-5 after having an earlier
game rained out.
For Cincinatti it will be the sec-
ond playoff series of the season.
Earlier, the Bearcats shut out
Tulsa twice for the Missouri Val-
ley conference championship. In
the first game, which took only
one hourand 39 minutes to play,
Carl. Bouldin pitched a four-hitter
to give the Bearcats a 1-0 victory.
Whiffs 12
In the seven inning second game,
Faul struck out 12 and pitched an,
other four-hitter as Cincinatti won
2-0.
Detroit goes into the playoffs
with the best seasonal record of
any team. The Titans have won 18
games this year while dropping
only one.
Michigan will be spurred by the,
return to action of catcher Bill
Freehan. Freehan sat out the last
five innings of the Western Michi-
gan game after being spiked on
the left arm, a wound that almost
brought tears to the eyes of the
20 some-odd'major league scouts
bidding for his services.

-Daily-David Giltrow
A CLOUD OF DUST-The NCAA Championship hopes of three
teams will go up in a cloud of dust this week as Michigan, West-
ern Michigan, Detroit; and Cincinnati square off for a double
elimination playoff series beginning Monday at Ferry Field. The
Wolverine player shown is shortstop Dick Honig.
SPORT SHORTS:
Boston Breaks Record;
Villanova Takes IC4A

DAYTON, O. (P)-A University
of Dayton freshman ball player,
named as an "intermediary" in
the college basketball scandals,
said yesterday he positively did not
take $250 from a man accused of
fixing games, but admitted he did
take smaller amounts.
The player, Roger Brown of
Brooklyn, N.Y., made the com-
ments in an exclusive interview
with Si Burick, sports editor of
the Dayton Daily News.
Earlier, the university announc-
ed that it was not taking any ac-
tion against Brown because it
lacked official notification from
the New York district attorney's
office as to his part in the scan-
daih. The university said Brown
will continue in "good standing
among his fellow students."
Brown was one of 12 players
named Wednesday when the New
York grand jury returned an in-
dictment against Joseph Hacken
of New York, involving him in
fixing basketball games. None of
the 12 players was indicted, how-
ever.
Brown, who has not played var-
sity ball for the Flyers but would
be eligible next season, was named
in the indictment as an "inter-
mediary." He was said to have
accepted $250 for his "good of-
fices."
Yesterday, in the interview with
Burick, he denied being involved
in any basketball fixes..
"I never took any money for
an introduction or to ask any-
body to do anything wrong on
the basketball floor," he said.
That was his reply to a ques-
tion on whether any funds, aside
from eating and gasoline money,
were ever given to him.
He was asked if he ever took
smaller amounts that could add up.
to $250, and he answered :
"I don't see how. They bought
me a meal now and then, and gave
me gasoline money and sometimes

I took a friend along to eat or
maybe I had a date who was in-
vited along."
He did not identify the "they"
who did these things for him.
"Once in a while," he went on,
"maybe I'd go out to eat and have
a date with me. They'd pick up
the check and ask if I wanted to
see a show, or go somewhere.
Then they'd give me a couple of
dollars."
Did he consider this irregular?
Burick asked.
"No," Brown said, "that even
happened in high school before I
ever knew these people. People
who were interested in us and
happy we won a game would give
us a little money to have a good
time on."
Untouchables
Beat Evans

BICYCLE
STORAGE

$1.50 per month
" INDOOR STORAGE

for Air and Ship Reservations
to EUROPE and all points in the U.S.
Available any date.
Call TRAVEL BUREAU, INC.
NO 5-9151

