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February 16, 1961 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

y 4

ence Research-Basic or Applied?

PREPARE FOR ELECTION:
Democrats Take Stands,
Attack GOP Leadership

'S NOTE: This article,
series, considers the re-
diemma-to pursue basic
arch or to work on prac-
ations.)
ALPH KAPLAN
vidual in a University.
has an idea should be
th the means of pursu-
e," William N. Hub-
dean of the' Medical
lares.
her's desire to pursue
as, as opposed to what
isidered a responsibili-
on practical projects
is a common problem
programs. This prob-
takes the form of a
ween basic research in-
those projects which
mediate practical goal,
ed research projects
with a specific prob-

encourage more basic, creative re-
search projects of this nature.
May Compete
"The University has a responsi-
bility for both applied, or practi-,
cal, research and creative, or basic,
research work. 'And while these
two types sometimes overlap there
are also times when the two ob-
jectives are competitive," Gom-
lberg commented..
He cited the cases of both types
of research interests competing
for the same area and facilities
within a laboratory as an example
of competitive objectives.
"It is especially important that
there be a proper separation of
basic and applied research in an
era in which one of the major in-
terests in a university's research
operation is a government looking
for solutions to its problems,". he
says.

his problem stems from
at sponsored research
nts -from agencies out-
rniversty-tend to be
for specific projects, or
arch.
ange Policies
notes, however, that
Les as the Ford Foun-
the National Science,
are beginning to rec--
need for more grants'
ons and fewer grants
projects. ,
lawyer, vice-president
z, cited figures showing
ity spends about $450,-
y for research projects
d with approximately
spent annually by out-
es on University re-}
$450,000 is made up
funds and endowment
ng $350,000 and grants
Phoenix Project of
>1e of the problems in-
getting support for a
ch project is the case
lald Glaser of the Uni-
alifornia's physics de-
nd winner of the 1960
for physics.
fused Support
ser finally received an
it of $750 from the
ject in 1952 after his
;uclear "bubble-chain-
been refused support
al other agencies, in-
Atomic Energy Com-
Gomberg, director of
: Project, asserts, "the
has a responsibility to

Wrong Tendency
Prof. Gomberg also is concerned
about the tendency of some re-
earch projects to emphasize group,
rather than individual, research
efforts.
"The fundamental inescapable
principle is that new ideas are cre-
ated one at a time by individuals.
They are not related to develop-
mental or applied science; they are
not related to group research pro-
grams," he notes.
Joseph A. Boyd, director of the
Institute of Science and Technol-
>gy, says most University research-
ers are interested in both pure
and applied research.
Cit Grants Three
Liuor Licenses
The Ann Arbor City Council
has approved class C liquor-by-
the-glass license applications sub-
mitted by three local establish-
ments. The three establishments
are the Colonial Lanes Bowling
Alley, the Rubaiyat Restaurant
and the Court Tavern.

"Most University researchers
are working on both types of proj-
ects because it is the University's
purpose both to advance knowl-
edge with pure research and to
develop processes, techniques and
devices by engineering research,"
Boyd said.
"In recent years, although there
has been a great increase in both,
there has been an emphasis, if
not more work, on pure research.
"The ultimately desired goal is
a situation in which researchers
of demonstrated ability and com-
petence have unrestricted freedom
to pursue projects of their own in-
terest.
"This is not presently the case,"
Boyd said.
"Although the engineering col-
lege is the branch -of the Uni-
versity's research operation most
concerned with applied research,
the school's program is not mere-
ly devoted to problem solving,"
Prof. Glenn V. Edmonson, associ-
ate dean, explains. "It is geared to'
the needs of both students and
faculty and is a combination of
teaching and research."
Plan Dialogue
On Religions
The Rev. Dr. Martin E. Marty,
Asociate editor of "The Christian
Century," and the Rev. Fr. Gus-
tave Weigel, S.J., professor of
theology at Woodstock College,
will participate in a "Theological
Dialogue: Protestant and Roman
Catholic," under the auspices of
the Office of Religious Affairs, at
4:15 p.m. today in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
"The Christian Century"' is a
Protestant theological and discus-
sion magazine. Father Weigel, a
Jesuit, will take the Catholic side
of the talks.

He notes that, although there is
less basic research in the engi-
neering college than in other areas
of University research, there is
still some. For instance, solid-state
physics research is an example of
research based solely on a desire
to understand why a material be-
haves in certain ways.
IQC Elections
Of Officers'
Se t f or Today
Inter-Quadrangle Council will
elect officers tonight with only
one slate of candidates vying for
the open posts.
Thomas Moch, '61, South Quad-
rangle president, will seek a one
year term as IQC president. Ro-
bert Geary, '63E, the vice presi-
dential nominee, and Roger Pfeuf-
fer, '64, the aspirant for secretary-
treasurer, round out Moch's slate.
Each residence house within IQC
will cast a secret ballot. IPC elec-
tions call for the naming of a
slate of officers, rather than selec-
tions of individual posts.
Moch said he would like IPC to
explore the possibility of summer
storage within the quadrangles
for students planning to teturn in
the fall. He also suggested that
the council might sponsor a dance
similar in structure and date to
the J-Hop.
Haugh To Lecture
On East Africa
Prof. Robert F. Haugh of the
English department will lecture
and conduct a panel discussion
of East African Federations at 8
p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 3B of the
Michigan Union. The lecture is the
frist in a series sponsored by the
African Student's Union.

