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May 21, 1961 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNAY, '1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,)

's
Y Y l w

Profile: Dan Rosmergy

which took him from social rep-
resentative on his corridor to the
glittering heights of IQC's first
presidency, really began 21 years
ago in the Copper County of up-
per Michigan, where Dan was
born in the city of Laurium.
Impressed by Beauty
Deeply impressed by the beauty
and people of this area, Dan will
readily speak of it in glowing
terms for long periods of time.
The people back there were im-
pressed with Dan, too, and want
him to run for the state Legisla-
ture after he graduates next
month.
Dan is considering a career of
professional politics, but is not
ready to commence: one now. In
planning for next year, Dan will
choose among law school, the
Navy Officer Candidate School
and graduate work in administra-
tion and staff personnel.
He' will earn a teacher's certifi-
cate with his diploma and a ma-
jor in history..
Unusual Moment
Perhaps the most unusual mo-
ment of his year as IQC chief
was the night Dan spoke before
the mass rush meeting and strong-
ly encouraged all the men to rush
fraternities. He feels each man
should make his own decision aft-
er examining all the different
types of living units.
"I never went through formal
rush myself," he recalls,, "but
through informal rush and house
dinners and parties, I have many
friends in the system."
Don believes that both systems,'
the quads and the fraternities,
have "much to offer." He rates the
residence halls higher in his mind
because they have a more diverse
population, conditions more con-
ducive to study. and more inde-
pendence for the individual.
He also has a distinct aversion
towards the ordeals of 'Hell Week'
pledging and refers to it as "cow-
towing," though he recognizes a
diminishing of such activities on
the fraternity scene.
'General Code'
He favors, however, the tapping
and initiation ceremonies of the
men's honoraries "if handled prop-
erly and confined to non-detri-
mental activities and a general
code of decency."

Dan is a member of Michi-
gauma and was seldom seen on
campus without his gold hatchet
firmly implanted in his lapel.
"Rumbling Rump," his Michigau-
ma name, said the tribe "has a
tremendous amount of influence
and is a fine experience for those
honored to be in it."
Dan was charged with chart-
ing the residence hall govern-
ment through its initial months
under a new system-one based on
a quadrangle, rather than on house
level as was the old Inter-House
Council.
IQC Action
He says IQC accomplished many
things as it represented its men
to the campus and urged action
from the Residence Halls Board
of Governors on which Dan sat.
"Headlines aren't necessary to get
work done," he says, listing sum-

Nohl, Seder
Discuss Bias
For Panhel
By MALINDA BERRY
Richard Nohl, '62BAd, president
of Student Government Council
and James Seder, '61, chairman of
the ~SGC Committee on Member-
ship and Student Organizations,
spoke Thursday to the Panhellen-
ic Association on the present po-
sition of the Committee.
Nohl explained that since soror-
ities and fraternities are student
organizations they come under the
jurisdiction of SGC under Re-
gents by-low 2-14, dealing with
anti-discrimination.
The SGC committee, established
in May 1960, requires that all stu-
dent organizations file in the of-
fice of the Dean of Men, any cri-
teria which pertains to the or-
ganization's selection of members.
File Complaint
If a person, a rushee or any
other person on campus should
file .a complaint, the committee
would begin by investigating that
complaint. If there is found to be
evidence of discrimination, a for-
mal hearing would be held.
After the formal hearing, if a
violation of the by-law occurred,
the committee would recommend
to SGC what action should be
taken.
Recommend Action
If it is found, after the hearing
and the recommendation to SGC,
that a group is, guilty of possess-
ing a bias clause, the committee
could recommend that any course
of action from withdrawal to giv-
ing their a specified length of
time to work out its problems with
its national headquarters.
Aid would be offered to any
group which desired assistance.
If a group decides to keep its
clause, SGC would then recom-
mend immediate removal of rec-
ognition.

i r
{ii

DIAL NO 5-6290
"A MIGHTY PICTURE .,..