MODESTO, Calif. UIP)-Olympic
and World Champion Ralph Bos-
ton last night became the first
man ever to broad jump past the
27 foot mark.
The collegian from Tennessee
A&I leaped 27 feet 1/ inch at the
California Relays to break his own
world record of 26 feet 11% inches.
Before Boston set that record
last year, the 26 foot 81/ record
had stood since Jesse Owens set it
back in 1935.
Villanova Takes Five
NEW YORK (WP)-Powerful Vil-
lanova won five events-two of
them by Frank Budd-and swept
to an easy victory in the IC4A
Track and Field Championship
yesterday with 46 points.
Budd, co-holder of the world
100-yard record (9.3) and prob-
ably the finest sprinter ever pro-
duced in the east, won the 100 in
9.6 and the 220-yard dash in 21.4.

rado State College a 16-12 vic-
tory over Wyoming yesterday and
send the NCAA District 7 Base-
ball Playoffs into a clinching
game today.
Suydan's grandslam homer came
in the bottom of the eighth.
The victorious Bears have suf-
fered one loss in the double-elim-
ination playoffs. Wyoming was
unbeaten.

Clutch hitting by Bob- SchneiderPR T C ON F O ,TH T
and courageous pitching by Don * PROTECT ION FROM THEFT
Nast enabled the Untouchables to and DAMAGE
defeat. Evans Scholars 1-0 for the a dQ M G
independent softball league cham-
pionship. " REPAIRING, IF DESIRED
In' the last of the eighth inning
Bob Schneider singled home Terry
Feethum who had gotten on base
on an error and had advanced to Truck pick-up $1.00 extra, less in groups
second on at bunt. This was Schnei-
der's second hit of the game and
only the third off the Evans NO 2-0035
pitcher.
Always cool under fire, Nast
pitched a strong game for the Un-
touchables and was aided by four
double plays executed by the slick
fielding Untouchables. c
If Evans Scholars would have cBIKE & TOY
won the game they would have
captured the overall Independent 514 E. William St. - near Maynard - NO 2-0035
League I-M championship by four
points.
FEWNER GLASS & PAINT CO.
216 W. William'Street Ann Arbor, Michigan:
Telephone NO 8-8014

5 Outstanding 'M' Athletes
.eceive Yost H onor Awards

By JIM BERGER
[wenty-five Micpigan student
7letes were recently recipients
the Yost Honor ,Award.
[he award, initiated.in 1940,
nmemorated Fielding H. Yost's
tieth. year of service to the
iversity. Since then the award
s been given annually.
n order to be a recipient, the
.dent must be either a junior or
dor, who has completed not
s than five semesters of under-
,duate work or its equivalent.
High Requirements
n the words of the original se-
tion committee, "those. selected
students who were outstand-
for their moral character and
)d fellowship, scholastic ability,
;ellectual 'capacity and achieve-
nt, physical ability and vigor,
dwho showed real capacity and
)mise of leadership and suc-

' Colorado State Wins
Thomas N. Osterland, Thomas A. LARAMIE, Wyo. (A')-Shortstop
Robinson, Gerald Smith, William Al Suydan slammed a home run
R. Stine, Eugene F. Struczewski, with the bases loaded to give Cobl-
and Richard S. Youngberg.
The winners for the year 1960-
61 were: Blaker, Joseph B. Bre-
feld, James R. Brown, Ronald L.
Clark, Donald B. Corriere, Wil-
liam T. Darnton, Fitzgerald, Gil
landers, Ergas Leps, Joseph E. P-
Lunghamer, Lorne D. MacDonald,
Martin, Montpetit, Osterland, Rob- G. CUR,
inson, Walter E. Schafer, Jon B. U S. 23
Schopf, Smith, Stine, John W.
Tidwell, and Youngberg.

