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May 14, 1961 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-14

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MAY, MAY 14,.1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEI

DAY, MAY 14, 1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAI~F

Im"ira Or

MAN in fl)tikn
by MIKE GILIMAN

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Detroit Whips New York; Extends Lead,

Who To Blame?
WHO IS TO BLAME for the recent basketball scandals that have
tarnished the reputations of four eastern and three southern
schools? The obvious answer is found by stirring together professional
gamblers and athletes eager for an easy dollar, adding some coin
seasoning and waiting for the pot to boil.
But the editors of Sports Illustrated magazine aren't content with
that, and in the May 8 issue of SI point accusing fingers at the presi-
dents of the seven schools involved and Walt Byers, executive director
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Says SI, "They and
all other college presidents should share in the guilt for the corruption
of the players who took bribes from gamblers to fix games."
Alternate answers, of course, are preferred by the schools and by
Mr. Byers. The schools point to the obvious answer and disclaim all
responsibility. Byers says that the scandals are merely a reflection
of the poor moral climate of our times.
So who's right?
As in most cases when opposing parties to an issue set up their
battle lines, the real answer is probably somewhere in the middle.
But to the 'neutral observer, sitting on the sidelines, it appears as
if Byers is somewhat closer to a correct statement of the situation.
To be sure, university officials can't shrug off all the blame in
this sort of affair. The SI editorial points quite accurately to the
growing up on campuses of a double academic standard that can
accommodate the student-athlete. While less true at Michigan than
in many schools, few here are blind to the fact that some. of it
exists in our own University.
And not Just in the classroom, either. Coaches and administrators
will deny it, but the double-standard can be (and has been) stretched
to cover civil matters too. If you don't believe it, ask the Ann Arbor
patrolman-and promise not to identify him-and he can tell you
of wearers of the Maize and Blue caught in civil indiscretions that
were dealt with somewhat more leniently than the average student.
No, Michigan representatives are not going to cast any first stones.
But neither are representatives of most schools. At virtually all
but the smallest institutions, top athletes get a little "special" care.
As one report on the recent: scandals put it, "What's the difference
between getting something for playing well, or getting something for
playing 'smart'?"
To this extent, SI is correct in blaming the seven schools and
their administrators for making the athletes susceptible to the bland-
ishment waved under their noses.
But can anyone seriously suggest that a college president is
directly to blame for the incidents? One would guess that Michigan's
Harlan Hatcher knows scarcely a handful of the coaches (let alone
the players) and is hardly a guiding light in the running of the
athletic department. It is hardly likely that most college heads have
much more of a voice in spo'rts. It would seem that SI is going a little
far afield in search for a scapegoat.
MAYBE there isn't any person or persons that can be pinned down
fuas the culprits. Maybe Byers' explanation is closer to being
accurate.3
Let's face it, this country and the people in it are in danger of
losing completely the integrity, the sense of fair play and the inde-
pendence that settled the country and developed the industries that
brought America to world prominence.
Today, we're a nation of leaners-ready to lean on government,
union, business association, or the guy next door. Our independence
and uncertainty we've traded away for security and dependence. It's
easier to pay into big government funds for old age, medical care,
education, welfare and housing, than it is to learn how to do and
care for ourselves.
This is the atmosphere that these athletes were raised in-the
something-for-nothing atmosphere that pervades America today.
Once we had frontiers. Today (and please, this isn't just a partisan
comment) we are blessed with "The New Frontier." Is it really a new
-frontier , . . or is it a perversion of what the word frontier formerly
meant?
Athletes raised to think that society owes them a living can't
really be condemned for cashing in on what is "due" to them.
The idea of responsibilities being linked to rights-that's out of
date!
The random collection of thoughts in this corner shouldn't be
taken as a criticism of any person, policy, group' of persons or series
lof policies.
What they do total up to is a rather gloomy commentary. Byers'
comment looks more and more accurate in retrospect. Whether we talk
about basketball scandals or General Electric scandals we are talking
about America and Americans . . . we are talking about the not-so-
slow decay of responsibility and independence of these people .. .
and we're talking about what Byers terms, "the poor moral climate
of our times."
It's too bad .. . he's probably right.

