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May 10, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG~AN fDAILY

ALUMNI MEET:
Conference To Study
Problems of Business

CAREERS PANEL-Members of the panel discussing vocations in English and journalism came to
the conclusion that, while a college major in these fields is very helpful, it is not an absolute
necessity for success in the professions.

The business administration!
school will sponsor its 31st annual
Alumni Conference, Friday and
Saturday.
The program will feature Uni-
versity professors and students1
and state and national business
leaders who will discuss various
aspects of the business world.-
The conference will open with a.
discussion of "American Business
in a Changing World Economy,
at 2 p.m. Friday in Rm. 130, Bus.
Ad. Bldg.
The discussion group will in-
clude Prof. Paul W. McCracken of
the school of business administra-
tion, Henry W. Balgooyen of
American and Foreign Power Com-
pany, and Ray W. McDonald of
the Burroughs Corporation.
Robert P. Briggs of Consumers
Power Company, Michigan State
Chamber of Commerce and the
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
will deliver the business leadership
award lecture at 8 p.m. Friday in
Auditorium A.
Prof. Clare E. Griffin will dis-
cuss "The New Face of American
Capitalism," at 10 a.m. Saturday.
Griffin was former dean of the
business administration school and
now serves as a Fred M. Taylor
Professor of Business Economics.
At a luncheon at the Michigan
Union Ballroom at 12:15 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dean Floyd A. Bond will
speak on "A Look Back and a
Look Ahead."
The last afternoon will be spent
in separate discussion and lecture
groups, divided according to spe-
cific business fields.
Donald C. Cook of American
Electric Power Service Corporation
City Changes
Traffic Plan
Two-way traffic will be in effect
on Liberty St. from Maynard St.
west beginning at midnight Satur-
day, Guy C. Larcom, Jr., City Ad-
ministrator said Monday.
Liberty will remain one-way in
the single block from Maynard to
S. State St. as part of the State
St. "loop" system. Liberty begins
at State St. and extends past W.
Stadium Blvd. to the west.
The City Council agreed to the
installation of traffic signals on
Liberty at S. First and S. Ashley
Sts. as part of the new traffic
arrangement. They also passed a
banning of turns from Liberty
onto Main St. between 7-9 a.m.
and 4-6 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
However, Larcom said that two-
way traffic on Liberty may be-
come so congested it will be ne-
cessary to r-ohibit parking on
alternate sides during rush hours.
Panhel Plans
Interviewing
Members of Junior Panhellenic
Association who are interested in
joining the newly-revised Pan-
hellenic Assocation Secretariat
Committee may sign up for an in-
terview in the Panhel office on the
first floor of the Student Activities
Building, said Sandy Halverson,
'62Ed, secretarial manager.
Interviewing begins today and
will continue through Saturday.
Members of the Secretariat, the
connecting link between Junior
and Senior Panhel, do secretarial
work for Senior Panhel. It is also a
training ground for future Panhel
executive positions.

will speak to the accounting ses-
sion on "Financial Implications of
Accelerated Depreciation."
Also speaking at this session will
be Lewis H. Rappaport of Rybrand,
Ross Brothers and Montgomery on
the topic of "Current Problems in
Reporting to the Securities and
Exchange Commission."
A discussion of "Performance,
Appraisal and Counseling-A Con-
troversial Practice," will be held at
the marketing meeting. The dis-
cussion will be led by George S.
Odiorne of the University Bureau
of Industrial Relations, Robert C.
W. Sadler of the J. L. Hudson
Company of Detroit and G. J. Wil-
liams of the Dow Chemical Com-
pany.
Three University professors and
one University student will discuss
"Business Games as a Training
Device," at the statistics and in-
dustrial management session.
Robert B. Upson, member of the
University's 1961 national cham-
pionship Student Business Game
Team, will join professors Wallace
W. Gardner, Lee E. Danielson and
Carl H. Pollmar of the business
administration school.