NOW at LUMBARDS
1225 South University
World 's Largest Selection of
PAPERBACKS and POCKET BOOKS
in a DRUG STORE..
Come in and look 'em over

We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors andFurnture Tops
We Have the Nationally Advertised Paints
AlSO, we have complete glass service for foreign cars
Free Parking in Front of Our Store
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 75 YEARS

I

Last year due to lack of finan-
;al means, there was, no awards
anquet. However, this year ath-
etes for both 1959-60 and 1960-
1 were honored, with many of
hem repeating in 1960-61.
The 1959-60 winners were:
raines R. Blaker, Jared L. Bush-
ing, John A. Everhardus, Joseph
). Fitzgerald, J. David Gillanders,
3avid M. Martin, Jr., Richard
Kontpetit, Bernard L. Nielson,
COLLEGE MEN
EARN $2000
THIS SUMMER!
Largest company of its kind has
several interesting job opportuni-
ties for personable college men in
following areas:
1. "DETROIT
2. GRAND RAPIDS
3. SAGI NAWV
4. Michigan resort areas
5. Several summer European
assignments
No experience necessary but you
must be neat appearing and enjoy
meeting people. No car necessary.
Participaton in our Summer Earn-
ing Program will provide weekly
paychecks over $100 and also en-
title you to compete for the fol-
lowing awards:
1. $2000 cash scholarship to
school of your choice.'
2. Several $1000 cash schol-
arships.
3. To win one of several
AROUND THE WORLD

S If you have Used Books
EtoSell-Read This!
As the Semester end approaches - bringingwith it a period of heavy book selling by students - ULRICH'S
would like to review with you their BOOK BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fail into several categories, each of which - because of the law of supply and demand - has
its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS 1.
A textbook of current copyrights-used on our campus-and which the Teaching Department involved has
approved for re-use next semester--has the highest market value. If ULRICH'S needs copies of this book we will
offer 50% of the list price for copies in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock of a title for the
coming semester, ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained later in this article. (THIS
IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE.)
CLASS II.
Some of the above Class I books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose pages or other physical de-
fects. These will be priced down according to the estimated cost of repair.

i, r t,

-
!You're needed.'just as your father and grand'
(father were. It's an obligation that a lot of qualified
college men have to meet...that of serving your counj
try, when and where you are needed.
And the Air Force needs college-trained men as
officers. This is caused by the rapidly expanding tech.J
nology that goes with hypersonic air and space flight.
Your four years of college have equipped you to han.
dIe complex jobs. Youhave the potential to profit
from advanced training... then put it to work.
There are several ways to become an officer.
First there is Air Force ROTC. Another program;
,relatively .new, is Officer Training School. Here the
Air Force commissions certain college graduates, both
men and women, after three months' training. The
navigator' training program enables you to win a'
flying rating and a commission. And, of course, there's
[the Air Force Academy.
An Air Force officer's starting salary averages out
to about what you could expect as a civilian. First
there's your base pay. Then add on such things as
tax-free rations and quarters allowances, free medical,
and dental care, retirement provision, perhaps flight]
pay, and 30 days' vacation per year. It comes to an
attractive figure. One thing more. As an officer, you
will become eligible for the Air Force Institute of
Technology. While on active duty many officers will
win graduate degrees at Air Force expense.
Why not contact your local Air Force Recruiter:
Or write to Officer Career Information, Dept.:
SC15, Box 7608, Washington 4, D.C., if you
want further information about the navigator
training or Officer Training School programs.,

CLASS 111.

i

Each semester various professors decide to change texts for a given course. These decisions on change of
textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY far above the level of your local book retailers,.
AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (QUITE OFTEN WE HAVE MANY COPIES OF THE OLD TITLE
OF WHICH YOU HAVE ONLY ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S DO enter the picture with our WHOLESALE connections. Somewhere there may be a
professor who will adopt a cast-off book from Michigan. WHOLESALE BOOK JOBBERS take a gamble on this and
offer to buy our over-stock and yours.
If the dropped title is a current edition, and from a well known publisher, the Jobber offer to us is usually,
25% of list. AS A SERVICE TO YOU, ULRICH'S WILL BUY THESE DROPPED TITLES FOR WHAT THE JOBBER
OFFERS.
CLASS IV.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new editions. When we "get caught" with an old edition, let's
accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the shelf as a reference book or sell it
cheap for a bargain reference book,

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