By The Associated Press
The Detroit Tigers, spurred by
the homer-hitting of Rocky Cola-
vito and Dick Brown, whipped
New York for the second straight
day yesterday, 8-3, and increased
their American League lead over
the Yankees to 41/ games.
San Francisco clung to its slim
National League lead, thrashing
Milwaukee 8-5 on Willie Mays'
two home runs, one with the bases
loaded. Mays' second homer, his
eighth of the season, came with
one man on base.
Bucs Stay Close
Pittsburgh stayed close to the
top, outslugging the Cincinnati
Reds 13-5 as Pirate outfielder Bill
Virdon slammed a home run, tri-
ple, single, drew two walks and
scored three runs for a perfect
day at the plate.
Tom Sturdivant, sold by Boston
to Washington last in the expan-
sion draft last December, shackled
his former Red Sox mates with
one hit as he pitched the Senators
to a 4-0 triumph.
Gentile Hits 11th
Jim Gentile walloped his 11th
home run and drove in his 37th
run as the Baltimore Orioles de-
feated Cleveland 4-1 to move into
a virtual second place tie with the
Yankees. Minnie Minoso clouted a
pair of homers in the Chicago
White Sox 10-1 triumph over Kan-
sas City. Minnesota walloped Los
Angeles ,13-6.
Colavito, ejected Friday night
when he chased into the stands
after a spectator, had the Yan-
kee outfielders running dizzily,
trying to flag down his two home
runs and a pair of singles in five
times at bat. The homers were
the sixth and seventh of the sea-j
son for the Tiger outfielder.
Brown Big Bat
Catcher Brown batted in three
Tiger runs with a single and home
run. Brown's four-bagger came in
the eighth and snapped a 3-31

deadlock. Phil Regan, a 24-year-
old right-hander, went the dis-
tance for Detroit, permitting only
five hits for his third straight
victory.
A leadoff two-bagger by Vic
Wertz in the fifth inning pre-
vented Sturdivant from hurling a
Major League
Standings

no-hitter for the Senators. The
right-hander permitted only one
more runner to reach base. He
was Gary Geiger via a first in-
ning walk. Jim King provided
Sturdivant with more runs than
he needed when he slammed a
first inning home run with Gene
Woodling on base. Gene Conley
was the victim.
Brown Gets Win
Skinny Brown was credited with
Baltimore's victory. The veteran
righthander allowed the Indians
only five hits in seven innings for

his second success without a de-
feat. Hoyt Wilhelm hurled the
last two innings for the Orioles.
The loss was charged to Wynn
Hawkins, his first against three
triumphs.
Veteran Billy Pierce, loser of
two decisions this season, finally
notched his first victory of the
year for the White Sox. The little
lefty helped his cause with a pair
of run-scoring singles. One came
in a five-run second inning which
chased Kansas City starter Jerry
Walker.

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
June 2 to June 13, 1961
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the "Time of Class"
is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For courses having reci-
tation only, the "Time of Class" is the time of the first recitation period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below the
regular schedule. Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at
the preceding hour.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June 10, 12. 13
will be given an examination at an earlier date. The following schedule
designates an evening time for each such examination. The instructor may
arrange with the student for an alternate time, with notice to the sched-
uling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

I

I

NATIONAL

LEAGUE
W L Pct.

San Francisco 16 9 .640
x-Los Angeles 17 11 .607
Pittsburgh 14 10 .583
Cincinnati 14 12 .538
Milwaukee 11 11 .500
x-St. Louis 11 11 .500
x-Chicago 9 15 .375
x-Philadelphia 6 19 .240
x-Playinganight games.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 8, Milwaukee 5
Pittsburgh 13, Cincinnati 5
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 1
Chicago at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Los Angeles
Milwaukee at San Francisco
AMERICAN LEAGUE

D
r
3
B.
D
D
3
D

GB
11/
2z
3Y
s%
10
GB
4-
5%
7
8
8%
9/
9/

Tuesday, May 16, at 8 at Hillel
HONORS NIGHT and INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS
Speaker:
Dr. Lawrence B. Slobodkin
1961 Recipient, Henry Russell Award
"Speculations on Peck Order in Jews"
Refreshments
1429 Hill Street All are welcome

Regular
Exam Time
Special
Period
Regular
Exam Time
Special
Period

Mon., June 12
9-12 AM
Fri., June 2
7-10 PM
Tues., June 13
2-5 PM
Tues., June 6
7-10 PM

Mon., June 12
2-5 PM
Sat., June 3
7-10 PM
Sat., June 10
9-12 AM
Wed., June 7
7-10 PM

Tues., June 13
9-12 AM
Mon., June 5
7-10 PM
Sat., June 10
9-12 AM
Thurs., June 8
7-10 PM

I

I

I

IF

Detroit
New York
Naltimore
Minnesota
Cleveland
Bioton
Kansas City
Chicago
Washington
Los Angeles

w
20
14
15
14
12
10
10
11
9

L
7
10
11
12
13
13
12
14
17
15

Pet.
.741
.583
.577
.538
.480
.435
.429
.417
.393
.375

The New

Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

ContaCiess Type Lens

Time
of
Class

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 8, New York 3
Minnesota 13, Los Angeles 6
Chicago 10, Kansas City 1
Baltimore 4, Cleveland 1
Washington 4, Boston 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at New York
Boston at Washington
BaltimoreataCleveland
Kansas City at Chicago
Los Angeles at Minnesota

So tiny it balances on
your finger tip!

SO SCARCELY
NOTICEABLE *

So comfortable to
"wear."

