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April 20, 1961 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-20

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THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE mr

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE F~

Wegman Cites Possibility
Of Peace Corps Training

By SANpRA JOHNSON
There are several areas includ-
ing nursing activities and water
plant operation in which the pub-
lic health school might be able
to train people to work in the
Peace Corps, Dean Myron E. Weg-
man said yesterday.
It would be "infinitely more de-
sirable" for these programs to be
in cooperation with the World
Health Organization and the Pan
'T' Announces
Motorscooter
Parkin Areas
The Office of Student Affairs
and Joint Judiciary Council have
announced five parking areas
which are available for the use of
motorized cycle operators.
They are:
The street area designated "For
Scooters Only" on East Universi-
ty near Ulrich's.
The bicycle rack area between
the Undergraduate Library and
the Main Library.
The brick area between West
Engineering and Randall Labora-
tory.
The "triangle" between the
Natural Science Building and Ma-
son Hall.
The area behind the Frieze
Building.
All of these areas are accessible
from the street by driveways. Mo-
torized cycle operators are warned
that operation of their vehicles on
sidewalks constitutes a violation of
State laws. Tickets will be issued
for this type of offense.
Trst T Discuss
Social Systems,
Professor Eric Trist, Program
Director of the Tavistok Institute,
London, England will lecture on
"Some Characteristics of Socio-
Technical Systems" at 4:15 today
in Aud. C.
Professor Trist is performing re-
search in the areas of personality
and social organization.

American Health Organization, he
continued, so. that Peace Corps
aid could be included in the plan-
ning for the development of the
country, and not Just forced upon.
it.
"One need that people" have is
for nursing auxiliaries." These
people need not be graduate
nurses, Dean Wegman explained;
college graduates who have had
special training could perform
limited but very useful tasks in
nursing activities.
Adequate quantity of purified
water is another great need, Dean
Wegman pointed out. Young peo-
ple in the Peace Corps could be
trained to operate the water
plants until there are enough na-
tional people to do it.
It has been suggested that the
University might operate public
health programs overseas, Dean
Wegman said. He added that he
had already worked with overseas
programs for many years and had
a "very great appreciation" of the
difficulties involved.
"I hope the University does not
accept this responsibility without
being aware of these problems,"
Dean Wegman cautioned, but he
made it clear that he believed that
the University should support the
Peace Corps program vigorously
to the extent that its facilities
permit.
Grant Funds
For Research
The McGregor Fund has grant-
ed the University of Michigan
Center for Research on Conflict
Resolution $20,000, to carry on re-
search in the fields of conflict
resolution and peace studies, Wil-
liam Barth, administrative assist-
ant, said yesterday. ,
The grant, awarded on March
15, from 'the Detroit foundation
will be used to defray partially
administrative costs, pay salaries,
subsidize the Journal of Conflict
Resolution and generally cover
staff needs.
If the Conflict Resolution Cen-
ter maintains itself for three
years, the University will allocate
funds for its future support. The
Center is now in its second year
so the grant will probably allow
the Center to qualify for Univer-
sity funds, Barth explained.
The purpose of the Center is to
compile and analyze scholarly
studies on the resolution of con-
flicts among individuals, groups
and nations.
Members of the group doing
peace research come from such
diversified fields as political sci-
ence, economics, sociology and
psychology,

YR 'sProtest,
NSA Claims
In Platform
The Midwest Young Republicans
convention, meeting in St. Paul
last weekend, adopted a state-
ment denunciating the National
Student Association as its major
platform declaration.
The YR's said that the NSA
"purports to represent the Ameri-
can student population, with a
membership composed of less than
a third of American colleges and
with major resolutions passed by
only twenty-five members of an
executive committee."
Considering foreign policy, the
YR's gave their "unqualified sup-
port" to the Connolly amendment
on the World Court. They sup-
ported the Peace Corps but called
for a re-evaluation of its princi-
ples, and asked that the United
States be prepared to take offen-
sive action in the event of foreign
intervention in Laos.
Conservatives swept the top of-
fices at the convention. YR Chair-
man Steve Stockmeyer, however,
continued to discount the "press
manufactured young conservative
movement."
The Michigan club supported a
moderate liberal, Peter McPher-
son of Michigan State University,
for federation chairman, but lost
the chairmanship and other of-
fices after a crucial credentials
committee floor vote Saturday
night.
"The conservatives aren't taking
over the federation," Stockmeyer
said, but he also noted that last
year's liberal victory was the only
one in several years.

