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April 23, 1961 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

G EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 1961

I EIGHT THE MICBIGAN DAILY SUNI)AY, APRIL 13, 1051

few Spring Purses Are Bigger;
Vomen Find Extra Space Helpful

Wediquette Displays Spring Dress Fashions

By LINDAPERSHING
In the spring, a young girl's
ncy turns lightly to thoughts of
. a new spring purse!
Away with those old, small, dark
ether clutch bags. Now's the
ne to try a bright, beautiful,
g, big new purse. If you thought
ey were unusual last year, you
ould see them now. They're wid-
deeper, longer, lighter, bright-
more varied and more weird
an ever.
Last year's large purse was the
e of a cosmetic case--about 15
ches by 15 inches by 5 inches,
ade of such common fabrics as
ather, patent leather, straw, and

here and there, a few avant-garde
burlaps. It was decorated with a
few conservative flowers, or sea
shells. This year, purses are made
of everything: bamboo, brocade,
ostrich skin, burlap and mattress
ticking.
. Flowers, Shells
The few conservative flowers and
sea shells of last year have now
become flower, vegetable or fruit
gardens, or undersea scenes com-
plete with seaweed squids, star-
fish, lobsters and clams; and they
are big. They are huge, or as one
horrified male whispered, "They're
monstrous."

Going by the names of "Carry-
All," or "Hold Everything," their
average size is that of a small suit-
case, or even a large one. They're
no longer simply square or round,
satchel or birdcage. Their forms
are, as they say about modern art,
"abstract." They have twice as
many secret compartments, zip-
per compartments, and more
buckled pouches on the outside
(really extra attached pocket-
books) than last year.
Why So Big?
Why so big? Who would bother
lugging around a creation that
size anyway? As one saleslady in
a downtown store said, "It's wom-
en working that started it. A wom-
an who works all day needs things
that'll keep her presentable. Very
often a woman takes her lunch in
her purse, and sometimes an ex-
tra pair of shoes, too."
What do they put in them to
take up all this space? Stan Fre-
berg's Little Blue Riding Hood
very innocently had a sawed-off
shotgun, knife, bludgeon, and a
box of dum-dum shells in her
goodie basket.
Aside from the run-of-the-mill
keys, glasses,, wallets, combs and
brushes, these modern day goodie
baskets hold cologne, shampoo,
can-openers, knitting needles,
pocket radios, contact-lens wet-
ting solution, an evening's clothes,
groceries, a sewing basket, a shoe-
shine kit or two, and any odd bits
of string, material, shoe leather, or
old auto parts that might some-
day be convenient.
Informed sources say that some
of these purses are so big that
their manufacturers equip them
with little wheels and a leash to
drag them around. Although the
Ann Arbor stores don't seem to
carry this particular type purse,
they have just about everything
else.

WEDIQUETTE FASHIONS -- These three fashions are examples of "rood trousseau material" picked from the many styles shown at Wediquette produced by the
Special Projects Committee of the Women's League April 13. The show was designed to help girls make the all-important decision on clothes for their trousseaus,
china, silver, linens, and other household goods. On the left is floor-length white silk wedding gown. It has a graceful, sweeping skirt and a lace-trimmed bodice. The
center is a bridesmaid's dress of pale yellow silk organza and the left a version of the all-purpose classic shirtwaist.

-Fred Shippey
LITTLE LUGGAGE-A cute co-ed sits surrounded by an array of
purses that have nothing in common but their stylish enormity.
These bags, which are available in many materials, and in even
more shapes and patterns, could revolutionize the trucking in-
dustry.

- M i

New Designs
Now Feature
New Fabrics
By GLORIA BOWLES
The days when winter clothes
were always wool, and summer
ones only cotton or linen are long
since gone, and this year's new
fabrics feature textures, simu-
lated texture prints and, most of
all, brilliant colors.
Style-conscious Michigan co-eds
will be turning up in three unusual
fabrics this spring, all with practi-
cal disadvantages and impractical
delights.
To scratch is a woman's peroga-
tive when she wears burlap. It is
slated to play a starring role this
spring featured in short peasant
skirts with huge side pockets and
in brightly colored jumpers and
dresses.
Prints are also being transferred
to burlap in little jackets to wear
atop suit skirts or spring sheaths.
Probably a little more comfort-
able because it's just a little less
coarse is denim. It is appearing in
skirts, shirts, bermudas and cu-
lottes.
Madras, of course, may renew
its monopoly on campus togs this
year. With its subtle colors, seen
in raincoats, blouses, skirts, ber-
mudas, slacks and even belts,
Madras is turning into a perennial
favorite. Despite its bleeding quali-
ties (and subsequent laundering
problems), collegans insist that
there is no plaid like a Madras
plaid, and wear volumes of it with
impunity.
The traditional spring fabrics
are popular once more. Linen and
silk, in lovely colors, are being
featured in before-five and shortly
after six dresses.
Lace, chiffon, peau de soie, silk
taffeta-the old standbys in for-
mal fabrics year-round-are be-
ing shown in pale colors for spring.
The latest for evening wear, how-
ever, is remure eyelet - starchy,
lacy and snowy white.
Gauzy-prints in organza, or-
gandie and. dotted swiss were es-
pecially designed for this summer'~
purely frivolous dresses. Cotton
knits are making news, too, in
bathing suits, sportswear and even
coats.
Wool has not been neglected in
at the talk about this spring's
light-weight materials. Cool eve-
nings call for light wool suits in
spring shades and skirts in pastel
plaids-but only while the cold
spell lasts !
Nor have feet been neglected in
this rash of new fashion fabrics.
Sneakers need no longer be white
cotton-the latestis a spongy
brushed nylon tennis shoe. t

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Who wants to
cart all that -stuff
home?
CALL GREENE'S for a Handi-Hamper. Fill it at your
leisure - leave it for summer storage and get your
garments all fresh and clean when you get back next
fall.
USE THAT EXTRA ROOM to give people rides,
split the cost of gas and pay for your storage box
that way. It isn't expensive, just regular cost of clean-
ing and $4.95 for storage and insurance.

Greene's way
makes going, home
a cinch!j
JUST CALL GREENE'S for one of those fabulous
Handi-Hampers. Pack all the clothes you won't wear
until fall-Clothes you would ordinarily pack up, take
home, have cleaned, pack up again and bring back
in the fall.
NOW, ALL YOU NEED TO DO is turn the Hamper
over to Greene's. They clean the lot at regular clean-
ing prices and store it in a refrigerated moth-proof
vault. When you return in the fall, call Greene's
again, your clothes will be taken out of the vault,
returned to you freshly pressed on hangers and
packed in neat polyethylene bags, ready for your
clothes closet.

_-

r i

CALL NORMANDY 23-23-1 OR STOP AT ANY GREENE'S PLANT
FOR INFORMATION

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.
216 W. William Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
Telephone NO 8-8014

FIVE CONVENIENT PLANTS:

g

campus

main plant

I II

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