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April 20, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHiGAN DAILY

aos Asks Aid
* * * *

To

Halt

Rebel

*

*

*

*

Catr o's

Victory'

Crushed

As

Rebels

Renew

IU .S . A v o i d s --'_J e s r
As Aggressor
UNITED NATIONS P - The
Soviet campaign seeking United
Nations condemnation of the
United States as an aggressor in
Cuba fell flat yesterday.
Support mounted instead for' a
proposal by Latin American na-
tions to let them take the leading
role in promoting a peaceful set-
tlement of the Cuban situation.,
Raul Roa, the Cuban foreign
minister, reported to the UN, po-
litical committee the downing of.
a United States military plane
after it had bombed Cuba and
said this was additional proof of
"flagrant" United States interven-
tion.
But despite Roads angry charges
and Soviet bloc denunciations of
the United States the committee
appeared headed for adoption of
a mildly worded Latin-American
resolution stressing that the Cub-
an crisis is strictly a Western
"Hemisphere affair.'
The resolution urges members
of the Organization of the Ameri-
can States to help bring about a
peaceful settlement.
Ambassador Mario Amadeo of
Argentina rejected Soviet bloc
charges as interference that could
only aggravate existing- tensions.
He expressed the hope common
sense would prevail and "no new
Danzig or Sarejevo will spark the
flames of a world conflagration."
U. of M. FOLK
a PICKING are
ON TH
OR IN T H E
depending on
FRIDAY, APRI L 2
TO SELL TICK
FOLK FE
GOOD TICKET
a a aa aft

Gulf'of Mexico

FLORIDA
Key WestA

Nassau
-9s
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sland

, L
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MILEO
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4

Matanzas Ls Villas ._%.mm
HAVAN AProvince Province
CABANASJo uo(a ronde Coa u
Ciendgo '« *>Camague
Oriental sGenfuegos Province
Oriente
Province
Isle. of Puntes
BARACOA
Guantanamo
Caribbean Sea
' Y aSANTIAGO,
INVASION POINTS-This map locates three areas in Cuba where invaders have landed, according to
reports from Cuban exiles in the United States: 1-On Cuba's south coast, at southern border of Ma-
tanzas Province; 2-At Cabanas, near western end of island; 3--Baracoa, on eastern tip of Cuba.

NEWSMEN CRITICIZE:

Spokesman
Denies End
Of Invasion
First Troops Reach
Escambry Mountains
By The Associated Press
SAN JUAN-Anti-Castro forces
announced last night a new inva-
sion contingent has landed in
Cuba.
Earlier reports from Havana de-
picted Cuban Premier Fidel Cas-
tro as having claimed a 'near
victory.',
The announcement was by a
spokesman for the Cuban Demo-
cratic Revolutionary Front in
Puerto Rico and came in the face
of Communist and Castro partisan
claims that the anti-Castro re-
volt was about to collapse in de-
feat on the beaches.
The new landing was reported
as the Cuban revolutionary council
in New York announced that the
major portion of its original
spearhead of' several hundred men,
which set up a beachhead on the
south coast early Monday, had
reached the Escambray Mountains
after fighting off fierce attacks
by the forces of Prime Minister
Fidel Castro.
The council said this force -
which evidently abandoned its
beachhead on Cochinos Bay-had
to contend with "Communist ad-
visers" in the Castro force, as well
as Soviet-supplied, tanks, artillery
and planes.
Angrily denouncing earlier
claims by Havana radio and Yu-
goslav Communist newsmen that
the invasion was about to be liqui-
dated, the rebel spokesman in
Puerto Rico said the invasion was
going accordin~g to plan.
He said the invasion force di-
vided into two columns,' accord-
ing to prearrangement, and mov-
ed into the mountains and that
the invaders received strong sup-
port from the Cuban people.
The report on the new beach-
head came from Tomas Gamba,
secretary to War Minister Antonio
Verona in the anti-Castro Cuban
revolutionary council.
Cuba's government insisted last
night it would totally crush the
island's invasion-borne rebellion
within hours.
In Washington President John
F. Kennedy called for a full cab-
inet meeting for today-only the
third such meeting in his admin-
istration.

Force
Rebel Attacks
Menace Nation,
Government
By The Associated Press
VIENTIANE-The Laotian gov-
ernment yesterday called for more
foreign aid in fighting pro-Com-
munist rebels as major new offen-
sives threatened to conquer the
small nation and sweep into neigh-
boring countries.
Foreign Minister Tiao Sopsa-
sans received an immediate prom-
ise that United States military ad-
visers will go into the combat
zones. He disclosed that Laos is
also considering asking for for-
eign troops to stem the rebel at-
tacks.
See Weakening Position
United States embassy sources
said the government's position is
"steadily weakening" but deflated
claims of massive rebel assaults.
Washington's decision to send
United States advisers into com-
bat zones means about 300 civil-
ian-dressed American military
men who have been instructing
royal troops will put on uniforms
today' and become a full-fledged
military advisory group.
Support British Move
The State Department also an-
nounced that the United States
would send more war supplies to
the government forces fighting
pro-Communist rebels in the
Southeast Asian kingdom.
United States agreed that the
United States action would be
contrary to the 1954 Geneva agree-
ment. It forbids the establishment
of military advisory groups in
Laos. But, the officials said, the
United States did not sign the
agreement.
The Soviet Union, which did
sign the agreement, has flagrant-
ly violated it by delivering arms
and personnel to the rebels, they
charged.
NATO Awards
Go to Students
WASHINGTON (P) - Three
Michigan university students are
among 44 selected by the National
Science Foundation and the State
Department for National Atlantic
Treaty Organization' scholarships
providing a year's -scientific study
in Western Europe.
The Michigan students are Lee
G. McKnight and James D. Van
Putten, both of the University and
Otto W. Neuhaus of Wayne State
University. -
The awards are part of an ex-
change program launched in 1959
by NATO to further the full de-
velopment of science and tech-
nology inthe Atlantic community.
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mercy because I know I am not
worthy of it."
His recorded statement sent a
surprised stir through the court.
Eichmann himself seemed affect-
ed by what was taking place in
court for the first time
He took off his earphones
through which the court's Hebrew
proceedings are translated into
German, and seemed to relax in
his chair behind the bullet-proof
glass in the prisoner's dock.
Taped Interrogation
The statements were taped in
an interrogation by Israeli securi-
ty officers after his capture last
year.
Eichmann insisted he was not
the architect of Nazi Germany's.
campaign of extermination. "I
was in a lower rank than the
policy makers and planners. I
cannot claim that I had clean
hands. Those who planned and
gave instructions, however, got off
cheaply by suicide.",

