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April 22, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T'"E MICHIGAN DAILY

ian Leader Sees

MOSCOW MP)-Former Laotian
Premier Souvanna Phouma, a self-
exiled neutralist, said yesterday
he will return to his' country
Tuesday or Wednesday, "which
will coincide with the start of a
cease-fire" in Laos.
Britain and the Soviet Union
were , expected to issue a joint
eease-fire appeal within 48 hours
but Souvanna's statement was the
strongest indication yet that East
and West had decided on a date
for calling a halt to fighting in
the Southeast Asian kingdom.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
A. Gromyko told diplomats a
compromise had been reached on
the sequence of a cease-fire and
a peace conference, which made'
it possible to publish a truce ap-
peal.
(The West always has insisted
publicly that a verified cease-
fire precede international nego-
tiations. Diplomatic sources in
London said arrangements for a
joint cease-fire appeal were almost
completely buttoned up.)
Souvanna, though he has lived
in Cambodia since fleeing Vien-
tiane in December 1900, has been
a central figure in moves to end
the Laotian civil war.
He is recognized by the pro-
Communist Patlet Lao rebels and
the Communist bloc as Lao's le-
gal head of government.
He said"- in an interview yester-
day he will spend two or three
days in Laos, adding: "During
that time I believe aneffective
government can be created."
Souvanna said he did not know
whether he would be Premier in
a government of national union
thus created and declined to spec-
ulate on which parties would get
which cabinet posts.
Manila Force,
U.S. Troops
On Laos "Alert
MANILA (A-The Manila Bul-
letin said yesterday the Philip-
pine army has been placed on com-
bat alert "for possible overseas
action with Southeast Asia Treaty
Organizatign forces in strife torn
Laos."
Quoting informed sources the
newspaper said the alert followed
a similar order given United States
far-east forces.
X-15 Flight Sets
New Speed Mark
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE
(P)--Maj. Bob White flew the X-15
rocket plane to a new controlled
flight speed record of 3,140 miles
an hour today, despite engine
trouble and a leak in his pressur-
ized cabin.

newsman. .

REDS HAIL DEFEAT:

Allries,''Others. on Cuba:*
S. eSlippi
LONDON (P) - European newspapers warned yesterday that
United States prestige has slipped badly on the Cuban crisis but
applauded President John F. Kennedy's assertion that Cuba will not
be surrendered to Communism.Y
The Kennedy statement also won support in Latin America.
The Iron Curtain press drummed away at the theme"the Castro
regime has handed "American imperialism" a disastrous defeat.
Italians Comment
Milan's independent newspaper Corriere Della Sera, one of
Italy's most influential, set the pace for those who warned United
States stature is. suffering: "In '

As R
Committee
Gives OAS
,jurisdietion
Rebels Say 500-1500
En Rout to Cuba
UNITED NATIONS (W) - The
United Nations political commit-
tee yesterday overrode Soviet and
Cuban objections and assigned to
Latin American nations the chief
role of peacemaker between Cuba
and the United States,
Meanwhile, Cuban exiles in
Miami said additional guerrillas
were on their way toward Cuba.
They claimed that between 500
and 1,500 fresh troops were en
route to take part in operations
against Castro.
Radio Swan, an anti-Castro
voice broadcasting from off the
CentralAmerican coast, said small
landings had taken place on the
Cuban coast, but the report was
not confirmed.
By a vote of 61 to 27 with 10
abstentions the UN committee ap-
proved -a resolution sponsored by
seven Latin American nations giv-
ing the Organization of American
States the primary responsibility
for trying to resolve United States-
Cuban differences.
The committee approved by a
narrow margin a Mexican resolu-
tion which would call on all
countries to bar use of their ter-
ritories and supplies for anti-Cas-
tro forces. The vote on the United
States-opposed resolution was 42-
31 with 25 abstentions - not
enough for the two-thirds major-
ity required for General Assem-
bly approval. :
The committee had been locked
in bitter debate since Monday on
the Cuban question. Many dele-
gates-especially from the Asian-
African countries-said there was
no doubt that the invaders had
material U.S. support.
Objections End
Band Concerts
The University band's tour has
been cancelled in Bulgaria and a
concert scheduled in Alexandria,
Egypt postponed due to govern-
mental objections.
"We were warned that Iron Cur-
tain countries might cancel out
at any time," James D. Shortt,
Supervisor of State Services, said.
.To offset the-cancellatons, the
band's tour was lengthened in
countries which had requested en-
core performances.
"Although there were some anti-
American demonstrations in Alex-
andria, these were mostly by col-
lege students and did not reflect
the sentiments of the people,"
Shortt added.
Prepare To Aid
Canadians in Cuba
OTTAWA (7)-Planes were re-
ported standing by in Montreal

and Toronto today in case emer-
gency evacuations of Canadians'
from Cuba should become neces-
sary.

nit IF
e'bels.