NOW-Continuous Showings
Come any time Today between
12:30 and 8:00 P.M. and see a
complete showing.
REGULAR POPULAR PRICES
AN EPIC FILM!--Crowther, Times

THE SPECTACULAR LOVE STORY THAT THRILLED MILLIONSI
IMARGARET MfUHEUIS
BONE WITH THlE IND
n CLARK GABE' YWEN LEIGH
C IEE HOWARDOIA deHALANDmE Loft
A SEUZNICK INTERNATIONAL PICTURE- m~uo W METRO-GOLDWYN MAYER iNrc

Three Shows Daily at 12:30- 4:15 - 8:00 P.M.
Week Day Matinees 65c until 4:30 0 Evenings and Sunday 90c

MUSICAL FOUR-Two students and two twins, once members of
the Men's Glee Club, have Joined vocal forces to become the sing-
ing rage of the campus. Known as the Arbors, they have voiced
a preference for singing before college audiences.
ARTS AND LETTERS:
Arbors Prefer Harmony
To Popular Folk Music

NO

LConti
8-6416 From
"TOP-GRADE SUSPENSE"
N.Y.World-Telegram & Sun
A LLIF IM MAKERS ost y
JACK HAWKINS
RIGEL PATRICK
ROGER [IVESEY
and
RICHARD AlIENBOROUGH
IN t et i na0BSL fRE
ata
THEFAGUEofEFNLEMRaERTC
st - BRYAN FORBES KIERON MOORE " ROBERT COOTS

inuous
day
1 P.M.

By RISA AXELROD
What happens when four Uni-
versity students, two of whom are
twins, get together to "sing up a
storm?"
"We discuss our plans and pro-
grams in light of the audience for
which we're going to perform,"
Scot Herrick, '61E, arranger of
the "Arbors" quartet explains.
The Arbors, who were original-
ly members of the Men's 6lee Club
and later of the Friars, sing to-
gether with one voice, but speak
as individuals.
Congenial Group
A congenial group, the quartet
has been together almost a year.
They have sung at events ranging
from intercollegiate song festivals
to Union TGIT's.
The group got its impetus when
Herrick, Jack Ranson, '61, and
the twins, Fred, '61, and Ed Far-
ran, '61Ed, decided to sing at Gla-

DAN ROSEMERGY
... conservative view

Regents Accept
Gifts,, grants
From Groups
Gifts and grants totalling $39,-
675.16 were accepted by the Re-
gents Thursday.
From the Arabian American Oil
Company the Regents accepted
$6,000 for a renewal of the com-
pany's fellowships for Arab stu-
dents.
A gift of $7,196.27 for-the Phoe-
nix Atomic Research Program was
accepted from Richard H. Per-
kins.
Aaron Mendelson Memorial
Trust Fund has given $5,000 for
the Edgar Kahn Neurosurgery
Fund.
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Inglis has
given $5,000 for the Institute for
Social Research Building fund.
The Regents accepted $3,500
from Jersey Production Research,
Company for a chemical engineer-
ing fellowship.
Phillips Petroleum Company has
given $3,000 to renew a fellowship
in chemical engineering.
Texaco, Inc. has given $3,000 for
a mechanical engineering fellow-
ship.
Supplemental grants totalling
$1,580 for 10 National Merit
scholarships were accepted from
the National Merit Scholarship
Corporation.
A scholarship in chemical en-
ineering is provided for in a grant
of $1,500 from Universal Oil Pro-
ducts Co.

