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May 11, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

School Adds
New Courses
To Prograin
The education school faculty
approved two new graduate cours-
es and program changes in their
meeting early this week.
To be part of the master's de-
gree program in Russian studies,
a. course in "History of Educa-
tional Ideas in Russia and East-
ern Europe" will be offered by
Prof. William K. Medlin of the
education school.
An advanced course in curricu-
lum theory and practice for those
engaged in curriculum design will
be offered in relation to the edu-
cational school and doctoral pro-
grams.
Also, C-20, a course, which al-
lows students to work in indus-
trial, social and educational agen-
cies while receiving instruction
will be experimentally linked with
sections of C-11, an introductory
course in psychological principles
of teaching. This 'Is an effort to
integrate more laboratory experi-
ence with methods, courses.
Various program changes have
been made"in the physical edu-
cation minor' for women. The
,changes are aimed at strengthen-
ing the students background in the
single field' of physical education
rather than the present inadequate
background in the three fields of
health, physical education and
recreation.
Tw6 oConcerts
The Men's Glee Club will pre-
sent two concerts at 7:00 and 9:30
p.m. Saturday in Hill Aud. under
the direction of Philip Duey.
These, two concerts will mark
the one hundred and second anni-
versary of the glee club's spring
concerts.
As has become traditional, the
Friars, a group of eight men
selected from the club ,member-
ship, will be featured during the
performances.
A inale quartet, the Arbors, will
also take part , in the concerts.
They are, in part, an off-shoot of
the Friars.

Pennsylvania
Raps Loeal
For HaZing
The University of Pennsylvania
suspended its local Pi Lambda Phi
chapter Monday for violation of
regulations forbidding "excessive
hazing".
The University Committee on
Discipline would not reveal details
of the charge against the frater-
nity, which resulted in requiring it
to close its house and cease all
social functions for one year.
The action followed a series of
articles in the Daily Pennsylvanian
which charged that severe hazing,
including in one case branding
with a hot ironwas a common
practice in a great many of the
three dozen fraternities on campus.
Daily Pennsylvanian editor Mel-
vin Goldstein commented that the
paper opposed the suspension be-
cause of the "ambiguity of the
regulations" and because "the
committee is just making an ex-
ample out of one group even
though many are doing it."
"But the University has never
defined just what 'excessive haz-
ing' means," he added.
Sasaki To Speak
Oan Zen Religion
Genjun R. Sasaki, professor at
Otani University, Japan, will
speak today on "Self-Interpreta-
tion-Zen and Its Historical Back-
ground" at 4:10 p.m. in Rm. 1025,
Angell Hall.
His talk is being sponsored by
the Far Eastern languages and
literature department.
Burnett To Talk
At Math Seminar
Professor D. Burnett of Rhodes
University, Grahamstown, South
Africa, will speak to the Aerody-
namics and Applied Mathematics
Seminar at 4:00 p.m. today in Rm.
311 West Engineering Bldg. The
subject of his speech will be "Pro-
pagation of High Frequency Sound
Waves in Gases at Very Low Pres-
sures.''

GRADUATE STUDIES:
To Consider Changes
In Linguistic Program

1

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NOTICE TO
ALL CATHOLIC STUDENTS
TODAY is the Feast of the Ascension
a Holyday of Obligation
MASSES at St. Mary's Chapel are at
6:30, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 5 P.M.

-- i

By MARTHA MacNEAL
"The possibility that the pres-
ent program in linguistics may
become a separate department of
the literary college is being dis-
cussed, but the Regents have not
yet considered the idea," Dean
Roger W. Heyns of the literary=
college said yesterday.
The linguistics program is now
administered by the linguistics
committee, composed of six mem-
bers from various departments of
the University, appointed by the
dean of the graduate school. De-
partmental representation on the
committee varies with student
needs.
Primarily Graduate
"Linguistics is primarily a grad-
uate program," Prof. Herbert H.
Paper of the Near Eastern studies
department, chairman of the com-
mittee, said.
"But we nowrhave more under-
graduate majors in this field or
majors in English or foreign lan-
guage taking linguistics courses."
The program presently serves
approximately sixty linguistics
students and students in other de-
partments such as anthropology,
Far Eastern studies, and various
foreign languages.
"Recognition of the importance
of linguistic study is implicit in
the National Defense Education
Act," Prof. Paper pointed out. "It
is no longer possible to major in
a language without linguistical
training.
Need Analysis
"There is now a critical need
for analyses of languages that
have never been analyzed before,"
he said, citing specifically the
languages of African nations.
"The Foreign Service Institute
of the State Department is staffed
with linguistic specialists. Linguis-
tical training is vital to the teach-
ing of English as a second lan-
guage, as in the Peace Corps.
Likewise, many American high
school teachers are being retrain-
ed in linguistics at summer insti-
tutes," he said.

