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May 03, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Katanga

Cabinet
a Policy

Views.

Change

1]

on

UN

4

To Enforce
BanB on Bias
WASHINGTON ()-Vice-Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson yesterday
told the nation's top defense con-
tractors th ° government is going
to speak softly but carry a big
stick in enforcing its ban on ra-
cial bias on federal projects.
Johnson, chairman of President
John F. Kennedy's Comiittee on
Equal Employment Opportunity,
hinted to newsmen after his closed
meetings with the contractors that
the committee already has moved
to curb alleged discrimination at
a big jet plane factory in Geor-
gia-.
The plant at Marietta, Ga., has
a 41 billion contract to manufac-
ture the newest big jet transport.
Negro groups have charged wide-
spreadl job discrimination at the
plant. Johnson declined to say
what has been done there.
The machinists union, which
represents workers at the plant,
announced it received word yes-
terday that an all-Negro unit of
the union voted Sunday to merge
with three, all-white locals. The
union's headquarters here gave its
approval.
The Vice-President said repre-
sentatives of 48 of the nation's
,biggest defense contractors all
agreed to cooperate fully with the
terms of Kennedy's executive or-
der barring discrimination in hir-
ing or other employment practices
on federal projects because of
race, creed, solor or national ori-
gin.
Johnson said the contractors
came to him individually after the
meeting to commend Kennedy's
program and pledge their cooper-
ation.
In. speaking to the contractors
Johnson noted that his committee
has the power to cancel contracts,
hold investigations in public,
blacklist firms from further con-
tracts, or seek court injunctions
to obtain compiance.,.
,.World New
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Appropriations Committee approv-
ed yesterday President John F.
Kennedy's request for $500 mil-
lion to help launch a -cooperative
Latin-American economic and so-
cial development program.
The bill, passed by the House
last week, also carries an addi-
tional $100 million for loans to aid
Chile's rehabilitation from last
May's earthquake damage.
KATMANDU, Nepal-An eight-
man Red Chinese economic mis-
sion arrived yesterday to complete
arrangements for use of 100 mil-
lion rupees ($14 million) in aid
Communist China granted Nepal
last year. Among projects planned
are cement and paper mills.
s s
UNITED NATIONS-A United
Nations spokesman said yesterday
26 mercenaries serving in the Ka-
tanga province army will be oust-
ed from the Congo in a few days.
The expulsions will be the first
carried out under a series of UN
resolutions against non-UN foreign
personnel in the Congo.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS-A' United
Nations spokesman said yesterday
that a Soviet economist had
agreed to assist'Secretary-Gener-
al Dag Hammarskjold in a study
of the economic and social con-

sequences of disarmament.
He listed Prof. V. Y. Aboltin of
the Soviet Union as one of five
men who had agreed as consult-
ants in the study, ordered by the
General Assembly last Dec. 15
when it adopted a Pakistani reso-
lution on the subject.
DAR ES-SALAAM, Tanganyika
-Julius K. Nyerere, the new prime
minister of Tanganyika, said yes-
terday his country is pr6pared to
* t

Historic Flight Delayed

.-AP wirephoto
FLIGHT DELAYED-U.S. astronaut Alan B. Shepard's attempt.
to become America's first spaceman was cancelled yesterday by
storms. There also have been reports tia tthe liquid oxygen
line of his Redstone rocket was damaged. (See story, page one).
APPROVED 8-1:
Kennedy's SchoolBill
Sent1to Senate Floor'