DISCUSS TRENDS:
University Lawyers Hold
First National Meeting
By CAROLINE DOW :: mf

The first national conference of
University Attorneys concluded its
three day meeting at the Michi-
gan Union yesterday after form-
ing a national organization for the
perpetuation of the conference.
Over sixty attorneys for univer-
sities and colleges around the
country decided that there is a
need for such a conference to keep
abreast of legal problems peculiar
to the schools. The group was
gathered at a conference spon-,
sored by the Institute for Higher
Education. M. M. Chambers, Vis-
iting Professor of higher educa-
tion, coordinated the conference.
Legal aspects of the responsibil-
ity of the institution to the stu-
dent, relations of a public insti-
tution to state and local govern-
mnent, federal taxation and fund
raising and the university as a
corporate body, were discussed at
the meetings.
Due Process
Ralph F. Lesemann, legal coun-
sel of the University of Illinois
and new president of the Con-
ference, presented a paper noting
the trend of courts to hold univer-
sities responsible for maintaining
"due process of law" in their dis-
ciplining of students.
A paper by John C. Monk of
Oklahoma State University on the
justification and uses of legal
autonomy for public universities
and colleges stated, "public high-
er education is more a function
of society than it is a function
of government and that academic

~ELISSFlEErS

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS:
Dalhousie University Views
New Discrimination Problem.

DEAN ALLEN A. SMITH
* lists Regents' powers
and administrative freedom can-
not be separated."
Monk .said, however, that in
"real politics" public higher edu-
cation can never be independent
of the purse which is held by
state legislatures, nor are they
entitled to unlimited freedom as
they are subject to the people of.
the state.
Dean Allan A. Smith of the Law
School spoke on the constitution-
al autonomy of the University
pointing out that Article 8 of the
1850 constitution the Regents
were empowered as a corporate
body to have the "general super-
vision of the University" and di-
rection and control of University
funds.
Regents Control Operation
He noted that in later provi-
sions and decisions gave the Re-
gents "exclusive" control over the
operation of the University, free
from legislative interference. How-
ever, "this autonomy and inde-
pendence begins after the money
is appropriated and there is noth-
ing in the constitutional status
which guarantees an appropria-
tion," he said.
The control of the legislature
ends with the appropriation, ac-
cording to the precedent of court
cases in Michigan. An attempt to
limit or otherwise control the use
of the funds was held unconsti-
tutional, Prof. Smith concluded.
Schedule Lecture,
Carillon Concert
Music events scheduled for to-
day include a lecture by Hans T.
David, of the music school, titled
"'He with Her Alone'-a Puzzle
of 1520," at 8:30 in Rackham
Amph. and a carillon concert by
Sidney F. Giles, University as-
sistant carillonneur, at 7:15.