Requirements for major concen-
tration in linguistics demand pre-
vious concentration in a language
beyond the first two years, and
"wide experience in language
study."
Specific requirements for stu-
dents desiring to concentrate on a
certain language within the lin-
guistics program are worked out
with faculty members In the var-
ius language departments.
"Usually students start their
graduate study in linguistics with-
out any undergraduate training
in that field, primarily because
few institutions offer courses in
linguistics," Paper said.
The linguistics program also
serves occasional non-language
majors who take a few courses
for other departments.
Society Taps
New Squires
Know all ye citizens that all
true knights must through squire-
ship go by starlight.
Know all ye citizens that many
squires train by starlight to be-
come sires.
Know all ye citizens, your ob-
ligationis, for these men train to
lead our nation.
Know all ye citizens, by the
Five Stars of Scabbard and Blade,
Squires these men are:
William J. Blanton, '62BAd;
Lucian F. Bloodworth, '62BAd;
Gerald E. Ross, '62E; David L.
Wentworth, '62; Konrad C. King,
'62; Dana M. Schmidt, '63E; Da-
vid H. Kibler, '62E; John L.
Touhy, '62; James L. Yost, '62.
William P. Vockel '63E; Larry
A. Stinson, '63E; David E. Barn-
hart, '63E; Robert G. Dickinson,
'62; Thomas P. Fetters, '62NR;
Michael J. Petz, '63E; Thomas M.
Stone, '62E; Paul R. Sullivan,
'62E; Gary L. Barnes, '63E.
THE FIVE STARS HAVE
SHONE

Student Art Print Loan:
Prints Are Due:
THURSDAY, MAY 18th, 1-5 P.M.
FRIDAY, MAY 19th, 1-5 P.M.
SATURDAY, MAY 20th, 1-5 P.M.
ROOM 528
BASEMENT STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
U of M Folklore Society and Creative Arts Festival
A Concert of Folk Music with
JACK ELLIOTT
FRIDAY, May 19, 1961 -8:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
TICKETS ONLY 90c
On Sale at: Union, Disc Shop, Hi-Fi & TV Center

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Presents
Thursday and Friday:
THE QUIET MAN
Saturday and, Sunday:,
NIGHTS OF CABIRIA,
(NOTE: Because of the Architecture School Open House,
there will be but ONE showing (7:00) of "Nights of Cabiria"
on Saturday, May 13. It will be shown twice on' Sunday as
usual.)

an

} r
DIAL 5-6290
'STARTING
FRIDAY

ENDING TODAY
WALT DISNEY'S
"ABSENT-MINDED
PROFESSOR"

DIAL
2-6264

STARTS
TO DAY

PLEASE NOTE
TIME SCHEDULE

A MEMORABLE MOTION PICTURE EVEN]
SALUTE THE CIVIL WAR CENTENNIA
The love story that thrilled millions;
in all its sweeping glory!
DAVIDOSElNICK8
MARGARET MiTCHEES
ST M RDB~N
GONE 'WITH TSHE WIND i EHWLRs :
iN
T EC H NICO LOR

T TO
L!
rss

THE NEVER BEFORE SHOWN
TRUTH ABOUT HITLER'S REICH!