mer storage, graduate housing,
associate membership, athletic
equipment and IM sports, as areas
in which significant things were
done without much fanfare.
As an ex-officio member of the
Student Government Council, Dan
often aligned with Union Presi-
dent Perry Morton, '61, and Inter-
fraternity Council President Jon
Trost, '61, to form a solid conserv-
ative front.
Especially Active
The trio were especially active
in debating against condemnation
of the film "Operation Abolition"
and the Council action requiring
fraternities and sororities to file
statements of all membership re-
strictions and selection practices
with the Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs.
Dan was on the losing side in
these two issues, but was able to
successfully oppose a plan to im-
plement a student rights commit-
tee. He believes SGC is very effec-
tive because of its broad powers
over what he terms 'on campus'
issues.
The Council's role should be
more limited than it is now. It is
basically ineffective on off-cam-
pus problems as it has only 18 stu-
dents and can't possibly represent
what the campus opinion is cor-
rectly all the time.'
In evaluating the new council,
Dan views with alarm the lack of
a strong conservative voice.
Dan recognizes that the liberal
and conservative may both have
the same goals and objectives in
mind, differing only in means.
Evening With
THEODORE
BIKEL
Sunday-June 4
8:30 P.M.
FORD AUD. - DETROIT
Tickets - $3.50, 2.75, 1.75
Grinnell's, Downtown Detroit
Mail Orders -- Ford Aud., Detroit

i
t
s
t
e
i
i
i
t

Aquatic Arts Exhibition

cier National Park in Montana
this past summer. Although they
were based at one hotel, the Ar-
bors had opportunities to sing at
various locations throughout the
park.
This fall they participated in
the Intercollegiate Song Festival
at Cornell University, and were
twice invited to return for per-
formances.
Festival Here
"We'd love to have a song festi-
val here," the singers agreed. "By
bringing in other college groups
to sing we could present a pro-
gram which both the singers and
the audience would enjoy."
"We ourselves prefer to sing for
college audiences, even though we
have done some work in hotel
nightclubs," Jack stresses. "I guess
we like to have the complete at-
tention of the audience; in night-
clubs you have to, fight the con-
fusion of an audience which is
talking, eating and laughing," he
explains.
The members of the quartet find
that since they have been singing
they have become more critical of
popular music and records.
Modern Harmony
But the group agrees that mod-
ern harmony is much more chal-
lenging and interesting to sing.
In contrast to barbershop har-
mony, in modern harmony one
note does not lead directly to an-
other.
The quartet combines several
types of singing, but prefers mod-
ern harmony to folk music, bar-
bershop or rock and roll.
"We try to gauge our audience
and sing the songs that are most
suitable to each one," Fred Far-
ran explains. "But we still limit
our programs by our own prefer-
ences," he adds.

i

I

Cihe P aiI
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
JEAN COCTEAU'S
BEAUTY
AND THEBEAST
Music by Auric, Costumes by Berard;
with Jean Marais, Josette Day
SHORT: DOUBLE WHOOPEE,
WITH LAUREL AND HARDY
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

I
j

SYNCHRONIZED SPLASH-Michifish and Michifins, the Univer-
sity women's synchronized swimming groups, this week hosted the
Seventh Annual Festival of the International Academy of Aquatic
Art which culminated in public exhibitions Friday and Saturday
nights.
4 SHOWS DAILY
DIAL
2-6264 1:05 - 3:40 - 6:15 and 8:55
Feature 25 Min. Later
VI E IF IToIMAGAZINE

U

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GOING AWAY?
et us PACK and SHIP (insured of Course)
your Hi Fi Equipment and Records
HI F1 & TV CENTER-across from Hill Aud.

SIC
Henceforth, all students
*'k must have fun-filled, vicariously
exciting, sensuously delightful
Summer Vacations. In addition,
said students shall not allow
themselves to become
complacent and uninformed.
By Daily Proclamation,
all summer subscriptions
must be ordered immediately.
NO 2-3241
420 Maynard

COLUMBIA PICTURES yts .
SIDNEYPOUE f
CAUDIAMcNm-RBYDE D
&mouply Iw LORRAINE HIANSBERRY froth her pay&
= d by DAVID SUSSKIND and PHILIP ROSE
Dr.e yDANIEL PETRIE' s, '

,

N

11

THE MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB

wants:

* FIRST TENORS

* SECOND TENORS
* BARITONES
BASSES

11

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