See

AT NEWS CONFERENCE:
Kennedy Tells of Peace Corps Project

WASHINGTON (-) - President
John F. Kennedy announced at
a news conference yesterday the
Peace Corps is undertaking its
first project in Tanganyika, an
African country which gained its
independence last Dec. 28.
Kennedy said the Peace Corps
which he has set up by executive
order was asked by the Tangan-
yikan government to send a par-
ty of surveyors, geologists and
civil engineers to map and build
roads.
He said 20 surveyors, four geol-
ogists and four civil engineers will
provide some of the skills needed.
Need Roads
"There is nothing more impor-
tant in Tanganyika than the de-
velopment of roads to open up
the country and I am more than.
delighted that some Americans

have volunteered to help in this
important -effort," Kennedy said.
Kennedy also announced that
the United States has offered
concrete backing for a broad-
scale United Nations attack on
world hunger.
The1 President said he has in-
structed the Food for Peace direc-
tor to offer $40 million in food
commodities toward an initial UN
stockpile of $100 million.
Kennedy said he is informed
that other UN members will make
similar contributions to a program
to be administered by the UN Food
and Agricultural Agency.
Complements Aid
"Our participation in this proj-
ect will complement rather than
diminish our existing Food for
Peace program," Kennedy said.,

On another subject, the Presi-
dent quashed attempts by re-
porters at the news conference to
draw him out on the Cuban cris-
is.
He bore down instead on a dec-
ade of difficulties ahead in com-
batting Communist guerrilla tac-
tics around the world-and in
trying to rocket to the moon ahead'
of the Russians.
Lyndon Johnson
Kepnedy said he is considering
dispaching Vice-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson to Southeast
Asia. He said, too, that "we con-
tinue to be hopeful" for a cease-
fire in Laos.
Shifting his sights to Geneva,
the President took a more pessi-
mistic view. He said that "we are,
of course, very discouraged" by

Soviet insistence on a ve
policing any nuclear weapon
ban.
But he said the talks E
continue, because their f
would bring on "a proliferat
atomic testing in other coun
On Cuba, the President
stood pat on the tough lar
he used in a speech Thursd
the American Society of
paper Editors. He told the e
that the United States,
alone if need be, will thrc
power against any mer
Communist infestation o:
Western Hemisphere.
Sander Vanocur of the Na
Broadcasting Co. said ther
been a "clamming up" of
mation on the foreign policy
sion.

ebuffs

Castro

New

Attac

COMEl

-ro

CHURC
~AB BrAT Hr

one day American prestige col-
lapses lower than in eight years
of Eisenhower timidity and lack of
determination."
In Paris, the respected indepen-
dent newspaper Le -Monde was
sharply critical of Kennedy:.
Kennedy says with tranquility that
if the Organization of American
States does not face up to its duty
-which is to maintain the capi-
talistic systen throughout the
western hemisphere-he will do it
all by himself."
In Latin America, strong sup-
port was voiced for Kennedy's
warning to the Communists.
Munoz Speaks,
Gov. Luis Munoz Marinof Puer-
to Rico declared the nations of the;
new world are obliged to "act"
whenever the Communist menace
penetrates as "a political force"
into any part of the western hem-
isphere.
The independent Jornal De
Brasil in'Rionde Janeiro warned
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro he "cannot count on the So-
viet Union or the millions of
Chinese that Prime Minister Chou
En-Lai promised."h d
Japanese newspapers hailed
Kennedy's speech but expressed
hope the United States would seek
a democratic solution that would
prevent full-scale war.
African nationalist organiza-
tions in Cairo condemned the
United States for what they called
"direct aggression on Cuba." They
charged rebel leaders operated in
Washington and their men trained
in Miami and Guatemala.