1

i

I

I

The Quiet Man does not suffer
from over-subtlety. Arthur
Knight, who liked the picture,
spoke not only of its artistic
merits. but of freedom from
artiness. This is just as well,
with John Wayne playing the
hero, Sean Thornton, "a boxer
whose career in America has
ended with killing a man in the
ring. At this point, the opening
of the picture, Sean has only
two wishes; to retire to the old
sod alid never to use his fists
again. Obviously, there is going
to be a particularly bloody fight
toward the end of the picture;
and with the logic of sentiment,
rather than any stricter course,
the film moves toward this de-
nouement., Sean's purchase of
his ancestral Irish home, his
unconsummated marriage to the
sister of the local bully, the
shenannigans of the local fac-
totum and the village priest,
two characters whose leisure
would be the envy of every
American, are attractive bits of
blarney.
Three factors in the film ren-
der more than acceptable the
blend of sentiment and melo-
drama and the improbable plot.
First, the color photography,
shot in Ireland, is extremely
beautful. Secondly, the per-
formances of Barry Fitzgerald,
Mildred Natwick, Ward Bond,
Victor McLaglen, and many Ab-
bey Players invest the thin
characterizations with convinc-
ing life. Thirdly, John Ford's
direction is exceptionally skill-
ful. Ireland is the home of* his
ancestors, and he evidently
shares the feelings of his pro-
tagonist, having announced, in
fact, that The Quiet Man was
his best work to that date, a'
verdict to which few who have'
seen The Informer and The
Grapes of Wrath would agree.
It does indicate his love of Ire-
land. We suggest that the cap-
tious will find sone tasty in-
gredients in this Irish stew and
heartier appetites will devour it
undemurringly.
* * *
Italy escaped World War II a
bleeding, ravaged country. Its
legacy of starvation, degrada-
tion and cynicism hardly
seemed a promising seed bed for
a vital art form.
Yet from this sordid back-
ground, and partly because of
it, sprang a new style in film-
making, a style perfectly suited
to expressing the universal re-

Fellini, who did the scenarios
for Open City and Paisan, two
of the most revered neo-realis-
tic films.
Fellini left Rossellini during
the late forties to direct his own
films and his success has far
overshadowed that of his men-
tor.
His I Vitelloni stamped him
as a film artist of. great sensi-
tivity and perception. More re-
cently his La Strada proclaimed
him a mature artist of real
stature.
Fellini works in the neo-
realistic genre of his former col-
league but, like all true artists,
he has advanced the style
rather than fallen victim to it.
While his films retain a spon-
taniety and unmanneredness
they are uncluttered by the
aimless detail that often pla-
gues other neo-realistic films.
He retains control of the action
without seeming to.
'His 1957 film, Nights of Ca-
birla, which we are showing
Saturday and Sunday, was com-
pared favorably by many critics
to the superb La Strada.
Actually there is but little to
choose between them. Besides
Fellini's masterly direction both
have the inestimable advantage
of Giuletta Masina, the direc-
tor's wife, in the starring role.
Those who ) ,ire seen La Stra-
da can hardly have forgotten
her performance as the strange;
wide-eyed, doomed waif.
In Cabiria. her portrayal of
the prostitute whose innocence
remains intact despite the sor-
didness of her surroundings is
no less memorable.
To those who alreadly cringed
in horror at the prospect of yet
another innocent prostitute, let
me hasten to add this is not
merely another sentimentaliza-
tion of the oldest profession.
Fellini's unerring eye and Miss
Masina's delicate performance
transform what is essentially a
trite subject into a meaningful
statement on the nature of in-
nocence.
A constant concern of Fel-
lini's is the gap between appear-
ance and essence in the world.
Therefore we find Cabiria, a
true innocent, cloaked in the
guise of a prostitute while a
religious shrine becomes a mar-
ket place' where hucksters sell
cheapmedals, candles and re-
freshments to┬░ the hysterical
and lame who come to the
shrine to be cured.

;

WINNER OF TEN ,
CLRK GBEACADEMY AWARS
M~ ELE~O D ONYA deHAVILAN~) ,
3 Shows Doily at 12:30-4:15 and 8 p.m.

I

THE TERRIFYING RISE AND
RU~IN FHTLER'S REICIl*

SHOWS AT 1:00 - 3:05 - 5:10
7:05 and 9:15
FEATURE AT 1:09 - 3:15 - 5:12
7:15 and 9:25

HEAR FROM HITLER'$ OWN UPS..
THE RAGING WORDS THAT SHOOK /
THE WORLD!

I

1 I

mmmobi

S.G.C. Cineid ql
TONIGHT and FRIDAY at 7 and 9:10 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
THEFELN" QUIET MANFELNS NIGHTS
COLOR OF CABIRIA
,.,+11 MelIA Lsrn - with Giuletta Masina,

I

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