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April 28, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 28,

L YV

Critie Views
Visual Puns
In Painting
By GERALD STORCH
Visual "puns and abbreviations"
in modern art represent a con-
stant effort to move away from
the materialism of society, Satur-
lay, Review art critic Mrs. Catha-
rine Kuh said yesterday in a lec-1
ture sponsored by the art depart-
ment and the University Art
Museum.
A pun is an object or image
which looks like one thing, means
that same thing at first, but takes
on many more and different as-
pects the longer the viewer stu-
dies the picture.
Thus artists who use puns in
their works are more concerned
with what their drawings reflect
than what they actually show.
Short-hand Techniques
"Abbreviations,' Mrs. Kuh con-
tinued, "are short-hand techni-
ques which show only part of
the total image. An example would
be drawing a blurred head and
arm to represent a tortured mind
and body.
These two provocative aspects
of modern art have actually been
used since art began, but the ad-
vent of Freud andnscientific ad-
vances have brought these artis-
tic utilizations to a more signifi-
cant position.
Just as mechanical develop-
ments and scientific instruments,
such as microscopes, have reduced
material life to a broken series of
stages, artists use broken forms to
symbolize their unconscious and
conscious attempts to escape from
materialism, and thus dominate
their surroundings.
Interested in Processes
'They are more interested in
processes than things themselves,
in ideas than facts," Mrs. Kuh
said.
"People now have different hid-
den connotations on everyday ob-
jects, and puns and abbreviations
try to shock the art viewer into
looking -at things differently."
SGC Delays
Consideration
Of -Conun~ittee

Union President Issues Policy Statement

(EDITOR'S NOTE-The following1
is a statement by Union President
Paul C. Carder, 162, setting forthl
the Union's policy goals, and ex-S
plaining some of its actions in re-
gard to the use and purpose of its
facilities.)
The Michigan Union would like
to state the facts concerning some;
of its past and present actions
and future goals in regard to the
use and purpose of Union facilities.
The Special Committee of the
Union Board of Directors was set;
up to investigate the use and
condition of all Union facilities.
Also, it was empowered to experi-
ment with possible solutions to
any problems that might arise
from the investigation. This was
done in January, 1961..
Since that time the Committee
has been meeting regularly, and.
is now progressing on two fronts:
1) a survey is being conducted to
determine the attitudes and opin-
ions of students, faculty, admin-
istration and alumni about all
the Union's services and facilities.
2) While the survey is in pro-
gress, the Committee has been
divided into sub-committees to
further look into the areas of:
regulations, food services, per-
sonnel, patterns of use, and phys-
ical facilities.
Facilities Listed
These facilities are: hotel ac-
commodations, swimming pool,
bowling alley, MUG and cafeteria,
Dining room, main desk, billiard
room, and music rooms.
The Survey
The ultimate purpose of the sur-
vey is to aid Union administrators
in achieving their aims of serving
the campus community in the best
possible manner. More specifically,

the objective is to determine somel
priority in the changes, additions,E
and improvements of the Union
that may be warranted.
In short, students, this survey
is for you. In short, faculty, thisj
survey is for you. In short, ad-
ministrators, this survey is forj
you. In short, alumni, this survey4
is for you. We want all of you to
use the Union; we hope that the1
survey will give you an opportunity'
to tell us what we can do for
YOU.
The facts concerning the estab-
lishment of the survey are as
follows:
Special Committee1
1) The decision to conduct the
survey was made by the ten mem-
ber Special Committee in Feb-1
ruary, 1961. At that time the
Committee was composed of the
following men: Dr. Lionel Laing,
Professor of Political Science,
Chairman; Mr. John Tirrell, Gen-
eral Secretary of the Alumni As-
sociation; Dean of Men, Walter
B. Rea; Gayle King, '61E. and
John Tuohy, '62, student
board members; Dr. James A.
Lewis, Vice-President for Student
Affairs; Dr. James A. Shortt,
Supervisor of State Services; Perry
Morton, John Ross, and Michael
Turoff, then Executive Officers of
the Union.
2) The Committee requested that
the then Executive Officers direct
the survey in conjunction with
professional surveyconsultants.
This request was made about two
or three weeks prior to the ex-
piration of their terms of office.
These three men accepted, having
received no offer of compensation.