Say Errors
Hurt Rebels
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (M)
-- Bitter underground sources
charged yesterday anti-Castro
elements botched their invasion
by not providing proper air sup-
port and by failing to seize local
radio stations and rally the mass-
es.
The invaders made no effort to
capture local radio stations, he
said, and this, coupled with mass
arrests, left the people who might
have risen against the Castro re-
gime leaderless and bewildered.
Rebels who managed to hole up
Oriente province are complaining
their air support was too little and
too old, he added.
Army Missile
Passes Tests
At Cantaveral
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (R) -
The army's Pershing missile pass-
ed its longest, most significant
flight test yesterday and exceeded
the range of the Redstone rocket
it is slated to replace.
The swift, 34-foot Pershing,
powered for the first time by
higher'performance motors and
fuel, raced 250 miles down the
Atlantic tracking range-surpas-
sing by about 25 miles the maxi-
mum reach of the Redstone, this
nation's first ballistic missile now
deployed with NATO forces.
The missile is being developed as
a mobile field weapon with a
selective range of 50 to 700 miles.
The army plans to start stationing
it in Europe next year, gradually
replacing the more cumbersomeI
liquid-fuel Redstone.
Ulbright Applauds
Castro 'Victory'
BERLIN (VP) - Walter Ulbicht,
Communist chief of East Germany,
today sent congratulations to Cu-
ban Prime 'Minister Fidel Castro
on "the wonderful victory achieved
under your leadership fver the
aggressors, the mercenary tools of
United States imperialism."
E,

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATIONt
306 North Division
Sundays-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion..
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House..
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-y
5:15 Doily evening prayer.

r E

World News Roundup

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
Morning Worship]0:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care Provided.-
Minister: Dr. Wm. S. Baker. Sermon: "The
Covenant Faith: People of the Promise."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
r8:00 'p.m.Wednesdoy Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
.age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to.
6 years of age).
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1415 Hill Street
NO 2-9890

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wm. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11:50 a.m.
Sermons:,9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.-Dr. Henry
Kuizenga preaching: "The Gospel in a Uni-
versity Town."
11:50 .m.-Rev. David Van Winkle: "A
Slippery Prize."
Sunday, April 23
10:30 a.m. Seminar in French Room. "The
Christian Man-The Defense of Chastity."
Rev. Jack Borckardt.
11 :30 a.m. Student Coffee' Hour in French
Room.
4:30 p.m. "Key Concepts of the New Testa-
ment." 217 S. Observatory. Pat Pickett.
6:30 p.m. Presbyterian Student Fellowship
Forum. Held in French Room. Vespers.
Tuesday, April 25
9:00 p.m. "Coffee and Conversation with
Pat." 217 S. Observatory.
Thursday, April 27
4:15 p.m. "The Message of the New Testa-
ment-The Kingdom of God." Lane Hall--
Conference Room. Rev. Jack Borckardt.
Friday, April 28
6:15 p.m. Grad Group Dinner. Panel Discus-
sion: "English Speaking People-is There
Unity?"
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House ot 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "Roll With The
Punch," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
10:20-10:40 Bible Lecture, Dr. Preston Slosson.
Church School: Crib through 12th Grade. 9:30-
10:40 & 10:55-12:00.
Student Guild: 524 Thompson, Sunday Evening.
Fellowship at 7:30.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH1
Corner State nd Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
29th Annual Missionary Conference
April 16 - 19, 1961
10:00 Sunday School
8:45 & 11 :00 MorningWorship. "The Chris-
tain and Retaliation."
5:30 Student Guild. Prof. S., Herbert Bess,
Lecture and Slides on Palestine.
5:45 Youth Group.
7:00 Evening Service. Prof. S. Herbert Bess.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 350 S. 5th
Morning Service, 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service, 7:30.
Guest Minister: The ;Rev. Henry Ver Meer, of
the Hope Reformed Church, Grand Rapids,
'Michigan
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Mr. Alvin Hoksbergen, Pastor.
Morning Services, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M..
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron.
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
SATURDAY-
1:30 P.M. Meet at the Campus Center
leave for the retreat at Grass Lake.
SUNDAY-
9:45 A.M. Church School. Discussion
the' Old Testament with Professor E
gar Willis.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service: "The Dong
of Dialing God," The Rev. Jamesr
Middleton preaching.,
6:45 P.M. ABSF P'resentation and discu!
sign of the tape recording' "Burl
Bags."
WEDNESDAY--
12 noon to 1 P.M. Luncheon and discussi
of Paul Tillich.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH ANI
WESLEY FOUNDATIQN
State and Huron Streets. Tel. NO 8-688
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister N
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship..Co
ditions of Discipleship (1) What/Kind
God Do You Worship? Sermon by Dr. R
pert.
10:15 Seminar: "Skeptic's Comer." Questic
Is the idea of God a realistic presuppos
tion? Pine Room.
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
7:00 Worship and Program. The tape: "T
Investigator." Wesley Lounge.
Wednesdays.
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion. Chapel, follow
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over
time for 8:00 -classes.)
Fridays
5:30 p.m. Wesley Graduate Student Fello'
ship dinner followed by program. Pine Roc
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur Dauer, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 'and at 11:15: Worship Sert
ices, Sermon, "A Letter From John Mork-
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Group
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran St
dent Club, Supper and Program, with a-r
view of "The New English Bible" by Pasi
Scheips.
Wednesday at 8:15:' Chapel Assembly meetir
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
' 423 South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Service, Re
Ernest R. Klaudt.
1:30 P.M. informal Chat with Owen Lot'
more, 524 Thompson.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street and South Forest Avenue
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-