Ann Arbor Democrats have
sounded the battle cry for the
city's spring elections with a gen-
eral attack on "timorous, petty,
and ineffective" Republican lead-
ership, and a far-reaching pro-
gram of their own.
In the area of discrimination,
the platform adopted Tuesday by
the city party committee calls for
a more vigorous Human Relations
Commission, "open occupancy"
practices in the rental and sale of
housing, and provision of equal
employment opportunities for all
groups.
The party advocated coopera-
tion with the University in its in-
tegration of central and north
campuses "by imaginative-utiliza-
tion of the Huron River Valley."
A new proposal pledged activity
to meet "the needs and hopes" of
Ann Arbor's older citizens.
The Democratic party also wants
a conference on community goals
so that "the direction in which
our city is, and should be moving"
can be established.
Speaking on state policies, the
party urged local support of a
constitutional convention, and a
revision of the state's tax program

based on a personal income tax
and a corporate profits tax.
Other platform planks for the
city included: rehabilitation of
"deteriorating residential and
downtown areas," stopping the
"flight of business" from the city,
housing proj ects for senior ,citi-
zens and quickadoption of the
new zoning ordinance.
The Democrats also endorsed
the controversial "Rule 9" of state
realtors which is intended to end
racial discrimination.
YRs "To Hear
Talk on Labor
Prof. W. Allen Spivey of the
business school will address an
open meeting of oung Repub-
lican Club at 7:30 p.m., today in
Rm. 3N of the Michigan Union on
"Labor and Economic Problems."
This is the first of a three part
series colloquia dealing with na-
tional issues. The remaining two
programs will deal with foreign
affairs and civil rights respec-
tively.

Pollack Set
To Lecture
On Medicine
Jerome Pollack, program con-
sultant to the social security de-
partment, United Automobile.
Workers, will deliver this years
Canfield Memorial Lecture in the
fifth floor amphitheatre of the
Medical Sciences Building at 8:00
p.m. tonight.
Pollack's talk, entitled "Intensi-
fying Social Forces in American
Medicine," will range over such
topics as the rising cost of health
care, recent changes in the volume
and standards of care, voluntary
prepayment plans, health care
for the aged, the influences exer-
cised by insurers over medical
practice, role of government and
private agencies.
Pollack has represented labor in
retirement and medical programs
for 19 years. His talk will be a
departure from the technical lec-
tures which are a Canfield tradi-
tion.

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SPECIAL PREVIEW SCENES
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"THE FLOWERING PEACH"

I

CULTURE ISOLATED, BUT WESTERN:
Characterizes Finnish Drama

Gulick

'l

ive Tals
xlick, president of the
Public Administra-
ork, has been chosen
annual William Cook
the year, the Law
announced.
U present a series of
"The Metropolitan
' American Govern-
y" at 4:15 p.m. daily
-10 in Rackham Lec-
11 the lectures will be
public.

By MICHAEL HARRAH
Mrs. Ritva Heikkila, drama as-
sistant with the Finish National
Theatre in Helsinki characterized
"a very- real spirit" that the Finns'
have created around the theatre,
as she spoke before an afternoon
audience Tuesday.
"For 800 years, Finland was a
part of the Swedish empire, and
then another 100 years a part of
Russia. Thus they have been iso-,
lated from the West but still a
part of it," she said.
"And because Finland has been
a country of little material wealth,
it is good that they have been able
.to contribute to the Western cul-
ture."
t ,Tours Colleges
Mrs. Heikkila, who Is touring
some 30 colleges and universities
in the United States, sponsored by
the Finnish-American Society, the
Finnish National Theatre, the
State Department and the Ameri-
can Theatre Society, supplement-
ed her talk with slides depicting
various scenes from the plays that
the Finnish National Theatre per-
forms and shots of the theatre
building.
Among the plays seen on the
slides were "Le Cid," Checkhov's
"The Seagull," Sheridan's "School
for Scandal" and Gibson's "Two
for the Seesaw," all of which have
been translated into Finnish.
Government Drama
Mrs. Heikkila said that there
are no commercial theatres in

Finland, all professional drama
being sponsored by the govern-
ment.
"Theatre is very much loved,"
she said. 'It is often called the
'national art,' and it is considered
to be like the symphony or the
art museum,"
Mrs. Heikkila described the
Finns as being very theatre-
conscious and said that there are
some 8,000 amateur groups in the
country, whose population is four
and a half million.

"There are some 30 professional
theatres throughout Finland," she
said. "This means that any city
of 20,000 population probably
boasts a large professional theatre.
Mrs. Heikkila said that the Fin-
nish National Theatre was the
oldest and the largest group in
Finland, founded in 1812. Their
present quarters, very grand and
stately, were erected in 1902, with
a modernistic addition for experi-
mental performances completed in
1954.
"Many are surprised that the
state supports theatre in my coun-
try," she said. "Because Finns
consider theatre such an impor-
tant art, the government supports
it since it cannot pay its own way."
More Than Entertainment
She pointed out that the theatre
represented more than just enter-
tainment. "It is an opportunity to
see something we can talk about
and learn from."
Mrs. Heikkila said that she en-
visioned a theatre exchange pro-
gram for communication among
the various countries of the West.
"Theatre is much like 'Kalevala,'
the Finnish national epic, whose
hero is portrayed not with a
sword but a song.
"I see all the enthusiasm and
the creativity here in American
theatres that I see at home. It
seems to me that we are one com-
mon people, and theatre can be a
very vital part of our communica-
tion."

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ERMANYITALY-AUSTRIA4RANCE
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