Payment was never discussed
either in the Special Committee or
in the Finance Committee of the
Board of Directors while these men
were ,present.
Nor did the past Executive Of-
ficers ever participate in any vote
appointing themselves to their
present positions. Nor did they
ever campaign to obtain these
positions. Upon the expiration of
their terms of office these men
were removed from the committee
at their request.
Honorarium
3) About a week after, the past
officers had begun work on the
survey. One of the members of
the Special Committee informed
them that the Board of Directors
had decided to give each of the
Survey Directors an honorarium at
the completion of their work.
4) The survey of student opinion
is now in progress. The question-
naire which our professional con-
sultants deemed acceptable is be-
ing given to 461 students. These
students were chosen at random in
accord with scientific techniques
from the register of all students
of the University.
The questionnaire, composed of
both objective and subjective por-
tions, is being administered by 23
student interviewers employed on
a salary basis by the Union.
Other Action
Regarding the Union Special
Committee's experimental policies
about the installation of a juke
box in the MUG and the exclusion
of cards, chess, and checkers from
the MUG:
The Union wishes to repeat

that this Committee is em-
powered to experiment with
different means of improving
the use of the Union's services
and facilities, not only in the
MUG but also throughout the
Union. Experimentation does
not connote irrevocability!
The Union wishes to point out
that the juke box is audible for
the most part only in the north
section of the cafeteria. For those
who dislike the music at mealtime,
anytime, or all the time (and the
Union does not criticize these pref-
erences), they may sit in the other
two sections of the cafeteria. If
the juke box is deemed to be de-
sired by the patrons, partitions
will be built to more completely
localize the music.
Other Facilities
Also, in lieu of offering cards,
chess, and checker facilities in the
MUG, the Union has provided
such facilities in quiet, well-lighted
and comfortable sections of the
lobby.
The Union would like to point
out that in its constitution, ap-
proved by the Board of Regents,
all members of the Union includ-
ing life members are entitled to
vote in a referendum. Life mem-
bers are directly affected by any
Union policy in as much as they
havecontributed to making the
Union what it is today.
The Union wants the opinions
of everyone, but, being a mem-
bership organization it is apparent
that the voting procedure is pro-
per and equitable. Changes in

Union policy can be affected by
consultation and mutual discus-
sion. Referenda affect only con-
stitutional provision.
For example, in the last all-
campus election, changes broaden-
ing the base of representation on
the Board were ratified. However,
matters of operational policy are
exclusively within the province of
the representative Board of Direc-
tors to which members are elected
each year.
Advancement Criteria
As is common in many campus
organizations, merit and ability
are the criteria for advancement
in position. The Union disregards
personal affiliations or any other
artificial criteria in its process of
selection for advancement.
Communication on a campus of
this size is a great problem. The
Union is, and has always been,
straight-forward in its dissemina-
tion of information regarding its
actions. Information is subject to
misinterpretation when communi-
cation channels are weak, and un-
fortunately this has happened in
the recent past.
Regarding these channels of
communication, the Union be-
lieves that disorder is ineffective
in accomplishing the aims of in-
terested persons. Furthermore,
personal attacks are irresponsible
and inexcusable.
It has been the Union's aim to
better inform you about Union
policies and actions. The Union
looks forward to serving you in
the best possible manner.

i

IL

p

Student Government' Council
Wednesday.night postponed action
concerning its committee on mem-
bership selection until the com-
mittee submits its semester re-
port.
Arthur Rosenbaum, '62, had
presented before 'the Council a
motion asking the committee to
consider non-voting participation
by the presidents of Inter-Frater-,
nity Council and Panhellenic As-
sociation in "all meetings of the
committee when these meetings
pertain to either fraternities or
sororities."
The motion asked the same
speaking privileges be given to
the two Council ex-officios as are
accorded members of the commit-
tee.
Also postponed was a commit-
tee of the whole discussion of the
peace corps.
SGC did, however, pass an
amended motion by Hanson that
the committee planning the Coun-
cil's upcoming showing of "Oper-
ation Abolition" consider having
Richard Nohl, '61, SGC president,
moderate the pro - con debate
scheduled to follow.
Wentzel To Give
Astronomy Talk
The astronomy department vis-
itors' night will feature a speech
by Donat G. Wentzel of the astron-
omy department on "The Sun" at
8 p.m. today in Rm. 2003 Angell

Asks Panhel
Election Probe
Susan Stillerman, '62, president
of Panhellenic Association, pro-
posed at a Panhel meeting yes-
terday that a suggestion be made
to the Executive Council to form a
committee to evaluate this year's
Panhel election procedure.
The committee would be com-
posed of five or six women, whose
Job it would be to compile the
opinions of affiliated women con-
cerning the election.
Group To Discuss
Cuban Revolution
There. will be a discussion on
"Cuba and the Counter-Revolu-
tion" at 8 p.m. tonight in the
Multi-Purpose Rm. of the Under-
graduate Library.
The program will include Prof.
Samuel Shapiro of Michigan State
University and Edward Shaw, the
midwest representative of the Na-
tional Fair Play for Cuba Com-
mittee.
Center Announces
Peace Corps Skit
The International Center will
present a stage show entitled,
"The Peace Corps Goes Abroad,"
at 8 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud.
Tickets will be sold at the door.
NOW OPEN
FOR
LUNCH