May Disband
Army, Oust
For'eigners
Leaders To Confer
On New Governmen
ELISABETHVILE M ( - Wi
President Moise Tshombe 1st
ield prisoner by the Central Co
go, Government, the cabinetc
this secessionist province prom
ised yesterday to discuss Unit
Nations demands on disbandi
the Katanga army and oustii
foreign' advisers.
In what appeared to be a con
plete policy switch, the cabin
also asked the.UN to organize
new conference of Congo leade
to decide the future form of t]
Congo government.
The cabinet's decision was sp
to UN Secretary-General D
Hammarskjold in New 'York a
announced to diplomats here 1
the three men ostensibly in co
trol of 'Katanga while Tshoml
is away.
Three Ministers
They were Godefroid Munong
the strongman minister of the i
terior; Vice-President Jean Ki
we; and Joseph Kiwele, minist
of education.
Last week Tshombe walked o
of a conference of Congo leade
at Coquilhatville, deriding Coni
President J os e p h Kasavubu
agreement with the UN to oust a
foreign advisers and military m
not in the Congo on UN busines
Congolese/'troops then arresti
Tshombe.
The agreement was aimed pr
marily at Tshombe's mercena
white foreign legion and foreign
civilians, chiefly Belgians, who
he retained in the civil estabis]
ment of Katanga.
Detained Belgians
Congo troops who arrested hi
at Coquilhatville also detained fi
Belgians accompanying him ther
Two were Belgian newsmen bas
in Elisabethville. Tshombe w
lodged in a riverside villa at C
quilhatville. The Belgians we
removed to Leopoldville.
(In Brussels, the Foreign Mi
istry announced that Belgium h
asked the UN immediately to r
lease the five Belgians held I
UN authorities in Lepoldville.)
The cabinet statement said th
Katanga, once proclaimed an I
dependent republic by Tshomb
now would cooperate with the U
to the extent of discussing t
outstanding questions becau
Kasavubu had returned to the id
of a sovereign Congo Confeder
tion adopted at a meeting of Co
go leaders in Tananarive, Malag
sy Republic, earlier this year.
The UN, by resolutions of t
Security Council and the Gener
Assembly, has insisted on t
ouster of private foreign advise
and military mercenaries. It a
provided for reorganizing t
Congolese Central Army a
breaking up private armies
political leaders.
But UN bodies have taken, t
proclaimed attitude that the Co
go people themselves must deci
what form of government th
will have.

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Economics
Committee
Asks Action
WASHINGTON (M)-Recommen-
dations fdr lower interest rates, a
federally aided public works pro-
gram and studies of tax cut possi-
bilities came yesterday from the
majority of a sharply divided Sen-
ate - House Joint Economic Com-
mittee.
Most of the Republican members
dissented loudly in a report hitting
what they called interest rate tam-
pering as a permanent policy. They
said "it would be courting inflation
and a new gold crisis to plan now
new government spending pro-
grams."
Moreover;three Senate members
of the committee, including Demo-
crat William E. Proxmire (D-Wis),
filed individual statements regis-
tering varying degrees of disagree-
ment.
The joint' committee's book-
length report, carrying dissents
and appendages, is its annual re-
view 6f the economic report of the
President. Partisan argument was
virtually inevitable this year, since
the committee had before it, in
effect, two reports-former Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower's last
one and the series of economic
messages and recommendations
sent to Congress by President John
F. Kennedy.
The majority said -"we believe
and hope" the recession is turning
the corner. But it termed the eco-
nomic upturn in view hardly ade-
quate to do more than provide
jobs for the people newly entering
the labor force.
The majority recommen'ded
prompt enactment of the Kennedy
economic proposals and added sug-
gestions of its own.

SATELLITE:
U.S. Calls Castro Re
WASHINGTON (y-The Unit-
ed States yesterday labeled Cuba other Red regimes at least hold most all the other Red
a member of the Communist Bloc elections even though the voters because only the Soviet
and said Prime Minister Fidel Cas- don't get a choice of candidates. Czechoslovakia term 1
tro is more "Communist" than "The Cuban has but one choice, "socialist republics" in.
most Iron Crutain rulers. namely to say 'si,' at mass meet- of their avowed drive
The United States view was out- ings called by Castro the way Communist society.
lined by State Department press Hitler and Mussolini used mass The Washington p
officer Lincoln White in comment rallies for their version of show- ment, which came two w
on Castro's May Day speech pro- ing the so-called will of the peo- the failure of a Unite
claiming Cuba a socialist state ple,"the United States statement backed invasion of Cub
and ruling out elections. said. Castro exiles, was the
Despite public concern over 2. By using the term "socialist" cial United States p
growing ties between Havana and to describe Cuba under his rule, ment labeling Cuba a n
Moscow-Peiping, the United States Castro is going further than al- the Communist camp.
had refrained until yesterday
from calling the Castro regime a
member of the Communist camp.
But yesterday, White said Cuba
"has certainly become a member
of the (Communist) bloc."
The United States spokesman
gave two examples in saying Cas-
tro has gone further down the Of t
Communist road since he came to
power on Jan. 1, 1959 than most
Red rulers:-'_"
1. The Soviet Union and most (f
Delegates To Open
That could be
Asian Conference
sma~frte than this
MANILA (P)-Delegates and ob-
servers from 25 nations completed dualp oL
preliminary steps yesterday for
the seventh annual conference of
the Asian people's anti-Communist
league.
The conference opens today, *"Under the smarts
then breaks up for separate dis-
cussions of Communis in South-bs
east Asia, Africa, the Middle East, tume is on attra
Europe and Latin America. Unitedk d
States Senator Thomas J. Dodd c oc k taoil dress.
(DConn), will be the keynote 9
speaker. 29.95