Chiefs Defen,
Army Afit~
,Fund Increas
WASHINGTON (JP)-The Ar
top civilian and uniformed c
gave a qualified "yes" yeste
when asked if funds requeste
President John F. Kennedy
enable the Army to fulfil
worldwide obligations.
Both Secretary of the Arm:
vis J. Stahr, Jr. and-Gen. G4
H. Decker, Army chief of s
sidestepped a direct reply
whether the Army is prepare
use combat forces in Cuba, ii
dered to do so.
Stahr said the proposed 5
man increase in Army stre
would be adequate for existing
uations unless trouble broke of
several points simultaneously

the.BEACHCOMBERS
FOLKSONGS a'nd BALLADS

Cafe
Promethean

Claim U.S. Withholds In formation

EICHMANN STATEMENT:
Sees Self Doomed,
'Unworthy' of Mer
JERUSALEM (P)-Adolf Eichmann portrayed himself in to
corded testimony yesterday as a doomed man who should have]Y
himself for the mass slaughter of Jews in the Nazi reign of
Hitler.
"I know I should have hanged myself in public so that
anti-Semites in the world would have had these terrible even
phasized for them."
The words, slow and measured, boomed from the loudspea
the court where he is on trial for his life, charged with crimes a
the Jewish people and crimes against humanity.
Can't Claim Mercy
"I know I may face a sentence of death," said the man cl
with responsibility for sending millions of Jews to death car
World War II. "I cannot claim

Friday
Saturdray
Admission 75c

9-12 P.M.

WASHINGTON -P)-The John
F. Kennedy administration so far
has not kept its promises of an.
open-door information policy, a
committee said yesterday in a re-
LORE SOCIETY
id SINGING.
E DIAG
FISHBOWL
the weather
1, 1961 . . . 11-3
.ETS FOR THE
STIVAL
S AVAILABLE

port to the American Society of
Newspaper Editors.
The State and Defense Depart-
ments particularly are obstructing
full access to the news, said the
terse report filed with the society's
board of directors by Eugene S.
Pulliam of Indianapolis, chairman
of the ASNE Freedom of Informa-
tion Committee.
The ASNE wil open its annual
meeting here today. The Pulliam
report was received and discuss-
ed, in Pulliam's absence, at a
closed .pre-convention meeting of
the directors.
"President Kennedy, both be-
fore and after his election, was
on record in writing as believing
in freedom of information andin
his duty to see that the people
are informed," said Pulliam,. man-

aging editor of the Indianapolis
News.
"To date, neither he nor his
administration has lived up to
his promise."
Congress also came in for cri-
ticism in the report for the con-
tinued withholding of data on
House travel expenses, for closed
committee hearings, and for the
inclusion of what Pulliam called
a "secrecy clause" in the medical
aid amendment to the Social Se-
curity Act.
It was disclosed at the board
meeting that 11 Soviet newspaper
editors will visit the United States
in May, in an exchange plan un-
der Which several members of the
ASNE will visit Russia later, prob-
ably in September.

F

-

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ROA VITOR REOORDS ANN
~ 01EARTHN

World News Roundup
By The Assoclated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL-The atomic submarine Robert E. Lee yes-
terday launched a Polaris missile while gliding beneath the Atlantic
Ocean about 30 miles offshore.
Under a recently-adopted policy, the Defense Department did
not announce whether the test was successful. Department officials
said they no longer will report results of missile launchings con-
ducted "away from public view."

'"

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MOSCOW - I. P. Ganenko,
Communist party chief in the As-
trakhan region on the Caspian
Sea, has been fired for not fulfill-
ing agricultural and industrial
production quotas, Pravda report-
ed yesterday.
The Communist party newspa-
per said he was replaced by V. I.
Antonov., The change was an-
nounced three days after the par-
ty chief and the prime minister of
Tadzhikstan were reported ousted
for falsifying cotton production
figures.
* * *
-OTTAWA-An Indian diplomat,
K. Sankara Pillai, was slain yes-
terday in the office of the Indian
High Commissioner.

University of Michigan
Dance Organization
Presents
"DANCE
CONCERT.?
Thurs. & Fri., April 20 & 21,
at 8:00 o'clock,
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATER
All Seats Reserved
Tickets $1.25

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