BIG-TIME'WRESTLING,
at Ann Arbor High
FRIDAY, APRIL 28 ... 8:00 P.M.
FEATURE BOUT:
RICKY "The Crusher" CORTEZ
vS
DICK "Mr. Michigan" GARZA
plus THREE OTHER BOUTS, including a tag team match

DIAL NO 2-6264
2ND BIG
WAN,,WEEK
MLUMMA PCTURES PRESENTS A MR

Shows at 1:00
3:35 - 6:20 and 9:10
Features at 1 :00 -
3:45 - 6:30 and 9:15

i

I

II

SPECIAL
SUBSCRIPTION RECORDING
First Concert CONTEMPORARY MUSIC FESTIVAL
Presented in Hill Auditorium, Fri., April 14
* *
STRAVINSKY . . . Symphony of Psalms
University Choir and Orchestra
Joseph Blatt, Conductor
DALLAPICCOLA .. . Songs of Captivity
Michigan Singers and U. Orchestra
Maynard Klein, Conductor
One LP record with pictures of performers
on record sleeve.
* * *
Orders must be given and paid in advance
for the privilege of obtaining this special
subscription recording of SELDOM HEARD
MUSIC.
Special Subscription price $3.00
Orders being taken Week of April 23.
LANE HALL Room 130

I

ROA VICTOR RECORDS ANNOUNCES
An =UK AT -niU I PU9CE
WHEN YOU BUY ONE IN SAME
PRICE RANGE AT REGULAR PRICE*
FROM THE ENTIRE CATALOG OF
CR005THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS
"at both stores"
,RCAVICTOR.OPERA
at FANTASTIC SAVINGS

was
Puccini TURANDOT*
Bjoerling, Tebaldi, Nilsen $14.98
Verdi AIDA
Bjoerling, Milanov .....$14.98
Verdi IL TROVATORE*
Warran, Tucker, Price . .$14.98
Puccini MADAMA BUTTERFLY*
Moffo, Valetti ........$14.98

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NOW

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DIAL
NO 5-6290

I"A JOLLY SHOW INDEED:"
-Time Magazine
"THE YEAR'S FUNNIEST
BRITISH FELONY"
-Znser, Cue Magazine
"BROAD AS IS THE CLEAVAGE
BETWEEN TERRY-THOMAS'
TWO FRONT TEETH, JUST
THAT BROAD IS THE HUMOR J
IN HIS NEW BRITISH
FARCE I" -Crowth.r,
"MADCAP, DELIGHTFUL
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BOUNTIFUL SOURCE
OF HAPPINESS I"
-Cook,.World Telegram & Sun

Puccini LA BOHEME
Albanese, Peerce, Merrill,
Toscanini ............$9.98
Verdi RIGOLETTO
Warren, Berger, Peerce . .- $9.98
Verdi REQUIEM
Toscanini, Distefano, Siepi $9.98
BerliozR EQUIEM*
Munch & Boston Symph. $1 1.98

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508 E. William

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Mozart
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I

ALL
EL RECORDS

STEREO and HI F0

IF
TNEYIE ALL
That "Shaggy Dog" guy cracks through the
laugh barrier with flubber (the goo that flew)
...The faculty was dumb-founded,
the co-eds cheered...
His fliwer ,
went into
orbit
Q and the
t ~Pentagono
% - ~a Panic!
wi i went into
's I
* 4
I ,f""
00" ::r: t "#<::
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STARTING
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DIAL
NO 8-6416
Shows Today
at 7 - 9 P.M.

ALSO AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR PRICES
MASKED BALL PAGLIACCI
BARBER OF SEVILLE* OTHELLO
FORZA DEL DESTINO* FALSTAFF
MACBETH* LA TRAVIATA
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MANON LESCAUT LA GIOCONDA*
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AND MANY MORE
*Stereo slightly higher
DISC SHOP Tl CENTER
1210 $. University 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

I

12 price

_

when you buy a second Angel LP at the same list price.
Complete Catalogue Including:

*
S.G.C. inmaquild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9:00
STEINBECK'S PUDHOVKIN'S
OF MICE AND MEN The End of St. Petersberg
Pudhoukin' sFilm of the Russian Revolution

Schwartzkopf Eileen Far
Callas Pablo Cas
Von Karajan Schnabel
Soviet Army Chorus Klemperer

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als

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