Cuba's Road to Socialism
Violates Marxian Doctrine

O--

WASHINGTON (A)-An 8-1 vote
,of approval by the Senate Educa-
tion Subcommittee yesterday start-
ed President John F. Kennedy's
$2,298;000,000 program of federal
grants for public grade and high
schools toward a showdown in
Congress.
It was in about the same form
Kennedy submitted the bill. As he
urged, the message contains no
rs Roundupn
take advantage of President John
F., Kennedy's peace corps offer.
* * *
TEHRAN - Four thousand
teachers staged a sitdown dem-
onstration for more pay in front
of the Mailis (Parliament) yes-
terday, and eye witness accounts
said at least three of them were
seriously wounded ' when police
opened fire.
. «
WASHINGTON - The govern-
ment yesterday announced the re-
jection of 15 bids on more than
$1 million worth of electrical, ma-
terials on the ground they were
identical.
Four of the 19 bids submitted
were considered and contracts to-
taling $65;871 were awarded on
two of them.
"We were amazed," said Secre-
tary of the Interior Stewart L.
Udall, "at the fact that we con-
tinued to receive bids offering
identical prices."

aid for parochial and other pri-
vate schools.
Meanwhile, it appeared the move
to provide aid for private schools
in separate legislation is dead this
year. Sen. Hubert Humphrey (D-
Minn), the Democratic Senate
whip, said, the party's congres-
sional leaders have decided not to
bring up any such bill at this ses-
sion.
To Approve Soon
The subcommittee's vote sent
the three-year public school aid
measure to the full Labor and
Public Welfare Committee, which
is expected to approve it on
Thursday or early next .week.
Democratic leaders aim at
bringing the legislation up in the
Senate next week.
Greater trouble for the program
is expected in the House, where
its Education Committee still is
working on similar legislation. The
House group could delay any vote
until the Senate completes its ac-
tion.
Goldwater Opposed
Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz),
the only member of the Senate
subcommittee to vote against the
measure, said he will try to
amend it to include loans to
church and other private schools.
Unless the mood of the Senate
changes, Goldwater's move is ex-
pected to fail. Such an amend-
ment introduced by Sen. Wayne.
Morse (D-Ore) last year was beat-
en 49-37 and Morse has said he
will not support such a proposal.
this year.

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
Fidel Castro is violating Moscowj
doctrine in proclaiming Cuba a
"socialist" state in the Soviet sense
of the word.
Even under Communist rule,
Fidel has jumped the gun by years.
By Soviet doctrine he has a long
way to go before reaching what
the Soviet Communists call social-
ism. He could even be accused of,
deviationism-veering away from
party dogma.
Communist Reasoning
By Communist reasoning, it goes
this way:;
A state first must go through a;
"national liberation movement" or;
a proletarian uprising to cut its
ties with "imperialism" and reach
the stage of "dictatorship of the
proletariat."
The state then must go through
the process of "building socialism."
It took almost 40 years before the.
Union of Soviet Socialist Repub-
lics claimed to have "built social-
ism." The socialist state, by Soviet1
doctrine, is the last step before
achieving Communism, under

which the people are promised the
state apparatus will wither away
and the rule will be "to each ac-
cording to his needs, from each
according to his ability." For the
USSR, says Premier Nikita
Khrushchev, that is still a long
way off.
Only Two
Only the USSR and Czechoslo-
vakia, of all nations ruled by Com-
munism, can claim to have
achieved socialism by Communist
party standards. Hungary, Roman-
ia, Poland, Bulgria and Albania,
the European Satellites, call them-
selves "People's Democracies,"
meaning they still have not "built
socialism." Communist North Viet
Nam and North Korea call them-
selves "Democratic _ Republics,"
and Red China calls itself a
"reople's Republic." Both are years
away from the Soviet standard of
socialism.
By Red doctrine, Cuba would
have a long road to travel, both
economically and socially, before
being able to claim to have reached
the same stage of development as
the Soviet Union.

She's MUCH too nice to be forgotten! She
wouldn't even think of dropping a hint that she
hoped your gift woulld be from Collins, but deep
in her loving heart she's hoping it will be !

he
"al
he
ers
lso
he
nd
of
he
an-
de
ey
SANPDLER
OF BOSTON
A REAL GOOD FITTING PUMP
WITH A SHAPED TWO-INCH HEEL.
HIGH ENOUGH TO BE DRESSY AND
LOW ENOUGH TO'BE-COMFORTABLE.
$1395

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