FOR RENT
MUMMER 4 bedroom house at 1023
Church. Call NO 2-7728. C85
FOR RENT-5 rm. apartment opposite
Markley. Summer and/or fal. Call
3-4787. 084
NINE ROOM HOUSE with attached ga-
rage for summer rent at 932 Green-
wood. For four people. Call NO 3-
7279. C88
FORMER DOUBLE now being rented as
single. Large, clean room. Linen. Park-
ing and refrigerator. $35 per month.
Located next to E. Quad, 1108 Hill
St. Call Dan, NO 5-7930. 083
SUMMER: Modern 2 bedroom Turn.
apt., air conditioned, dish washer,
disposal, parking. 2 blocks from cam-
pus & hospital. Phone NO 8-7651. 074
TO RENT: Modern summer apartment,
2 bedrooms, electric kitchen, air con-
ditioned, fully furnished. 2 blocks
from campus. Call NO 3-4028. C79
APT. FOR RENT. New turn, apt. for 4
available for summer. 1 block from
campus. Parking facilities available.
NO 3-1828 . 078
SUMMER: Modernly furnished, spa-
cious, 61,z room apartment. Can ac-
commodate 4-6 persons. Parking on
campus, reasonable. 5-7824. 081
MODERN 2 bedroom apt. near hospi-
tal. Available June 1. NO 5-7092. C82
SUMMER-sublet, completely furnished
one bedroom modern Arbordaie Man-
or Apt. Including TV, air cond., dis-
posal, etc. $95. NO 3-4856. C77
TWO BEDROOM Furnished Apt. Three
or four persons. Very reasonable. NO
3-4402. C73
SUMMER apartment near campus. 3
furnished rooms and bath. $90 per
month. Call 3-0618 after 6 P.M. C68
FURNISHED 4 bedroom home, 1%
baths, porch, secluded yard. Available
May 20-Sept. 10. $160 per month, less
for entire time. Car included. 3-8494.
072
WANTED, working girl or part-time
student to share apartment close to
campus and hospital. Call NO 2-9731
evenings. 0159
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
BUMPING, PAINTING, all kinds of auto
repairs. Free estimates. Call NO 5-4042
J. B. Auto Repair 318 N. First Street
82
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
82
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Ride to Cornell or area week-
end of May 13. Share driving and ex-
penses. Rita Levant. NO 2-2545. G13

LINES
2
3
4.

ONE-DAY
.80
.96
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
.39
.47
.54

I

Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Cali Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon, thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

I

BUSINESS SERVICES
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647. J10
From pencils to typewriters--
If you write, we have it!
MORR I LL'S
314 South State St. NO 3-2481
"Giving Morrill support to students
for over 50 years."
J3

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Special on
Mitch Miller Record
"SING ALONG"
Monoro $2.65, Stereo $3.25

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Grinnell's

Get fatter faster
on food from
RALPH'S MARKET

323 S. Main

NO 2-5667

709 Packard

NO 2-31751

Tennis Rackets'
from PAKISTAN
$5.00 each
at the
India Art.Shop
330 Maynard

Discrimination against foreign
students is becoming a serious
problem at Dalhousie University,
Nova Scotia's largest university.
"I suppose I've run into as much
trouble as anyone else at Dal,"
said a student from the West In-
des. "But what good will it do-
me to talk about it? Will it change
the color of my skin?"
Laurenti To Talk
On Property Value
Luigi Laurenti will speak on
"Property Values and Race" at 8
p.m. today at Rackham Aud.
Laurenti is a San Francisco
planning consultant and will
speak to the Ann Arbor committee
on real estate practices. The lec-
ture is open to the public.

I

Charles Fanning, President of
the International Students Asso-
ciation at Dalhousie, said he was
"shocked" at the way foreign stu-
dents were treated. "Almost with-
out exception," he said, "the col-
ored students are ignored, dis-
criminated against or treated with
phony paternalism."
William Dickinson, Vice-Presi-
dent of the Student Council, said
the Council had turned the prob-
lem over to the' Association be-
cause "frankly, we don't know
what to do."
Natural reserve was cited as
contributing to the problem as
well as racial prejudice. Foreign
students agreed and indicated that
they feel that the situation will
improve.
Copyright 1961, The New York Times

Avis

..d

r

Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday .
$12.00 plus 8c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
"*TRUCKS AVAILABLE