By The Associated Press
LEOPOLDVILLE - President
Joseph Kasavubu took off yes-
terday for a "summit" meeting of
the Congo's pro-Western leaders.
Leftwlng rebel leader Antoine
Gizenga has been invited to' the
conference, to be held in Coquil-
hatville, but there is no indication
he will attend.
Among those with Kasavubu
were Premier Joseph nleo and
Foreign Minister Justin Bomboko.
Deputy Premier Jean Bolinkango
flew ahead of the main party yes-
terday.
The meeting is to be a contin-
uation of the political planning
started last month at Tananar-
ive, when the same Congolese pol-
iticians drew up the principles
of a Congolese confederation.
*' * *
NEW DELHI, India -- Prime
Minister Nehru told his governing
Congress arty in Parliament last
night he is not planning to re-
tire in the foreseeable future.
'The statement followed inten-
sive lobbying for election of a
deputy leader to replace the late
Home Minister Govind Ballabh
Pant. Three names were in the
forefront of the lobbying: Finance
Minister Morai Desaiar - dHome
Minister Lai Bahadur Shastni and

deputy leader, automatically would
succeed Nehru as prime minister.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee con-
cluded hearings yesterday on the
disputed-nomination of Julius C.
Holmes to be ambassador to Iran.
Its approval seemed likely de-
spite questioning about the nom-
inee's accumulation of a fortune
in deals involving surplus United
States ships.
Sen. John Sprakman (D-Ala),
acting committee chairman, said
the group has not yet set a date
for action and he would not pre-
dict what the committee will do.
But. after the hearing ended,
Sparkman shook hands' with
Holmes and .told him "I think your
troubles are over."
LONDON -A monthly diplo-
matic journal claimed yesterday,
that would-be spies are rushing
to gatecrash the tight world of
international espionage and of-
fering worthless secrets to Com-
munist embassies.
The result, according to "The
Diplomatist," has been embar-
rassment for diplomats and trade
experts of Iron Curtain countries
in Britain.
i .ov.. ..w . mIP I

Greeting Cards
Fountain Pens
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
STEEL DESKS
CHAIRS, FILES
*"" CA

I

I

MORRILLS
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

Meeting for Worship, 10:00
Adult Forum: 10:00 a.m.
Young Friends, 7:00 p.m.

and 11:30 a.m.

III!

SPECIAL
SUBSCRIPTION RECORDING
First Concert CONTEMPORARY MUSIC FESTIVAL
Presented in Hill Auditorium, Fri., April 14
STRAVINSKY .. . Symphony of Psalms
University Choir and Orchestra
Joseph Blatt, Conductor
DALLAPICCOLA . . . Songs of Captivity
Michigan Singers and U. Orchestra
Maynard Klein, Conductor

MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
Sunday School 9:45 o.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wed., 7:30 p.m.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist
Convention.

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.

9;00 a.m. Worship Service.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service and Cc
nion.
7:00 p.m. Concert: Robert Noehrer
versity Organist, and The'.Mi
TudorSincers, Maynard Klein,

Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan

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