SPORTS SHORTS:
Oregon Breaks Record;
Sachs Takes 500 Pole

MONDAY
TUESDAY
*Classes beginning on
hour

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
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at
at
the half

8
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Sat. June
Mon., June
Tues., June
Sat. June
Wed., June
Thur., June
Thur. June
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9-12
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Time of Examination

7

By The Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. - Smooth-
striding Dyrol Burleson anchored
the University of Oregon to vic-
tory in the four-mile relay event
at the West Coast Relays today
in 16:29.3. The time smashed both
the official and pending American
records.
The junior from Cottage Grove,
Ore., who last year became the
second American to run a mile in
less than four minutes, sped the
distance today in 4:00.3.
Oregon's team of Voctor Reeve,
George Larson, Keith Forman and
Burleson beat Oregon State and
Houston. They eclipsed both the
official record of 16:52.6 by an
AAU team in 1952 and the pend-
ing mark of 16:50.4 by Western
Michigan at the Drake Relays.
Southern California's Rex Caw-
ley cracked the meet record in
the 400-meter hurdles, an Olympic
event, winning in 49.9 seconds.
That bettered the 50.8 that Dickie
Howard of New Mexico did in 1959

and was the fastest the race has
been run anywhere this year.
500 Trials"
INbIANAPOLIS - Eddie Sachs
today came back from a bad 1960
wreck and won the pole position
for the 500-mile Auto Race for
the second straight year. The feat
had been accomplished only twice
before since the first Memorial
Day speed classic 50 years ago.
The 22 qualifiers, largest num-
ber on opening day since World
War II, was faster overall har.
ever before. It averaged 145.261,
compared with a record average of
144.863 for the 16 qualifiers on
last year's first day of trials.
* * *
Cheerleaders
A cheerleading clinic will be
held in the Auxiliary Glm in the
I-M Building between 4 and 5
p.m. on May 15-18 under the di-
rection of the present cheerlead-
ers. All interested persons are in-
vited. Final tryouts for all posi-
tions will be held on September 8.

BUT this is not enough to assure success. All
day safe wear comes from a combination of con-
trolled adjustments plus the thorough conscien-
tious care afforded by an interested professional
man.
.X.
Our offices for fitting and adjusting contact
lenses are equipped with the most advanced in-
struments and laboratory for this specialized
service. Fittings are administered by a registered
doctor of optometry.
For consultation without obligation to deter-
mine whether you can wear contact lenses, call
NO 5-5306.
DrH. W. Bennett-Optometrist
117 SOUTH MAIN ST.-On Ground Floor

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

I

e scheduled at the preceding

Acctg. 100, 101, 200, 201
Acctg. 100, 101, 200, 201
Business Ad. 150
Business Ad. 150
Business Ad. 181
Business Ad. 181
Finance 101
Finance 101
Industr. Relations 100
Industr. Relations 100
Indust. Relations 150
Industr. Relations 150
Mktg. 100, 101
Mktg. 100, 101
Stat. 100
Stat. 100

A
P
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Fri.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,
Mon.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Thurs.
Mon.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

L

.---

J~s

E. E.5'
E. E. 5
Graphics 1
Graphics 1
Graphics 2, 4
Graphics 2, 4
E. M. 2
E. M. 2

C Mon.,
U Tues.
C Mon.,
T Mon.,
J Sat.,
S Sat.,
F Thurs.,
Q Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS

TI

Bot. 1, 2
Bot. 1, 2
Chem. 4, 6, 182, 183
Chem. 4, 6, 182, 183
Econ. 51, 52. 53, 54
Econ. 51, 52, 53, 54
Econ. 71, 72
Econ. 71, 72
English 23, 24
English 23, 24
Fr. 1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 21, 22,
32, 61, 62
Fr. 1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 21, 22,
32, 61, 62
Geog. 1
Geog. 1
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,
35, 36
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,
35, 36
Latin 22
Latin 22
Physics 54
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Sociology 60
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32
Spanish i, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32

C
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Mon.,
Tues.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Fri.,
Mon.,
Fri.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

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U Tues., June 13

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Wed.,
Sat.,
Mon.,

June
June
June

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S Sat., June 10

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Tues.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

6
10
6
12
6
13
8
13
6
10

SUPER SMOOTH
SHAVE
New "wetter-than-water" action melts beard's tough-
ness-in seconds. Remarkable new "wetter-than-water"
action gives Old Spice Super Smooth Shave its scientific
approximation to the feather-touch feel and the efficiency of
barber shon shaves. Melts your beard's toughness like hot

Each course requiring a special examination is assigned two examina-
tion code letters. If one is preferred by the department, it is in boldface;
students may elect the other only if a conflict occurs and special permis-
sion was secured from the departmental representative at registration
time in the gymnasium. If neither is underlined, either is available for
selection by each student without regard to the section of the course In
which he is enrolled.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of the
University Final Examination Scheduling Committee. Questions concern-
ing the schedule should be directed to Edward G. Groesbeck, 1513 Ad-
ministration Building.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the niversitvFo r time andn lao0 nf vaminatinns _ lleti

I

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' opJJ~ls-aloIIC ~fle onlarfne~w tclr~ics-. ; 3.

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