U

Open every night 'til midnight.
J80
TYPING, quick efficient, 12 yrs. expe-
rience. Call NO 3-9935.. J15
USED CARS
1952 MERCEDES 220 4-door sedan. Ex-
cellent condition. $950. Call Jim. NO
5-8480. N23
1960 CORVAIR, Deluxe coupe. Standard
shift, whitewalls, heater & radio. Good
condition. $1395. NO 2-8820. N25
'51 FORD. Stick shift, .4-door, good
transportation. $95. NO 3-9697. N24
PACKARD 1955, 2 door hard top, $200.
NO 3-1511, ext. 2953 8-5, NO 5-4017
after 6 p m.N22
'53 PLYMOUTH convertible. $225. Call
NO 3-4856 after 8 p.m. N21
1952 FORD, good running condition,
full tread tires, $80. NO 2-7816. 1420
AUSTIN-HEALY, 1957, 100-6 Roadster 4
seater. Overdrive, metallic blue lac-
quer, silver wire wheels, black leather
interior, black top, tonneau, radio,
heater. Lucas fog lamps, sliding alum-
inum windows, complete tools, own-
er's manual. Like new. Owner school
teacher. $1,775. Lincoln 5-8614 Oak
Park (Detroit suburb). N18
BIKES and SCOOTERS
1960 MOPED; Excellent condition, ex-
tras, $125 complete. NO 3-1022 before
8 p.m. Z35
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$7.95; socks
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.,
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington
W1
YOU are MISSING SOMETHING at the
Treasure Mart. 529 Detroit. NO 2-1363.
Open Mon. and Fri. nites 'til 9. W2
FOR SALE
'55 DODGE, 2 dr. hd top V-8, excellent
buy, $275. NO 2-2234. B39
BRAND NEW Royal typewriter, retails
$120, selling for $75. Won in contest.
NO 5-6341 after 10 p.m. or before 9
am. B40
THE BOOK CORNER, above Treasure
Mart, 509 Detroit St. Open Fri. 6-9,
Sat. 9-5. "Any book anywhere." NO 2-
5941. K3
1957 SCHULT Mobile Home, 1 bedroom.
Call HU 2-3532. B93
INCOME HOUSE: by a student owner.
Gross income $300 per conth. Campus
location. Call NO 2-6094 evenings. B7
ONE HI FI Record Player and 8" ex-
tension speaker for $75. 1 Bell tape
recorder for $100, both 1i good cond.
Call after 6 P.M. NO 3-7050. B31
PHOTO SUPPLIES
MOVIE CAMERA Canon ZM8, F1.4,
w/case. Trans. radio, 6&7 Trs. All
brand new. Bargain. Call NO 3-2684 or
leave message with NO 3-4288. B76
BUSINESS PERSONAL

xli
IS YOUR HI FI sick, sick, sick? For
needy relief call Doc Craig at Ann Ar-
bor Hi Fi and TV Center-across from
Hill Aud. NO 5-8807. X18
Pilot 12 watt Mono Ark. How much? $20
to anyone at all-WE TAKE TRADES.
Our 595 Diamond needles ARE FULLY
GUARANTEED. Ann Arbor Hi F1 and
TV Center-across from Hill Aud. NO
5-8607. Service and repairs. X17
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and, BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
Xi
PERSONAL
BOUNCE BOUNCE, BOUNCE! Every-
body's doing it. Get in on the fun.
Revert back to your childhood. Buy
yourself a Spring Weekend paddle
ball for only fifteen cents. F198
SENIORS: Order your graduation an-
nouncements now. On sale at the
Student Activities Building, March
22-31 and April 11-13. Sales from 1-5
each day except March 25 from 9-12.
Price is 12c each. 127
A FABULOUS PROGRAM-Five musical
skits, Dr. Richard Cutler, and the
Arbors. See all this for Skit Nite, April
28 at eight at Hill Auditorium, Tick-
ets on sale at the Diag. F199
Join the DAILY and see the world -
through an Associated Pries Teletype
Machine. Fil
Tickets for SPRING WEEKEND are on
sale now at the Diag, Eng. Arch, and
the Union on Monday through Friday
from noon to five. Skit Nite tickets
are $1.25 and $1.75. Tickets for the
dance with Sarah Vaughan are $3.50
per couple. P196
LECTURE NOTES, individual lectures or
semester subscription. Office 30432 S.
They're colorful, cute, and lively. See
the Spring Weekend JESTERS on the
Diag every day. While you're: on the
scene, buy yourself a ticket to Spring
Weekend. F195
To MAIZE MENACE:
See you on Diag at 1 o'clock.
CUPID F192
BOYS, sorry we can't help out, but meet
us AT Olive and State in East Lan-
sing tomorrow at one. P.C. F200
SPRING WEEKEND TICKETS
for
DANCE & SKIT NITE
On Sale Now
DIAG - ENG. ARCH
UNION
7197
VV

I

I

BEFORE you buy a classring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. FF2

SPRING WEEKEND
"ERRED ERA"

SKIT NITE
with
FIVE MUSICAL SKITS
and
DR. RICHARD CUTLER, MC
and
M. u 0 A lnAN

11

1 1

m1 11111 i

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