Largest Issue,
Of Generation
To Go on Sale
The largest issue in the history
of Generation, the campus arts
magazine, will be on sale tomorrow
and Friday at the Fishbowl, An-
gell Hall, the Michigan Union and
on the Diag.
The 124 page magazine will in-
clude three original complete musi-
cal scores, an essay on the con-
temporary British poet, William
Empson, and poetry by student
and guest writers such as John
Heath-Stubbs.
The expansion into the other
creative arts instead of concen-
tration on fiction is an indication
of the format of next year's Gen-
eration, Roger Reynolds, '61M,
the incoming editor, said.
There will be more editorials
and essays articulating and de-
fending various viewpoits in the
arts, he said.
"Generation should not be just
an outlet for student writing, but
can define and set trends."
As part of its plans for ex-
pansion, Generation is sponsoring
an arts forum, in conjunction
with the Creative Arts Festival
May 17 in the Undergraduate Li-
brary. It will also have a weekly
arts column in The Daily next
semester.

UTHEI FALF HIWN!
AUTH ENTIC FILMS NEVER BEFORE SHOWN!

DIAL A
2-6264 THRSAn
K~THURSDAY 7

L

* ENDS TONIGHT *
Dean Martin
Shirley MacLaine
"All in a Night's Work"

Nated by CLAUDE STEPNEND Written ad Edited by ERWIN LEISER
PoducedbyTORE SJOBERG A MINERVA INTERMI1OAL PRODUCTION
A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE
Shows at1:00- 3:05 - 5:10 - 7:05 and 9:15
Features at 1:09 - 3:15 - 5:12 - 7:15 and 9:25

Baxter Holds Musicale
For Forestry Students

MAY MUSICALE-Students' and alumni are guests of Prof. Dow
Baxter of the school of forestry at the annual musicale in which
he presents his original musical poems.

U:

By STEVEN SHAW
"Who says a professor can't
know his students in a large uni-
versity?" questioned Dow Baxter,,
pathologist in the Forestry school
at May Musicale.
For the past 34 years Baxter hast
invited all of his present and
former students to the annual
musical party on the first night
after the concluding performance
of May Festival.
"This party is in honor of my
students-to honor them for what
the're going to be," he said. He
pointed out that out of the eight
students at the first Musicale in
1926, one is Dean of Forestry at
South Carolina and another is the
state forester for Florida. This
year more than one hundred per-j
sons attended.
Different Theme
Each musicale has a different
theme. This year's theme, "The
New Curriculum," was a part of;
the more general idea of "Life
Concepts."
The program revolved around
strange course descriptions in the
new college catalog. All course de-
scriptions were sung by the stu-
dents.
Certain subjects in "Arias from
Seven May Musicales," were playedI
by the Pathology Philharmonic
Orchestra augmented by singers
Deanna Yaughlin and Frederick

and Edward Farran, all of
school of natural resources.
Philosophy

the I

Ill

This year Baxter and his stu-
dents sang of "Every Day Philos-
ophy":
The light shines through
to everyone
the best is path-ol-ogy.
The fungi belong to everyone
We know they're for you and me.
The spores -inspring
The mushrooms they bring,
The conks on the pine,
They're yours, they're mine.
We see more fungi, all the time,
It's' all mighty fine, mighty fine!
Following the program Baxter
stated that he had proven his
point "that professors-who write
funny songs and pound away on
their pianos are certain to make
friends with their students."
He summed up the evening with
his favorite idiom, "mighty fine,
yes in-deedy, mighty fine!"
Art Departmelt
To Show Movies
The history of art department
will sponsor three abstract Ger-
man movies at 4:15 p.m. today in
203 Tappan Hall.
The movies are: "Rhythmus 21,"
"Symphonie Diagonale" and
"Ghosts Before Breakfast."

aIf

Presents.

}
t"

POETRY
READING HOUR
Faculty Poets and their Works

X. J. Kennedy
J. R. Squires
Th urs., May 11
7:30

D. Hall
S. Baker
UNION
Third Floor
conference room

i

7

Student Art Print Loan:
Prints Are Due:
THURSDAY, MAY 18th, 1-5 P.M.
FRIDAY, MAY 19th, 1-5 P.M.
SATURDAY, MAY 20th, 1-5 P.M.
ROOM 528
BASEMENT STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING

1

I1

The Michigan Union
nniversity Day Leaders

II

STARTING
TON1IGHT

Z
' ,

D AL
NO 8-6416

"The most brilliant, the most

intelligent, the most
exciting movie

I

I have encoun-
tered this

> '4 .:

season!hewYorker

0
Or
t,

. >S1

WHEN: Saturday morning,
May 3
WHAT: to lead groups of
high school seniors
Interested students are asked

I

i

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